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New adult Doberman (help?)

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Zenia, Jun 15, 2019.


  1. Zenia

    Zenia PetForums Newbie

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    hello. So a bit of backstory, me and my family (we have a baby and a cat) have been thinking about getting a dog for quite a while. Recently we saw an online ad for a 2yr old female Doberman, we haven’t met her yet and we may not even have her as there was someone else interested before us but I wanted a second opinion regardless. Since Dobies are such people oriented dogs & tend to get attached to their people I’m worried about taking this dog from their human/home environment, I want to minimise stress for her as much as possible.

    So what I’d like help with is how would I settle her in and what’s your opinion on the situation?
    We plan to keep her muzzled for a little while at first for the safety of the cat/baby to see how she reacts, providing we meet her and she seems happy with us. Thankyou :)
     
  2. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    Why is she being rehomed?
     
  3. Zenia

    Zenia PetForums Newbie

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    The ad says it’s due to the owners ill health
     
  4. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    I’d exercise extreme caution rehoming any dog with a young baby or kids, even via a reputable rescue but at least they should offer support and backup and be able to give some assurances on the dog’s behaviours/temperament.

    Worst case scenario, they’ll take the dog back.

    Doberman’s are not an easy breed. With a young baby, do you really have the time to devote to this dog who will need plenty of exercise, ongoing training and could turn out to be challenging (if the owners are spinning a tale?)

    I’d also take with a pinch of salt what the owners say about their reasons tbh.

    Unless she’s already muzzle trained that isn’t an option at first as it will take a while to train her the correct way to be happy in a muzzle.
     
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  5. niamh123

    niamh123 PetForums VIP

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    When I was a child there was a neighbour of ours who showed and bred Doberman's he had a bitch named Heidi and everytime he put her in pup she would deliver them early and none would survive he was telling my mother that he was in his words getting rid of her he didn't seem to care who he gave her to she had lived outside her whole life,but after talking to my Dad they decided to take her on she was 3 yrs old at the time we also had Jack our Curlycoated retriever they got on with no problem's .She was speyed 3 months after we got her and while there my mother mentioned that her eyes were also very red and she seemed uncomfortable on further inspection the vet said she had a prolem with her eyes and would need operating on ,so after she got over her spey her eyes were operated on although she lived outside in her previous home she never went to the toilet in the house and just loved our company she lived to age 14 .

    If you take on this girl you can't just put a muzzle on her she would need to be muzzle trained and as you say you are worried about the dog around your baby,if this is the case I honestly don't think this would be a good idea taking this girl on:)
     
  6. Bugsys grandma

    Bugsys grandma PetForums VIP

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    I'm inclined to agree with what's already been said.
    Dobermans, whilst lovely dogs, are big powerful animals, who need owners experienced with larger breeds.
    Obviously I don't know what previous experience you have with dogs, if any.
    They can be, and often are wonderful family dogs, but you know absolutely nothing about this dog at all.
    You have a young child in the house and I really don't feel that you would be sensible in taking on this dog with a young child.

    As has been said, you can't just stick a muzzle on her, you would need to train her to be ok with wearing a muzzle and that takes time. And what will you do, if you do find that although she's muzzled, so you have some degree of protection, she is aggressive towards the cat or your baby? Will her original owners take her back?

    Unfortunately , some people who put their dogs up for rehoming aren't always totally honest about their reasons for doing so. It may be that these people do genuinely have health issues that mean they can no longer care for the dog, but there could other reasons they want to rehome her.
    She could have aggression issues, health problems, or severe separation anxiety, there are many problems a dog can have that make some dogs difficult to cope with and some just can't or don't know how to deal with these things so pass the problem onto somebody else, often without disclosing all the facts.
    You could potentially end up with a very difficult dog, which will cause you a lot of stress, heartache and possibly money.

    You would do much better in my opinion to visit a reputable rescue/ rehoming centre and go down that route to find a dog to add to your family. They will be able to match you with a dog who will fit into your family and lifestyle, plus you will have ongoing help and support should you come up against any problems in the future.

    Please think very carefully about this.
    I do wish you all the best in finding a dog to add to your family, I just don't feel this dog would be the most sensible choice at this time.
    Good luck.
     
  7. StormyThai

    StormyThai Moderator
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    If she will be your first Dobe then I would avoid this time I'm afraid.
    Private rehomes can work BUT the reasons that are given for rehoming are usually not true so you end up with behavioural issues that you may have to work through...sounds like she isn't cat tested and just plonking a muzzle on her a few days will not go well for the Dobe or your cats (muzzle punches can be nasty too)...
    Depending what lines she comes from she could be a high drive dog that NEEDS to be worked or she may be full of potential health issues for you to deal with!

    If you really want a Dobe then you need to find one in a rescue that has been temp tested and gives you back up if things don't work out OR you need to source a reputable breeder using the lines that would give you the best dog for your situation that is health tested.
     
  8. Ian246

    Ian246 PetForums VIP

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    I would also advise against responding to a private advertisement - you simply have no idea of the true story regarding the dog. If these folks were genuine, the best advice for them would be to hand the dog over to a rescue centre (breed-specific, or otherwise) who can undertake a proper assessment of the dog. Given that you have a cat and a small child, I'd exercise extreme caution taking on a dog who's history you cannot reliably know.
    IF you really do want a dog and you do want an older dog (as opposed to buying a puppy), then please contact a local rescue centre and talk to them (or find a Doberman rescue if it's a Dobie you particularly want - I'm sure there must be one.) Sure, any rescue cebtre will be dependant on what the previous owner's (if there are any) can/will tell them about the dog - but a reputable rehoming organisation will also do their best to assess the dog, assess any potential owners and make sure the dog goes to a suitable home; likewise, they will hopefully make sure potential owners are suitable for a particular dog. Granted, it's far from being a precise science, but it's got to be better than buying (presumably) a dog from someone who's advertising it on the Web and who you have absolutly no reason to trust.
    Finally, why do you want a Dobie? There's some stuff on breed characteristics here: https://www.hillspet.co.uk/dog-care/dog-breeds/doberman. I'll highlight one bit: "Doberman pinschers are powerful, energetic dogs that need plenty of exercise. If not exercised, they are likely to become irritable or even aggressive. Careful socialization and obedience training from a young age are essential." (My italicisation). That does not sound like an ideal dog for a family with a young child. It can, of course, extend to any dog breed - but there are some which do not need so much exercise, and/or are rather more relaxed about life. Can you honestly give a Dobie (or any energetic breed of dog) the time and the exercise it needs, especially as you have a small child to look after? If not, you may be setting yourselves up for a dangerous situation. Has this dog been properly socialized? What is the standard of its obedience training? I'd be asking these questions and more before I took on such a powerful dog.
    You may also want to check out this web site: https://www.pets4homes.co.uk/pet-advice/doberman-pinschers-do-they-make-good-family-pets.html.
    Dobies are not recommended as good pets for first-time owners. I don't know if you've had dogs before or why you are looking at this specific breed, but it clearly needs some very careful thought.
    Good luck with whatever decision you make.
     
    #8 Ian246, Jun 15, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
    Zenia, Burrowzig and tabelmabel like this.
  9. Zenia

    Zenia PetForums Newbie

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    Thankyou everyone for your replies. We weren't able to get her anyway but maybe that's for the best. Of course we would have inquired about if she was muzzle trained/good with babies ect but as many of you have said the previous owner isn't always reliable. We were really trying to rehome a shelter dog but pretty much all shelters in the area refuse to sell to people with young children and puppies are few and far between it seems. I also appreciate your concern as to us getting a doberman, we have been researching the breed extensively and since one of our main motives for getting a dog is to have a walking/exercise companion we think the breed will be suitable. You've all been very helpful and given us some things to consider in the future if we see any other older dogs for sale/adoption. Thanks again!
     
  10. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    Sorry it didn’t work out but I’m sure there’s a dog out there somewhere for you.

    If you’re after an exercise companion then there are many, many, many breeds that would fulfil this requirement while being significantly more likely to fit comfortably into your situation, particularly if you’re looking at private rehomes.

    Good luck with your search.
     
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