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New cat constantly meowing for food in evenings

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by crazycatman1983, Nov 26, 2016.


  1. crazycatman1983

    crazycatman1983 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi there everyone,

    We've recently adopted a cat from an RSPCA shelter, and he's been with us for about 3 months now. He's partially sighted, but I don't think that's anything to do with the problem we have.

    We have an existing cat, and we've been working hard to integrate the new one into the house, and have been trying to give him a routine he can get used to. And for the most part, he has settled in nicely. We feed him a pouch of wet food when we get up, a pouch of wet food early evening at about 6pm, and a small amount of dry food at 9pm.

    In the morning/daytime, he's great. He eats in the morning, settles and lies down in day. Then about 5.30ish, he obviously knows his evening meal is due, and starts meowing. We try to stick to the 6pm time religiously though. He eats it, and this is where the problem starts. He's okay for an hour or so after eating, but at about 7pm, he just starts meowing literally constantly. It's obvious he's after more food - as when we do eventually feed him his dry food, he settles again. But until then, he just doesn't stop.

    We've tried ignoring him - we try not to fuel the meowing by talking to him or acknowledging it. But it hasn't helped. He just continues.

    Can anyone offer any advice? When we were chatting to the RSPCA about his previous home, they implied he was neglected a fair amount, and wasn't always fed properly. So I suspect this may have something to do with it. He's also quite a small cat (and only 2.5 years old), so I can't believe we're not feeding him enough.

    Should we just continue with the routine and he'll eventually stay with it? Or perhaps change the food times/order? He's not a grazer either - what ever is put in front of him, he'll eat in one sitting.

    Any advice would be appreciated :).

    Thanks

    Crazy Cat Man
     
  2. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    I had a cat like this , he would gobble all his and then push the other cat away and eat her food too !The answer for us was a cat - feeder , with a receptacle on top that fell into a bowl below so he always had access to food.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ferplast-Z...0167622&sr=8-6&keywords=automatic+cat+feeders
    When he knew there was always food available he calmed down and was happy , didn't over eat either. I bought them one each on the grounds that he couldn't eat out of them both at the same time. They both got a wet meal at tea-time as well.
    He had a similar history, had been abandoned in a flat for days with no food so I think he panicked about being starved again. How anyone could do that is beyond me !
     
  3. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    TBH it sounds to me as though he is genuinely hungry, 2 pouches of wet plus a small amount of dry isn't a lot for a young cat.
    I would certainly increase the amount of wet food he is offered most adult males with a healthy appetite will eat around 250 gms of wet at least in a day.
    Would it be possible to introduce a mid-day meal as it does seem like a long time between breakfast and his evening meal.
    As for sticking to a time schedule........now this is just my thoughts on it,.........animals don't eat to a clock(I don't either) they eat when they are hungry and tend to eat little and often which IME makes tight time schedules impossible and not really in their best interest.
     
    Torin., spotty cats and chillminx like this.
  4. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    I would feed him more and improve his diet. He sounds hungry. Either the food is inadequate for his nutritional needs or he needs more of it.

    Feed canned pate foods instead of pouches. More nutrition and less carbs in them. Eliminate the dry food all together and feed a balanced raw meal or another nutrient dense canned meal.

    Add in another meal. Feed the morning meal, then a mid day meal, then the supper meal, then the bed time meal.

    And ignoring him isn't going to do him any good. When he starts crying give him attention. Play with him, pet him, groom him. He is trying to communicate to you that his needs aren't being met. It's your job to figure out what his needs are and meet them. : )
     
  5. crazycatman1983

    crazycatman1983 PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for your responses everyone :).

    @lorilu / @buffie - We're quite happy to feed him more if that's definitely what he needs. We're only feeding him the amount/diet recommended by the RSPCA vet for his size/age (apparently). Being partially sighted, he is an indoor cat, so also doesn't get a huge amount of exercise. Plus our existing cat has been overweight in the past as we used to feed him too much (though he's been on a diet and is fine now!) - so just don't want that to happen again.

    Another meal in the day is also an option - what would you recommend? We play with him constantly throughout the day and give him lots of fuss, and as I said, he's fine until about 7pm. We've tried playing with him and giving him lots of attention in case it's that, but he isn't interested - he just wants food.

    @SusieRainbow Interesting :) - as I mentioned in my other reply, I'm conscious giving him the opportunity to eat more food in case he eats way more than he's supposed to. In his second week we did give him another bowl of dried food in the evening (so 2 bowls) just to see what he did, and he ate it all, and then just started meowing again :(

    I guess I'm just worried there's something more psychological going on here rather than him just being hungry, that's all. If he genuinely needs more food, then fair enough. But I'm worried he'll just keep doing it even with extra food.
     
  6. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    You say he is a small cat but do you know what his weight is and have you actually compared him on a body score chart......http://www.wsava.org/sites/default/files/Body condition score chart cats.pdf.
    I would be very surprised if he were to put on weight by feeding him a bit more,especially if you change him on to a high meat no grain food and cut out the dry food as suggested by lorilu.
    I wont preach about dry food being bad but it really isn't a necessary part of a cats diet and is usually the reason behind cats gaining too much weight.
    I'm not the best person to advise about food and feeding regimes as my lad is a picky/fussy little sod and hardly eats enough to keep a sparrow alive but I have read of many members who advocate free feeding (always filling an empty bowl) when cats have had a history such as yours.
    The idea is that after a few weeks they realise that there is no longer a need to stress about food not being available so settle down into a normal eating pattern
     
  7. SpringDance

    SpringDance PetForums VIP

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    My girl cat is 3.5 kg and when she has punches, she eats at least 3 punches per day (nature's menu) - most of the time she has tins, though.

    She leaves food if full, but if outside in this weather, I notice she eats more. She's muscular and slim.

    Being indoors, you could play with him a lot to keep him active, then he'll also need more. I would try feeding more and see what happens.

    I would also look at the quality of food. Good quality food will leave him fuller and more satisfied than cheap food full of fillers.
     
  8. crazycatman1983

    crazycatman1983 PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for your responses everyone - I will look into feeding him a bit more (and what we're feeding him). Guess we're a bit confused as all the advice we were given was 2 pouches (morning and dinner time) plus a cup of dry food in the evening. Will do some research into diet a bit more and come back to report some results.

    We feed our other cat just dry food as he has a very sensitive stomach, so he's on Science Plan for sensitive stomach (as all the wet food we try tends to make him sick). But open to the new one not having it if it isn't much good for him.
     
  9. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    I agree with the others, I'd stop feeding your boy any dry as it's high in carbs and calories and fattening. I'd just feed him as much wet food as he wants.

    My two girls aged 3 yrs old eat about 350 grams of wet food each a day, no dry and neither of them is overweight. Though they do have all day access to my garden, so they get quite a lot of exercise, always on the go. But if you are playing a lot with your cat he should be getting plenty of exercise and could be fed more. :)
     
    SpringDance and buffie like this.
  10. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    I did promise not to preach about dry food but since you are up for doing some research I thought you may appreciate having a read of this article................http://www.littlebigcat.com/nutrition/why-dry-food-is-bad-for-cats-and-dogs/
     
  11. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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