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New dog Mel - mouthing experience

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by janemac, May 25, 2010.


  1. janemac

    janemac PetForums Junior

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    I have a new female rescue labx collie. Just under a year and come via a Irish rescue through to Many Tears which is based in South Wales. Really just wanted to share an experience I have had in case it helps somebody else. I am an experienced dog owner but reckon I must have been lucky with my previous 6 rescues, I also run a dog walking business. When I got Mel 2 weeks ago she was "crazy" don't think she had ever been on a lead and just seemed totally pent up. She is getting on average 2-3 hours a day "off lead" exercise in wonderful places, foreshore and woods. This is helping to burn off her energy and she is well socialised as I will normally walk her with other dogs. Two main downsides, never been on a lead and I was at risk of having my arms pulled out of sockets. Did the treats and heel but worked until treats ran out so relented to getting a halti, helps tremendously. Other prob was mouthing, normally a mad time happens in the evening. I stood up crossed my arms, no eye contact which did work for a minute until I sat down. Did resort to saying no but this seemed to excite her even more. Decided to try distraction and got a new ball. She has play in the evening with this, although it is up to me when I throw and at times I ignore her. No mouthing for 2 nights since I introduced this. Fingers crossed but at local dog training class they demonstrated a technique which I really was unhappy with, especially for new rescue. They held her by her neck and took her feet off the ground until she yelped in total fear. Did absolutely nothing and next day she was reluctant to come to me. My rememdy is loads of exercise, good food, affection and training on recall in woods plus a short session in evening. Just thought these experiences might help somebody.

    Having said all this she is great and I love seeing her running and just totally enjoying life.:thumbup:
     
  2. lucysnewmum

    lucysnewmum PetForums Senior

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    i love your methods.... with patience and love you will succeed with her...
    i am appalled at a trainer taking a dog off its feet so....:mad:
    i thought those archaic methods were dying out....it would appear not.
    no training, especially for a delicate little dog who has suffered some trauma, should involve physical or mental punishment. i hope you walked away from that trainer's classes and sought a much kinder one!
     
  3. janemac

    janemac PetForums Junior

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    Hi yes I certainly did walk away from her class and sort of came to a decision that when you have a rescue there is a settling in time which I think can iron out lots of probs. I still think you need to be firm so they understand boundaries but knowing they are going to get fed and exercised goes a long way to making them feel settled. Mel actually got on her bed yesterday which is the first time I have seen her on it which was a development. She had a great play with a border collie today and also plays with a young lab I walk. Her play is fairly dominant but she does back down if the other dog gets a bit rough. This seems to help with her energy levels and she is now swimming every day in the local streams. Fingers crossed - onwards and upwards!!
     
  4. goodvic2

    goodvic2 PetForums VIP

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    I think your methods are kinder. But I do think there are dogs which may need the physical contact.

    After all if a dog does this to another dog, then they are not going to stand their patiently with balls and treats.

    I don't agree that this is the correct approach with a new rescue dog, and indeed if you are going to man handle a dog, you never know what is going to happen.

    Sounds like you are doing exactly the right thing.

    Well done you x x
     
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