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Need Puppy advice!

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by tigger2101, Aug 13, 2009.


  1. tigger2101

    tigger2101 PetForums Newbie

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    Hello, am new to all this !

    Me n my partner are thinking of getting a border terrier at the end of September. The only thing is that we both work full time, although one of us could always get home at lunch time. We would be walking the dog in the morning, lunchtime and have plenty of time with it in the evening.
    What i'm getting at is....how long is it before you can leave the puppy in the house on its own for a few hours?

    Any advice would be gratefully received !
     
  2. Spaniel mad

    Spaniel mad PetForums VIP

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    I personally wouldnt get a pup if you are working full time. even though you can pop home at lunchtime its still not what a puppy needs.

    They need attention and stimulation and a puppy left for that long can get bored and distructive
     
  3. rona

    rona Guest

    I'm afraid I wouldn't leave a pup for that long either.
    Have you thought about an older rescue dog or a cat?
     
  4. DevilDogz

    DevilDogz Guest

    I agree thats a very long time for a pup to be left..You will not be able to meet all the needs of the puppy if you are out that long and the pup is left at home alone..

    Like rona has said have you thought about an older rescue dog or maybe evan a cat.
     
  5. james1

    james1 PetForums VIP

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    You cant really leave a puppy round the house im afraid, the amount of attention you need to give them is equivolent to a baby. They stick things in their mouths, they try to get in places they shouldnt, they get bored and decide your favorite chair is going to be their next meal.
    Its not only the physical side of things ... they need interaction/stimulation, they need to know what is acceptable and what is not, they need to be let outside to do their business - other wise they are sat in their own mess.. and boredom can make them eat it.
    An older dog of the same breed would be better - but id advise take at least a week off work so that it gets used to you. You could possibly have a week off yourself then your partner a week after so that ground rules are made and you know a few of the characteristics of the dog.
    It is more than likely they will be house trained too. Rescue dogs arent full of the issues you think of - any pup can be full of issues really.
    Most rescues are there because, the owner couldnt spend time walking it, paying for it, some are the result of no sales after breeding ... the list is endless and the centres will walk you through each of their animals.
    Good luck though :)
     
    #5 james1, Aug 13, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2009
  6. Michelle666

    Michelle666 PetForums Senior

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    on a slightly brighter note for you Tigger. I have a pup and myself and the OH both work. Thing is one is usually up earlier than the other, and one is back before the other. Pup is fine on her own. We walk her in the morning and the evening. OH sometimes takes her too work, as hes a Builder so is outside quite often, but she seems to like laying in the back of the van LOL!
    I dont see it as a problem, my mum did it, my nan did, my OH's parents do it, and all their dogs are wonderful dogs!
    good luck!
     
  7. aurora

    aurora PetForums Senior

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    when you first get your little bundle of joy at 8 weeks, it needs constant attention, taking out to the toilet etc, this needs doing as soon as the pup wakes up, after playing, immediately after eating and generally every 1-2 hours for the 1st couple weeks, then as they grow there bladders go a little bit longer between visits to the garden. Puppies ned company, they need attenditon and training, pupies can not be left for long periods of time until they are a much older dog, and then i try only to leave ours a maximum of 4 hours. but my OH works from home so this is very rare any way. I do feel that a puppy is not ideal for you at this time in your life, a youngster or older dog would be better, there are many border terriers looking for new forever homes, i would seriously consider getting one or going to see them at the rescue centre. some rescue centre will not rehome to fulltime workers unless they have plans in place to support the dog during the day, ie you coming home to walk it at lunchtime or having a dog walker in to do it.


    have a look at Border Terrier Welfare - Home page

    border's are great litle dogs and are very loving, they love company and being out with you doing stuff, and they also enjoy sleeping especially on your bed if they can.:wink5:

    it is not impossible to have a dog and work full time, as we all have to work, i just think a new puppy would not be the answer and it's not fair to the puppy

    good luck:)
     
  8. TabbyRoad

    TabbyRoad Banned

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    I took Pupternity leave from work. 6 months of being able to stay at home with Mabel and getting her settled etc and then went backk to work part-time.

    I don't believe anyone who works FT should have a puppy. There's always alternatives; rehoming an older dog for one and even that would come with the caveat of having a dog walker come in to take the dog out for at least an hour.
     
  9. JennieJet

    JennieJet PetForums Member

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    Hi.....I have to agree that if you are both working a puppy is not a great idea. My husband and I have waited 12 years and now finally the time is right as the kids are older and I now dont work. They need to be taken out so reguarly for wee's and poo's so they learn to be house trained. My puppy has only just grasped the toilet training at 5 months....please think about a lovely rescued dog who needs a loving home and can cope with being left. A puppy is like a baby and needs your constant attention......if they are bored your house could seriously suffer !!!
     
  10. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    Lots of people go to work and leave their dogs. Probably less owners on this forum because a lot of people on here dont work. Of course some become destructive and bark a lot so you cant guarantee it will work. It is a lot nicer for the dog if you have two but getting two pups is not a sensible option as it will make life difficult for you.
    I have a border terrier staying here with me now. Her owner has always worked and she used to take the pup in the car with her a lot of the time. She travels between jobs so was able to spend time with her. She is not in the least bit bothered about being left on her own, she is a delightful dog to have around.
    I am home most of the time nowadays but and with my current pup I arranged someone to come in if I was going to be out more than a couple of hours and that worked well. She is 6 months now and I am happy to leave her for 5 or 6 hours once a week though still prefer to get someone to let her out if I can. If I had to go to work all day but could get back at lunchtime I wouldnt be too bothered at this age but it would have been harder when she was a baby. I have done it before, in fact not even come back at lunchtime, but I had several dogs and they had a shed/kennel and run so house training or destructiveness wasnt a problem and they were not barkers.
    If you are happy to get up an hour earlier and walk/play with the pup for that hour then enclose in a small area with plenty of toys when you go to work and come home to spend time with the pup at lunchtime then it might work. Is there any chance you could get a dog walker in half way through the morning for the first couple of months.
    I would have thought at least 50percent of dog owners work full time and their dogs are fine so I would do what you feel comfortable with.
     
  11. Jacinth

    Jacinth PetForums Junior

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    Tigger 2101

    I think you'll find that rather than advice, you'll be told you shouldn't have a puppy if you work fulltime. This forum is full of people who clearly don't work and so have a lot more time to be judgemental. All I would say personally, is if you can get home at lunchtime you should be ok. Especially as they sleep most of the time early on. Take some time off when you bring him/her home first though! Good luck.
     
  12. Colliepoodle

    Colliepoodle PetForums VIP

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    No, this forum is full of people who love dogs, which is why they are here. Whether they work or not is irrelevent.

    I don't think anyone on here has ever said it is ALWAYS wrong to have a dog if you work. There are many factors to take into consideration; it isn't cut and dried.

    However, like it or not, it is NOT ideal to have a puppy if you work full time and can't arrange for doggy day care while you aren't there. Housetraining will take longer, there is more potential for destruction and however much you try to dress it up, it is NOT nice for a puppy to be left alone for hours on end. To try to pretend otherwise is self-deceiving.

    It CAN work, but more often than not it doesn't. That's all anyone is saying.
     
  13. SEVEN_PETS

    SEVEN_PETS PetForums VIP

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    I would say get an adult rescue dog who is used to being left. I don't think people who work full-time should have puppies, but most can have adult dogs. Look around the rescues for an adult border terrier. :)
     
  14. Colliepoodle

    Colliepoodle PetForums VIP

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    Yes, that's a good compromise.
     
  15. TabbyRoad

    TabbyRoad Banned

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    I'd like to stress that I think it's wrong to work full-time when you have a PUPPY.

    Once the dog has matured then as long as there is a dog-walker coming in to take the dog out for at leaast an hour it can, and does, work out very well for some people.
     
  16. Louby

    Louby PetForums Junior

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    i got my puppy 3 weeks ago, he was 12wks when i got him i took a week off work for the first week to settle him in and have been coming home every lunch time to play ball and let him go to the toilet. He is slowly getting the hang of waiting for me to get home to go to the loo now too [we have had a few accidents].

    He is dry through the night now [without crate training - he has a crate i just dont lock him in it]. He is always happy to see me and when i have to go back to work i tell him to come [into the kitchen] he sits, i say stay and he stays, then i leave for the afternoon.

    I have been coming home earlier than i did before i got him, and after i have been home half an hour at night he then has a manic attack in the garden running around like a loon. All his injections are done now so in a weeks time i can take him for walks in the morning, afternoon and evening as he only has the run of the garden at the mo.

    He hasnt become destructive whilst being left, i give him a stuffed bone in the morning and he is still munching on it when i get home in the evening.

    He is a yorkie x chichuahua so he is only little and doesnt need a huge amount of exercise to knacker him - bigger dogs would need more exercise - i would imagine.

    I hope it works out for you

    L x
     
  17. Jacinth

    Jacinth PetForums Junior

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    ColliePoodle

    I didn't say that anyone said you shouldn't have dogs if you work. I said that rather than advice, they'd be told they shouldn't have a puppy if they work fulltime and you've reiterated that. I'm just remembering the lambasting that someone else got when they said they worked fulltime and I didn't think that was helpful.

    I dont' work fulltime myself and I'm lucky enough to be able to work from home. However, I know lots of people who aren't able to do that and have to make other arrangements. I am aware that being at home all the time can in itself can have reverse problems in that I've had to make sure I go out for longer than I need to, just so that my puppy gets used to being left.
     
  18. Colliepoodle

    Colliepoodle PetForums VIP

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    Well unfortunately on a public forum you have to accept that you won't always get the replies you want. If people think that it is unfair to have a puppy and work full time, they are going to say so.

    People who are only interested in getting replies they like should try the American forums, where owners seem to think nothing of leaving puppies in crates for 12 hour stretches, just because they want a puppy.
     
  19. Jacinth

    Jacinth PetForums Junior

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    And equally, on a public forum you are entitled to express an opinion that doesn't necessarily agree with everyone.
     
  20. Colliepoodle

    Colliepoodle PetForums VIP

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    Yes, of course. And around and around it goes.
     
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