Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Neutering male dog

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Adon, Jan 4, 2012.


  1. Adon

    Adon PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2011
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hi there never had male dog and looking for views pls.
    Harvey is great pup, over friendly but really lovely temperament. Vet recommended neutering at 6months which is now.
    Have been told and read mixed views on this
    Friend told me to get him done as he will wander, but there are no dogs where we live. She also said he will start marking indoors and humping, neither of which he had ever done.
    Someone else said it will ruin his character and energy, change him for the worse.
    Any views on if and when to neuter please
     
  2. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    15,187
    Likes Received:
    8,996

    No such thing as being over friendly.

    I have had neutered and entire males.

    I would never castrate a dog prior to puberty unless there were overwhelming environmental reasons to do so eg

    I had no control
    No fenced garden
    lived with entire bitches.

    There are lots of old wives tales about castration the majority of which are entirely unfounded.

    What IS true is that there are pros and cons to neutering, but IMV there are more cons to neutering prior to physical maturity.

    Testosterone governs more than the ability to procreate, neutering a dog too early will delay the closure of the growth plates and means they often grow taller.

    Here is a link about early neutering


    Canine Sports Productions: Early Spay-Neuter Considerations for the Canine Athlete

    also see here:

    The Behavioral Effects of Canine Castration
    An Owners Guide by Hazel Palmer (1993)

    Throughout this document the importance of accurate diagnosis and supporting behavior modification techniques have been stressed.


    To this end your veterinary surgeon may wish to refer you to a member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers who will be able to advise you.
    INTRODUCTION

    Owning a dog is a pleasure but, increasingly, owners are made to accept responsibility for their dogs' behavior- both legally and in terms of social awareness. Consequently, many of them seek ways to prevent their dog causing a nuisance and wish to know how to cure or, better still, avoid the behavioral problems they do or could encounter.
    To this end neutering is often considered. However, as there is “no going back!” many owners seek information about the possible effects before making a decision. This owner's guide has been designed to give a basic understanding of neutering, the behavioral problems it may help to prevent/cure and those it is unlikely to affect. It also outlines possible side effects so that an informed decision can be made in consultation with the veterinary surgeon.

    HORMONES - what makes a dog male?THE UNBORN PUPPY: the main hormone involved in determining whether a puppy displays male rather than female behavior is testosterone. Late in development the male fetus generates a surge of testosterone which has the apparent effect of masculinizing areas of the brain (Hart & Ladewig 1979). So, in addition to the obvious physical differences, puppies are orientated to masculinity by alterations in the brain before birth.

    THE MALE ADOLESCENT: behavior variations can be identified between the sexes even in very young puppies. In the male puppy testosterone is increasingly produced by the testes so that by 6-7 months (i.e. puberty) the levels of this hormone are high enough to activate secondary sex characteristics such as leg lifting, mounting and aggression which will enable it to compete, mate and reproduce in adulthood.

    WHAT DOES NEUTERING MEAN?The term neutering or CASTRATION in reference to male dogs is the surgical removal of the testes during a minor operation, performed under general anesthetic. Usually a dog is admitted in the morning and collected later the same day. He may have several stitches which will be removed after about 10 days.

    WHAT ARE THE MAIN REASONS FOR NEUTERING DOGS?

    1. OWNER RESPONSIBILITY RELATING TO POPULATION CONTROL. Thousands of unwanted dogs and puppies are destroyed every year, many from litters born as a result of "accidental mating". To prevent further unwanted puppies being born most Dogs' Homes now specify that dogs must be castrated and bitches must be spayed, either before re-homing or at a later stage, as part of the new owner's agreement to adoption.

    2. MEDICAL/HEALTH.Veterinary surgeons may recommend castration for several medical conditions including testicular tumors, enlargement of the prostate gland, certain types of anal tumors and cryptorchidism ( retained testicles:- if the testes have not descended into the scrotum by about 10 months of age they are unlikely to do so and are prone to tumors in later years

    3. UNWANTED DOGS:If you visit a home for unwanted dogs you are likely to see more dogs than bitches. Many will be between 1-3 years of age. One of the reasons owners frequently give for re-homing relates to the behavioral problems mentioned below.

    4. BEHAVIOURAL PROBLEMS.As their puppies change to adolescents and then to adults, owners are sometimes surprised by changes in behavior particularly if they are objectionable. Changes may become apparent from the age of 6-7 months to full social maturity between 1-3 years dependent upon the breed of dog.

    Of course not all male dogs become difficult as they mature but we should be aware of the potential for change.

    Sometimes owners feel that their dogs suddenly act in an unacceptable manner but problems normally develop gradually. The first sign of change is often a lack of obedience. The puppy that used to stay close to its owner on walks and came when called may turn into an adolescent who is independent and more interested in playing with other dogs and bitches than staying with his owner. He may also become increasingly involved in "disagreements" with other dogs, even those he played with as a puppy.

    At home, young male dogs can become increasingly difficult to live with. Examples of the most frequently mentioned problems are:
    • An increasing possessiveness over toys, stolen articles or food and growling at the owners in an attempt to defend them.
    • A general reduction in response to the owner’s commands and an increasing tendency to boisterous behavior.
    • An increase in aggressive territorial behavior towards visitors.
    • A puppy originally introduced as a companion for an older male dog can become increasingly aggressive towards it.
    • Previously house trained puppies may start to lift their legs and urinate on the furniture.
    If a dog's behavior becomes difficult or unacceptable during maturation owners should contact their veterinary surgeon. If it has not already been considered as a preventive measure, the topic of CASTRATION may be mentioned for the first time. Some owners ask for their dog to be castrated because they feel it will solve all their problems but are surprised to hear that in most cases castration alone will not turn their dog into a perfect pet. Behavior modification techniques are nearly always required to reverse problem behaviors that have been learnt. These can otherwise be perpetuated through habit and inappropriate owner interaction. The problem behaviors which are most likely to be improved by castration are SEXUALLY DIMORPHIC.

    SEXUAL DIMORPHISM: what is it? Many behavior patterns are common to both dogs and bitches, such as tail wagging, grooming, play and greeting. SEXUALLY DIMORPHIC BEHAVIOURS are unique to, or typical of, each sex, e.g. bitches display a variety of characteristics that relate to their estrus cycle and maternal care which are not seen in male dogs. There are behaviors which occur more commonly in male dogs such as scent marking, mate seeking, mounting and aggression.
    Before looking at problems where castration may or may not be helpful, we should first consider normal canine behavior.

    NORMAL BEHAVIOR. So called "problem" or "nuisance" behaviors are often aspects of normal canine behavior. However the environmental and lifestyle restraints under which we expect our dogs to live are often so unnatural, it is not surprising that canine drives and instincts can occur at unacceptable times and in inappropriate places with possible antisocial or even dangerous consequences.

    In the wild however these behaviors would have positive benefits for the domestic dog's ancestor, the wolf. Some examples are discussed below.

    URINE MARKING:In the wild marking territory with urine is a valuable method of keeping out intruders and avoiding the need for aggressive encounters with other packs. Domestic dogs urinate to inform others which areas they regard as their territory. Urine is normally deposited on prominent, vertical places in the environment such as lamp posts and trees. The superior canine sense of smell allows individuals investigating these marks to gain information about the status of the previous dog. The height of the urine mark may also denote status.

    TERRITORIAL AGGRESSION BETWEEN MALES:In support of the competition to reproduce and pass on their genes, males of most species are aggressive to strange males encountered in their territory. Domestic dogs have to meet other dogs on what they regard as their territory i.e. streets and parks they have scent marked, yet we expect them not to show aggression.

    AGGRESSION BETWEEN COHABITING MALE DOGS:In packs of wild canines, individuals either establish a hierarchy or one of them has to leave the group. In our homes the lack of space forces dogs into situations that would not occur naturally. Additionally the varying size and temperament characteristics of each breed and/or the owner's tendency to unwittingly upset the established pecking order can exacerbate the situation.

    MOUNTING:This is normal sexual behavior and a necessary function in the mating process.

    POSSESSIVE AGGRESSION:In the wild this may take the form of guarding food. In captive wolves it has been observed that alpha males tend to guard their potential mate at the high point of her estrus cycle and will subsequently guard her offspring. Dominant domestic dogs sometimes adopt their mistress as the surrogate "alpha bitch" (no comments please, Ed!) and attempt to prevent her "partner" from "interacting" with her. They may also guard new born babies as if they were their own, become possessive over food, toys and stolen items.

    ROAMING:Dogs may travel many miles to find a mate. The desire to roam is increased if a bitch in oestrus is detected, the scent of which can be carried over long distances.

    BREEDING SEASONS:Female wolves have only one breeding season per year, during January or February. At this time the normally stable pack structure may become unsettled. As a result of domestication and man's selective breeding female dogs come into estrus twice a year and in any month. Consequently males are frequently subjected to the smell of bitches in estrus which is an unnatural state of affairs. This can make them territorial, agitated, prone to aggression, off their food, difficult to control and of course sexually frustrated.

    CASTRATION - will it work?Research has shown that where castration is carried out response rates vary. Of the individuals that are likely to respond, some will do so within two weeks. The remainder will respond within six months (Hopkins 1976).
    The following are examples of situations which prompt owners to consider having their dog castrated.

    MY DOG IS AGGRESSIVE TOWARDS THE FAMILY. WILL CASTRATING HIM CURE THE PROBLEM? There are many reasons why aggression towards family members develops and determining the motivation can be difficult. It is very important to discuss the problem with your veterinary surgeon who may (if the aggression is identified as dominance aggression), advise on a program of treatment or refer you to a behavior counselor so that the style of owner/ dog interaction, which may have led the dog to assume dominance, can be altered to demote the dog without confrontation. (Confrontation can unwittingly cause more rather than less aggression.)
    Surveys have shown that dominance or rank aggression is seen more frequently in entire males than castrated animals, so your veterinary surgeon or behavior counselor may, in addition to the behavior modification program, recommend castration and/or a course of hormone treatment.

    MY DOG IS AGGRESSIVE TOWARDS VISITORS. WILL CASTRATION HELP TO PREVENT THIS? As with aggression towards family members the reasons for the behavior must be established by an experienced counselor. The dog may feel he has the RIGHT to guard the home and may behave in a generally dominant way, so castration may help (see above). Contrary to the fears of some owners, castration will not affect the dog's ability to be an effective watchdog. He will still bark if disturbed!
    Conversely, a dog may act aggressively due to fear. At the threshold the apparent success of the behavior causes it to become overt, i.e. most people who approach the house go away again. The postman is a good example of this. This in time may encourage overt displays of aggressive behavior to visitors allowed into the home. In this case castration will not help
    .
    MY DOG IS NERVOUS AND AGGRESSIVE TOWARDS STRANGERS IN THE STREET. WILL CASTRATION STOP THIS BEHAVIOUR?Castration is definitely not recommended as a cure for nervous or fear aggression. This condition is often caused by lack of socialization with people during the dog's early life, or due to subsequent bad experiences. It is not related to the dog's hormonal state. The implementation of behavior modification techniques is the only viable course of action.

    MY TWO MALE DOGS FIGHT. SHOULD I HAVE BOTH CASTRATED?Fights between dogs within the home are frequently due to them trying to establish a hierarchy. It may be that a younger dog is trying to assert himself over his older companion, or that both dogs are so similar in age, size and temperament that it is difficult for them to establish a pecking order. Fights are sometimes noisy with little physical damage but can become serious. Fights are most often caused by the owners, who upset the status quo.
    To cure the problem it is necessary for the owner to acknowledge and reinforce the status of the dominant dog. Your veterinary surgeon or behavior counselor will advise how to achieve this. In most cases owners also have to learn how to establish themselves as dominant over both dogs which helps to inhibit their inclination to fight with each other.

    Castration can be helpful in these cases but it is important to identify which dog is most likely to assume the more subordinate role and castrate that dog first to increase the status gap. If the problem is not resolved in a reasonable period of time and the other dog continues to be aggressive it can be castrated as a very last attempt.

    MY DOG IS FINE WITH OTHER DOGS WHEN HE IS OFF THE LEAD BUT AGGRESSIVE TOWARDS THEM WHEN HE IS ON THE LEAD. SHOULD HE BE CASTRATED? In the early development of fear aggression the dog is content that it can move away if threatened when off the lead. When it is on the lead this is not an option so the dog learns to use aggression to make the potential threat go away and because he is usually successful the level of aggression can increase and may eventually become so overt that it is displayed off the lead as well.
    Castration is unlikely to alter this behavior as it is related to fear rather than hormone status. Castration may even exacerbate the problem in individuals that subsequently attract other dogs and provoke further fearful behavior (see "Are there disadvantages to castration).

    MY DOG IS AGGRESSIVE TOWARDS OTHER DOGS WHEN HE IS OFF THE LEAD. SHOULD HE BE CASTRATED? If he is aggressive to both sexes it may be that he was not socialized properly as a puppy and his behavior is due to a lack of canine social skills. A lack of socialization or the memory of being attacked may result in fear aggression which may be non-discriminatory or restricted to individuals resembling the breed of the original attacker. In these cases castration is unlikely to help. If the aggressive behavior developed after the dog reached maturity and is orientated specifically towards other males, castration is likely to help. It is believed to work in three ways:
    • Castration may improve the aggression threshold i.e. a greater level of provocation is required to trigger aggression.
    • It reduces the desire to dominate.
    • The dog smells less masculine and challenging so other dogs are less likely to act aggressively.
    Behavior modification techniques must always be considered as part of the cure whatever the cause of aggression towards other dogs. Even if castration is indicated, learned behavior will have to be counter-conditioned.

    MY DOG FREQUENTLY LIFTS HIS LEG AND URINATES IN THE HOME. WILL CASTRATION REDUCE THE PROBLEM? This problem can develop in male dogs once they reach puberty. It usually occurs in regular locations, normally vertical ones such as curtains, the legs of chairs etc. Urine marking may often be triggered by the presence of another dog, an in season bitch in the vicinity, the introduction of new furniture, or even visitors legs or shopping bags which have the smell of other dogs on them. Scent marking may also occur in new locations such as another person's home.
    In a survey relating specifically to urine marking in the home, castration was found to be effective in 81 % of cases (Palmer).

    Scent marking in the home is seen more frequently in small dogs than large ones and is often related to dominance. A behavior modification program to lower the dog's status may be required in conjunction with castration.

    MY DOG CONSTANTLY STOPS TO URINATE ON TREES, POSTS AND WALLS. HIS BLADDER MUST BE EMPTY BUT HE STILL MANAGES TO SQUEEZE A DROP OUT.This behavior is caused by a dog's desire to leave his scent in the areas that he regards as his territory. Primarily you should increase control over the dog to prevent this behavior - after all it is you as "top dog" who should be scent marking the area. (Don't do it though, you'll get arrested! Ed. ). Significantly, some owners observe that their castrated male dogs urinate less frequently, so castration can be recommended for this problem, but not in isolation. Improved owner status and control has a strong bearing on the situation.

    MY DOG IS DESTRUCTIVE WHEN I LEAVE HIM. WILL CASTRATION CALM HIM DOWN?Destructiveness is normally due to anxiety induced by owner absence (separation anxiety). Castration will not have any effect on this behavior. A few dominant dogs do become destructive as a result of frustration and annoyance at being left by “their pack". In conjunction with a behavior modification program, castration may help reduce the dog's desire to dominate, but these cases are rare. A careful study of your relationship with your dog and the type of damage it does should reveal the causes of the problem.

    MY DOG CONSTANTLY PESTERS AND SOMETIME MOUNTS BITCHES. WILL CASTRATION STOP THIS?Owners can be forced to keep their dog permanently on the lead to prevent this and the resultant decrease in exercise can create other problems. Castration can be very effective in these cases and frequently has a quick result. Many owners have commented that after castration their dog can be allowed off the lead and that they stay much closer, although dogs still need to be trained. Castration will not turn them into obedient dogs; it will only reduce the inclination to chase prospective mates.
     
  3. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    15,187
    Likes Received:
    8,996
    MY DOG CONSTANTLY ESCAPES AND STAYS AWAY FROM HOME. WILL CASTRATION STOP THIS?If your dog gravitates towards homes where there is a bitch rather than going on hunting or scavenging expeditions, the answer is yes. The reasons for this behavior are similar t those above. Castration is successful in about 90% of case (Hopkins). Dogs will travel long distances in search of a bitch and are a risk of causing road accidents. In addition, many dogs become lost every year and add to the numbers in dog's home throughout the country, so in this instance castration is responsible course of action.

    MY DOG MOUNTS PEOPLE'S LEGS. WILL CASTRATION STOP THIS?Mounting behavior is normal in puppies and is frequently triggered by hormone changes during puberty. It is often see when the dog becomes excited or after feeding. Young children are often mounted because their response is rewarding. They may laugh or scream and are unable to push the dog away. If the behavior continues in adulthood then castration is advisable. It is successful in 90% of cases (Palmer). In some dogs mounting can be an extension of dominant behavior, in much the same way as rape in our own species is related to power and not sex. If there are other dominance problems with the dog, such as aggression, behavior therapy will be required.

    MY DOG MOUNTS THE CUSHIONS WHEN HE IS EXCITED. WILL CASTRATION STOP THIS?This behavior (which is pleasurable for the dog) is frequently associated with items such as cushions, a blanket or even a large fluffy toy! If mounting continues after puppyhood and causes concern then castration is advisable. In one survey (Palmer 1989) great improvement was seen in 87% of dogs. Dogs will sometimes display this behavior purely as an attention seeking device so it is important to ignore it and if necessary remove the item or items for a while.

    SHOULD I USE MY PROBLEM DOG AT STUD TO RELIEVE HIS FRUSTRATIONS?It is a fallacy that allowing a dog to mate will stop problem behaviors. In many instances things get worse as the dog's sense of status and his interest in bitches is increased. To avoid unwanted puppies only those dogs which carry very desirable traits should be used at stud. These may be show dogs that are proven to have good temperaments or those known to produce good working lines.

    IS IT CRUEL TO TAKE AWAY A DOG'S DESIRE FOR SEX?In the vast majority of cases pet dogs are not allowed to mate but their instinctive drive can cause problems and frustration. Once the drive to reproduce is removed by castration, dogs seem more content. They have no abstract concept of what they are missing.

    I HAVE A MALE DOG BUT HAVE NOW OBTAINED A BITCH WHICH I MAY WANT TO BREED FROM. SHOULD 1 HAVE THE MALE CASTRATED?It is increasingly common to own more than one dog to provide companionship for them while the owners are at work. Owners who have a male dog as well as an entire bitch will encounter problems when she comes into season. Male dogs can suffer greatly at this time. They may go off their food and have been known to break through doors, jump through windows or even scale incredible heights to reach "their" bitch!
    If you wish to keep a bitch entire because of the desire to breed from her then having the male castrated will at least avoid the mental anguish he will go through every season.
    It is important to remember that, if the dog is castrated close to the bitch's season, they should be kept separate as fertile sperm may be present for several weeks following surgery.

    MY NEIGHBOURS HAVE A BITCH AND MY 7 YEAR OLD DOG HOWLS AND WILL NOT EAT WHEN SHE COMES INTO SEASON. IS HE TOO OLD TO BE CASTRATED?No, castration has been found to be effective for this type of problem even in older dogs.

    ISN'T IT UNNATURAL TO CASTRATE DOGS?Yes, but it is also UNNATURAL to bring up male dogs in an artificial environment and expect them not to behave like male dogs! It is surely kinder to ensure that they do not have urges they are not allowed to express for fear of producing yet more unwanted puppies?

    MY VETERINARY SURGEON SUGGESTED THAT HORMONE TREATMENT MAY CHANGE MY DOG'S BEHAVIOUR. WHY?It is possible to alter a dog's behavior by the use of synthetic hormones and hormone inhibitors. These treatments are normally given in the form of injections or tablets. Hormone treatment can give owners time to modify the way they interact with their dog to change its behavior without the need for castration.

    CAN HORMONE TREATMENTS BE A GUIDE TO THE EFFECT OF CASTRATION?Yes, responses such as decreasing levels of aggression and a reduction in urine marking are indicative of the changes that surgical castration can bring about.
    However hormone treatments can also have the effect of calming via the central nervous system. Improvements in behavior may be observed because of this rather than a change in hormone balance which makes determining the true effect of castration less than certain.

    Some hormone treatments can cause dogs to become hungrier so if food guarding is an existing problem, it is best to avoid these.
    Sometimes a veterinary surgeon will recommend hormone treatment as well as surgical castration to help calm the dog during the time it takes for neutering to become effective. If the dog's behavior regresses shortly after neutering, a repeat of the hormone treatment may be necessary.

    THE RIGHT TIME FOR CASTRATION.Castration can help alter a dog's behavior at any age after puberty, but it is important to remember that castration will not have an overnight effect. Improvement may take several months and inappropriate learned behaviors will need to be changed using behavior modification techniques.

    CASTRATION OF YOUNG MALE DOGS.It is becoming increasingly popular to castrate male dogs at a young age, as a preventive measure. The optimum time is just after the dog has reached puberty and started to lift his leg to urinate. This is a policy which has been employed by Guide Dogs for the Blind for many years.

    WHAT ARE THE DISADVANTAGES OF CASTRATION?In some dogs, there may be coat changes that necessitate more frequent grooming to stop the coat matting. In some short coated breeds the hair may appear to be thinner in places.
    Some neutered male dogs become sexually interesting and are occasionally pestered by other males. It is believed that after castration these dogs smell like a bitch. In a survey of 98 castrated males, 23 owners reported this phenomenon immediately after neutering. One year later the figure had reduced to 14 (Palmer).

    WILL CASTRATION CAUSE MY DOG TO PUT ON WEIGHT?No. However, after castration dogs can have an increased appetite leading the owner to give more food. In this case weight increase is due to overfeeding not castration. Many dogs do not need as much food to maintain their bodyweight after castration. Reducing the diet at the first sign of weight increase will prevent problems.

    I WANT TO TRAIN MY DOG TO WORK AND HAVE BEEN TOLD THAT CASTRATION WILL MAKE HIM LETHARGIC. IS THIS TRUE?No. In fact castrated males are frequently easier to train than entire males as they are less distracted. Lethargy will not occur unless he is allowed to put on weight.

    MY HUSBAND IS AGAINST CASTRATING OUR DOG. HOW DO I CONVINCE HIM?This is a common reaction due to what Freud called "castration anxiety", vicariously placed on the dog. Most men think of their own sex lives, cross their legs and grimace if the topic is discussed! They will, however, have female cats and bitches spayed and accept sterilization in their wives.

    Significantly, it is normally men rather than women who worry that castration will turn their macho male dog into a wimp! ( It won't! ) Hopefully the information on the preceding pages will counter this anxiety with rational thinking.
     
  4. ballybee

    ballybee PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Messages:
    6,313
    Likes Received:
    554
    I haven't neutered my dog, I don't see the point as he's very calm and thanks to my college course I found out it's actually better for male dogs to stay entire.

    Pros of neutering - dog can't breed, can't get testicular cancer, can reduce chances of having prostate problems and can reduce some behavioural issues.

    Cons of neutering - can actually cause behavioural issues, can cause weight gain, if done too early can cause problems with joints and bones as testosterone inhibits growth hormone allowing for correct growth rates, increases the chance of several different cancers occurring including bone cancers. Neutering too early can cause major nervousness and aggression and dogs take much longer to mature From being a puppy.

    If I was ever to neuter a dog it would have to be at least 2 years old as I'd want it fully mature both physically and mentally. My dog has never humped/roamed/marked inside or any of the other things said to be caused by being entire, every dog is different but at 18 months I'm pretty sure my boys not going to change, he lives with an entire bitch and has never been interested in anything other than playing with her, he's a very chilled out dog with no issues at all...I have no plans to neuter him and if I ever do neuter it will be down to either a medical issue or a serious behavioural issue that training won't help but neutering might.
     
  5. TabithaJ

    TabithaJ PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2010
    Messages:
    486
    Likes Received:
    7
    Since your dog sounds delightful, I'm bemused as to why your vet is recommending neutering. I could understand it if perhaps there were specific problems but as there are none.....

    My first dog, a Rough Collie, was entire. He never tried to hump anything, nor so much as glanced at a female dog. It's a myth that an entire dog will go rampaging through parks and woods, ready to pounce on any unsuspecting female :D

    My Lab was neutered before he came to me; he was 14 months when I got him so I don't know when precisely he was castrated. He is very highly strung and still pretty interested in female dogs!

    I would recommend waiting a bit and then you can always reconsider when your dog is a bit older IF you feel that neutering would be of benefit.
     
  6. terencesmum

    terencesmum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2011
    Messages:
    3,644
    Likes Received:
    47
    I don't think I'll neuter Terence. I don't see the point. I don't have an entire bitch (or am likely to have one in the near future) and there are no issues with him.
    I'd be far too nervous meddling with his hormones etc and would rather try to train bad behaviour out (if it was ever to occur).
    Also, humping hasn't got that much to do with him having his balls. There are plenty of bitches around who are ferocious humpers. ;)
     
  7. Adon

    Adon PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2011
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    2
    Thanks so much for your replies
    As we are so happy with him I don't think we will castrate not at the moment
     
  8. Pointermum

    Pointermum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    10,515
    Likes Received:
    476
    What breed is he? For a larger breed dog i wouldn't consider it for a long time like another year to 18m, even for a small breed i would wait 6 months to fully mature.

    Saying that Enzo is 20months now and has given me no reason to have him neutered, so his still entire and shall remain so unless he gives me a reason to ;)
     
  9. Adon

    Adon PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2011
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hi is golden retriever x , looks like a golden lab in shape n size :eek:
     
  10. terencesmum

    terencesmum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2011
    Messages:
    3,644
    Likes Received:
    47
    6 months is FAR too early to neuter a dog of that size. Sounds like a money-making scheme of your vet. I would maybe reconsider where you take him in the future. Some vets are a bit too quick with those procedures in my opinion. :eek:
     
  11. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Messages:
    29,098
    Likes Received:
    21,261
    6 months is much to young, I'm thinking about having Dillon done, he's 2 this month and I think he's to young. When he has this 12 month MOT I'll ask the vet about again, but I'm still not sure I want it done.
     
  12. haeveymolly

    haeveymolly PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    12,690
    Likes Received:
    321
    I certainly wouldnt do it that young to be honest, the youngest we have had done was 9 months, on vets recommendation. We decided not to get harvey done as he was showing no signs of needing it, when he was 6 he had an enlarged prostate something i never want to see a dog go through again and although there are the "against! neutering, for what harvey went through i wouldnt keep a dog intact, but do it at around 18 months.
     
  13. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    18,073
    Likes Received:
    13,986
    I dont think that is altogether fair. The majority of vets advise neutering every male dog at 6 months. I am not saying I agree with it, it is not what I was taught when I worked for a vet but I dont think you can say that it is a money making scheme or that changing vets will make any difference.
    It is up to the owner to decide if they want to go with their vets blanket policy or to research properly and decide for themselves what is the sensible option.
     
  14. Labrador Laura

    Labrador Laura PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,492
    Likes Received:
    754
    MY HUSBAND IS AGAINST CASTRATING OUR DOG. HOW DO I CONVINCE HIM?This is a common reaction due to what Freud called "castration anxiety", vicariously placed on the dog. Most men think of their own sex lives, cross their legs and grimace if the topic is discussed! They will, however, have female cats and bitches spayed and accept sterilization in their wives.

    Significantly, it is normally men rather than women who worry that castration will turn their macho male dog into a wimp! ( It won't! ) Hopefully the information on the preceding pages will counter this anxiety with rational thinking.


    That's the problem i have, My oldest labrador hasn't been done and due to lack of knowledge when he was a pup by the time i had met him at 2years old he had behaviour issues and still has a few now. He's dominate with 80% of dogs, i have to watch him with all males and i'm the only one who can let him offlead as i know from reading the dogs ahead which ones he'll get on with or wont get on with. He's not a fighter, or ever attacked another dog. But its the behaviour he displays that makes other dogs target him and now he has a sort of fearful/dominate issue. He's all word which i know isn't so bad, but i wish i could just tell him to relax and enjoy his walk and play with dogs. It's such a treat seeing him play with other dogs.
     
  15. cinnamontoast

    cinnamontoast Sois pas chiant, chéri.

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    12,129
    Likes Received:
    2,190
    This should be in Health where you would see that we all replied yesterday to someone else. However, happy to answer again as I feel very strongly about this.

    If you must (ask yourself why: is he humping? That's learnt behaviour and you need to train that out as he'll probably carry on even if neutered. Do you have a bitch?) leave him til 12-18 months. If you leave him whole, he won't grow as leggy (fewer potential joint problems therefore if left whole) as testosterone helps to close the growth plates earlier.

    The obvious reason for castration is potential testicular cancer, but this is external obviously and often fairly visual. The dog is at less risk from bone and other cancers if left whole.

    From personal experience, none of mine are neutered and one is quite an under-confident dog so taking away his bits might take away some of the little confidence he has.

    It's a personal choice, but I fail to see why it's routinely done as it's not necessary from a health POV. If the dog is an escape artist, it may help with roaming, but TBH, you should sort that with decent fencing (although my springers can get over 5 foot fencing, but choose not to).

    Your vet will tell you to do it because it's routine and the bread and butter money for him.

    As long as your fencing and recall are good, it seems pointless to neuter, but that's just my opinion.

    The vet recommends it because it's a standard bread and butter money for him/her, although proven to be less beneficial from a health perspective.
     
  16. Lexiedhb

    Lexiedhb Team Ginger!

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2011
    Messages:
    10,710
    Likes Received:
    9,322
    I think it is quite sad so many are now choosing not to neuter. I do hope all these entire dogs stay on leads, a dog with the scent of a bitch IMO will NOT recall, it only takes a moment for dogs to tie. Each to their own mind

    Equally as sad my OH's SIL is getting a labradoodle :skep: pup at the end of the month, when he will be 9 weeks old- he is coming to her castrated :frown2:
     
  17. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    15,187
    Likes Received:
    8,996
    I am afraid there are plenty of well trained dogs who when the scent a bitch will recall perfectly well, even when they are in season, many dogs are actually competed with bitches who are in season.

    As for the labradoodle coming already castrated I think it is appalling, knowing what I know about early neutering, and the reason it is coming already neutered is because the breeders do not want anyone making money out of their designer mongrels other than themselves.
     
  18. speug

    speug PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,952
    Likes Received:
    529
    actually, in their defence, not all vets will stick to the party line about neutering at 6 months. I had a chat with my vet about it when Angus was coming up to 18 months as there was no way I'd have had him done earlier than that and he suggested using the Tardak injection to see if it would sort our problems as otherwise he didn't see the need to have him done.
    Unless anything changes drastically in the future Angus will be staying intact as he's not interested in bitches (even the couple he's met while they were in season) and he got attacked more often when he was on the Tardak than he usually is when he isn't so we decided against it.
     
  19. ballybee

    ballybee PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Messages:
    6,313
    Likes Received:
    554
    My dog is 18 months old, lives with an entire bitch, has met multiple bitches in various stages of their season both on and offlead and has scented countless more as everyone thinks it's fine to walk an in season bitch on the popular walks around here....yet he's never run off or gone loopy or humped. I don't think you should be making blanket judgements when we all know all dogs are different.

    My dog is entire because after weighing up the pros and cons and looking at his lifestyle and personality I decided it didn't need to be done, as others have said testicular problems are often very obvious, bone problems are not so obvious and are much harder to treat.
     
  20. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    Messages:
    13,824
    Likes Received:
    408
    God I am so sick of vets and their ridiculous recommendations!!!

    There's no rush, his testicles will remain where they are are why not let the dog properly mature to at least 18 months? I can't understand why vets are so keen on neutering a dog so early - my vet said he would "do" T-Bo as soon as he could get purchase on his lil nuts - no way, he's one year old on Friday and his nuts are going nowhere for another few months, in fact if at all!

    If there is any truth in a dog not maturing properly if he is neutered too soon, if there is any truth in growth plates not developing properly without testosterone, if there is any truth in retaining puppy behaviour if neutered too early, then there is no need to do it until he is at least 18months old. If there isn't any truth in any of these statements then there isn't any harm done in waiting but if there is some truth in them, then there is a lot of potential damage to be done by removing that hormone too soon.

    In a single dog household I wouldn't neuter at all, none of my previous dogs were neutered and the only reason these guys are is because they live with many other dogs and hormones could stir up trouble. I have never had nervous male dogs before but I do now and I wonder if neutering is the reason why, even though they were done between 18months and three years. Never had a thundershirt in my house before in 40 years of dog ownership but do now. Sorry for the lecture but vets rile me sometimes.

    Err on the safe side and wait for maturity or don't do it at all! ;)
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice