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Neutering

Discussion in 'Cat Breeding' started by Rachellouisemcf, Jul 12, 2019.


  1. Rachellouisemcf

    Rachellouisemcf PetForums Newbie

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    Hi everyone I just signed up to this chat so I'm pretty new to everythin but I have a load of questions if anyone is willing to help me OK here I go
    I have a 2 year old bengal girl called Cleopatra (Cleo for short). I bought her as a pet. Recently I've been thinking about getting her some company. I would really love for her to have some kittens someday. I've contacted a few people about boy kittens but the only affordable ones are neutered and a lot of breeders seemed annoyed when I explained my situation One person told me that "you can't simply throw one bengal cat to another and hope for the best", I'm not even sure what that means if anyone can help me???
    Another person told me that "breeders spend thousand's of pounds researching and testing cats for breeding purposes and if I had kittens without being on the active register then I would be known as a backstreet breeder
    I'm obviously offending people when I tell say this but I don't understand why??
    I simply want a boy cat(Phoenix, I've named him already ) to be Cleo's partner for life as she needs some form of cat company and I would like them to have kittens at some stage which I think is reasonable enough
     
  2. LinznMilly

    LinznMilly Moderator
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    Hi, welcome to PF. :)

    It's great that you're doing your research first. That's very refreshing. I don't have cats - I have dogs, but so very often, we get threads in which the breeder (even if you only breed once, you're still a breeder), signs up when it's too late, the cat/dog is already pregnant, and they've run into problems.

    It's also great to hear that you're getting told "no" from breeders who already have litters on the ground and that their male kittens are either already neutered, or you're being rejected for thinking about breeding.

    I'm aware that that's probably not what you want to hear, but as a forum, it's great to see breeders, possibly outside the forum, putting their kittens' needs above your own. I'm sorry if that stings, but it's true.

    The breeders are right when they tell you that they (or at least good) breeders spend a great deal of time and money researching and health testing their breeding cats. I'm not entirely sure if it's the same for cats as it is for dogs, but I know dog breeders travel the length and breadth of the country for the right stud for their bitches. This means choosing a male that perfectly compliments their female - i.e., where a female is less than perfect, the male is brilliant - and vice versa.

    Health tests cost a lot of money - they involve x-rays and blood tests and specialists - not just a once-over from the vet down the road who checks the dog or cat has 4 legs, a tail, a heartbeat and reproductive organs.

    Ethical breeders - the ones who do all of this - are doing this for the benefit of the breed - not for themselves, or because they think their pet wants puppies or kittens (they don't - the owners do).

    There's another issue that you don't mention, that ethical breeders are acutely aware of - there's no shortage of cats in rescue centres up and down the country, looking for homes - not just adult moggies, but pedigree cats and kittens. We live in a "throwaway" society, where it's oh so easy to buy a dog or cat, get bored, and dump them onto a rescue when they get bored/the cat scratches the furniture/something better comes along. Time honoured and tedious. :Meh

    Ethical breeders are aware of this, and will do anything in their power to keep their puppies and kittens out of rescue at any stage in their lives, even if it means taking the adult pup or kitten back.

    Depending on your personal circumstances, it may be in your cat's best interests to get another cat- for company, as a playmate - not as a "partner". That's anthropomorphic. Cats and dogs don't want a "partner". They have no concept of romance and marriage. Nor do they want" babies". We as humans, think they do, but they don't. They're driven by a biological instinct when they come into season, but when they're sitting on the windowsill, looking at the birds or the trees or the traffic, they're not day-dreaming of the pitter patter of tiny paws. ;)

    I hope that answers some of your questions. Others who know much better than I will be along shortly to be specific.
     
    #2 LinznMilly, Jul 12, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2019
    chillminx, Mrs Funkin, AmsMam and 7 others like this.
  3. spotty cats

    spotty cats PetForums VIP

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    What you’ve been told is correct.

    Your girl was purchased as a pet and should be spayed, you’ve gone against that breeders conditions by keeping her entire.

    Spay her and get a neutered pet for her company.
     
  4. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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    I'm sorry this might sound harsh but please listen to what experienced and dedicated breeders are telling you.
    I assume you bought Cleo as a pet - not on the active register for breeding - so even if you could find a mate for her you would be breaking the agreement you made when you got her.
    A lot of work goes into breeding. Pedigrees are checked for inbreeding, there are breed specific health tests to be done as well as general health checks for sexually transmittable diseases. It is quite correct to say you cannot just put two Bengals together and hope for the best and the same can be said for any breed.
    A female cat does not need to have kittens and by the age of two your girl will have been sexually mature for a while and running the risk of pyometra (an infection in the womb) and increasing her risk of mamaray cancer. She may also begin to develop unpleasant marking habits. It really is for the best to get her spayed as soon as possible.
    Also cats do not mate for life. A stud cat needs several girls to keep him happy. The majority spray to mark their territory and some can become aggressive if they are frustrated.
    If you feel that Cleo would benefit from a companion you could look for a neutered kitten.
    If you are really interested in breeding then talk openly to some breeders about it but be prepared to have to wait before a breeder will trust you and accept that you have a genuine commitment and not just wanting to breed because you think it would be nice to have kittens.
     
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  5. Mmb1004

    Mmb1004 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi,

    I am new here too, and I have much less experience with cats than dogs but I feel I know enough to go along with what others are saying.

    Breeding your cat(s) or dogs because you think they have a great personality is actually not reasonable. Too many perfectly healthy animals are put to sleep every day because there aren't enough homes for them. I am absolutely in favour of responsible breeders,but as you have been told, it is an expensive to be done correctly as there are a myriad of health tests that need to be done. You also would need to be researching the bloodline of both cats to ensure they were likely to produce healthy kittens that at "better" than their parents. It is not an endeavour to be taken lightly.

    Your cat may or may not want a companion; many cats are perfectly happy as only cats but getting another cats is reasonable but don't think of it as a partner. Cats mating is actually a fairly unpleasant process for the female (male cats penises have little hooks on the end so the female screams when he withdraws, this induces ovulation), and then there is the obvious possibility of complications in pregnancy and birth.

    So, in short, it is good of you to be looking for more information and do research, but I think the guidance you have so far been given is correct. I am sure Cleo is lovely but you are much better off someday getting another cat from her breeder (assuming they are among those doing health tests etc) than trying to breed a litter yourself. I can assure you Cleo will not feel unfulfilled at all to be spayed and never have babies!

    I hope you aren't taking offense at this, I am only meaning to educate. I have a lovely purebred dog who my husband would have loved to breed but he is neutered as, despite how perfect we think he is, he is too small and thus probably wouldn't contribute to the breed as a whole and also we don't have the funds to run all the health tests or actively campaign him on the show circuit.

    And our moggie kitten has an appointment to be neutered the day he 16 weeks old, the soonest our vet will do it. He is the sweetest cat but absolutely should never sire kittens.
     
  6. Rufus15

    Rufus15 ~ Orrono Maine Coons ~

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    Can't add any more to the advice already been given.

    There's no reason to breed your girl. Leaving her entire is leaving her at extremely high risk of pyometra, womb and mammary cancers, all of which will kill her.

    Neuter her, for her own benefit and health.
     
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  7. Rachellouisemcf

    Rachellouisemcf PetForums Newbie

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    OK I obviously had no idea about any of the above. Thanks everyone for filling me in and I have also decdied to get Cleo neutered.I was totally unaware of the risks involved by not neutering her. And when i heard that mating was painful for the girl that totally changed my mind. I would also like to say that I genuinely thought breeding was an ongoing thing and I never thought that if I let her have one litter that I would be classed as a breeder. Thanks again.
     
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  8. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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    Thank you for taking the time to listen and to understand.
     
  9. Mmb1004

    Mmb1004 PetForums Newbie

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    Very happy that you took the time to learn first! I am sure if Cleo could talk, she would be grateful to be spayed and pampered for life rather than taking care of babies and having boys harassing her :)
     
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