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Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by HailHeech, Sep 13, 2019.


  1. HailHeech

    HailHeech PetForums Newbie

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    Around almost a year and a half ago, we rescued a stray kitten. It has had a good life so far, she saw the vet very recently and she is in great health and was the correct healthy weight. We like her a great deal.

    Unfortunately, we held off just slightly too long to get her castrated, and she fell pregnant at 6 months. She had a litter of 5 babies, four boys and one girl. No complications. All of them are healthy and noisy.

    The problem is that she is a very territorial cat. When she started attacking her babies, we expected it because most queens go through that to start weening the babies. The babies still try and play with her no matter how she repels them. However, she is now getting aggressive towards everything, even the touch of us. Suggesting that she is very stressed out by her children being around. And now she has stopped coming home. She leaves for days and is noticeably losing weight because she doesn't like that these babies are always around her home.

    We have taken her to the vet, he said she is physically healthy. The babies are around 4 months old now and they are still clustering around the house and not leaving any space for the mother to relax out there. We need advice about this because we're concerned about her weight loss or that she might just stop coming back all together.
     
  2. Bertie'sMum

    Bertie'sMum Obedient Cat Slave

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    Has she been spayed now ? If not she'll soon get pregnant again !
    Do you intend to keep all of the kittens ? Or are you expecting them "to leave home" of their own accord !

    I suggest that you contact your nearest cat rehoming/rescue centre and sign the kittens over to them - they will very quickly find them all good homes and then Mama cat can have some peace and quiet :)
     
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  3. HailHeech

    HailHeech PetForums Newbie

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    She has been spayed. She was spayed as soon as she was able to after the pregnancy. The young girl is going to be spayed as soon as she reaches maturity. We are not expecting them to leave home. The kittens are all being kept by us. We have grown attached to them. Is there no way to mediate an understanding between them. They live on an open house with alot of space.
     
  4. Sheltie2021

    Sheltie2021 PetForums Member

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    I'm confused if u have had the cat 18 months and the kittens are 4 months old your cat would have been closer to 1 when she got pregnant not 6 months
     
  5. HailHeech

    HailHeech PetForums Newbie

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    I never said 18 months. I gave a rough estimate, she is a sexually mature young female. She was pregnant for around 3 months i believe. So she must be around 13 /14 months old.
     
  6. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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    That's a lot of cats sharing your home and sadly just because they are siblings it doesn't mean that they will get on together.
    The boys will need to be neutered soon before they develop the habit of spraying to mark their territory or before they decide to wander off in search of females.
    Of course you will have become attached to the kittens but I think it would be fairer to your girl to find them new homes. Maybe keep just one.
     
    ribbon and OrientalSlave like this.
  7. HailHeech

    HailHeech PetForums Newbie

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    Thankyou for your response. Our vet told us that it would be possible initially, because cats often wander and only come to feed they would find an understandimg. It's clear that that is not happening though. This is going to be a tough decision.
     
  8. Sheltie2021

    Sheltie2021 PetForums Member

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    Still doesn't make sence you said around 1 and a half years ago you rescued a stray so that's 18 months
    Was she a newborn when you found her?
     
  9. HailHeech

    HailHeech PetForums Newbie

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    About 2 weeks old, without a mother we found her. She came screaming up to my gfs feet begging for food. She is not a cuddly cat and even though you can see she trusts us, she is not a cat that let's it be known she needs us. But if you sit still long enough she may just park her squishy ass on your lap and purr.
     

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  10. Arny

    Arny PetForums VIP

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    Mothers quite often do not like their kittens when they grow older.
    As others have said I think it would be sensible to put the mother cats needs first and rehome her kittens. At 4 months most vets will neuter now, if at the correct weight which they certainly should be so you can get that done before finding homes or go through a rescue.
     
  11. Bertie'sMum

    Bertie'sMum Obedient Cat Slave

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    I've never had a mother cat and kittens but I do know that in the wild a mother cat will eventually drive her young away as they become competitors for, what she sees as, her resources.
     
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