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Name this dog breed... help!

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by Lydia_w92, Jul 3, 2017.


  1. Lydia_w92

    Lydia_w92 PetForums Newbie

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    We brought a "short legged jack russell" puppy in April this year. We apparently saw the mom and dad dogs which were short legged jack Russell's. As our dog was so small you couldn't tell he wouldn't have been.

    He is now 5 months old and now very clearly not a short legged jack russell. However, we are getting comments that he looks like a short haired fox terrier/fox hound. He is jack russell size, and hasn't grown much in the past couple of weeks. But we are wondering if he is a pure jack russell or if he is indeed cross bred.

    Let me know what you guys think...

    Also, is there a possibility that two short legged jack Russell's can produce a longer legged jr?
     

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  2. ouesi

    ouesi Guest

    I didn't know a short legged JRT was a thing?
    Pup doesn't look very JRTish to me. Does look fox terrier like...
     
  3. Lydia_w92

    Lydia_w92 PetForums Newbie

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    Yes they are a thing... they look ridiculously cute haha.

    I think it may be worth doing a dog DNA test? I've found a couple online.
     
  4. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    The KC breed standard doesn't refer to long or short legged JR's, just says that the height is 10" to 12". Also that the colour should be overall white with black or tan patches.

    Did the breeders claim they were KC breeders and did you receive a pedigree and other paperwork regarding the puppy?
    If not KC breeders then the parents of the puppy could have any kind of ancestry, it's highly likely that one of the grandparents of the puppy was a long legged dog that looked vaguely like a JR or that the bitch has mated with another dog
     
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  5. Lydia_w92

    Lydia_w92 PetForums Newbie

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    The lady we brought or pup from is a licensed breeder with the local council. Thankfully I noted down her licence ID. From the top of my head (as I'm at work and can't check), we only received medical papers from his first jabs and microchipping.

    However, we were sold a short legged jack russell, and apparently the older male and bitch which were their family pets, were the parents of the litter...
     
  6. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    It is entirely possible for short legged Parents to produce a longer legged pup.

    If one of the Grandparents were long legged, that would account for it.

    Some people deliberately breed short legged Jack Russells.
     
  7. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    If the breeders don't know the ancestry of their pets then they won't know really what any puppies they might have will look like. Sometimes traits from further back will reappear. Just because the parents were short legged it doesn't always mean that any pups they have will also be short legged unless the breeders know for sure that the grand and great grand parents etc etc were also short legged
     
  8. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    most Jack Russels have reasonably short legs, but that does not make them a separate breed and all a council license means is that the breeder is churning out puppies and producing enough litters a year to need a license. Your pup has too much brown on it to be a well bred JRT but as any white and brown terrier or even brown terrier of inderminate breeding is often called a JRT then you can call yours that too. What you do have is a very nice looking pup who you must love to bits and he is definitely a terrier which is what you wanted so enjoy him and do not worry too much about exactly what is in his breeding.
     
  9. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Until very recently the only Jack Russell Terrier that was recognised by the Kennel club and had a breed standard was the Parson Russell Terrier, These tend to be longer legged and are bread to a certain type or breed standard you can read about the Parson Russell below.
    http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/breed/display.aspx?id=3175

    The Jack Russell which is what you probably mean and tends to be much shorter legged and that you tend to see a lot more of out and about tends to be more of a type of working terrier, those until fairly recently were not recognised by the UK kennel club, there was no breed standard and they can vary a lot more in type. The Kennel club didn't recognise them until 2016, you can read more about the recognition and how they are now being recognised on this link
    http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/press-releases/2015/october/meet-britain’s-surprising-new-pedigree-dog-breed-–-the-jack-russell-terrier/

    If the parents are not pedigree parson russells which have been recognised for years and bred to a more standard and exact type, and instead are the Jack Russell which is a type rather then a breed (or wasn't until work and documentation is starting to be done but very recently) then that could be why he has longer legs, previous dogs used in his lines may have had longer legs and one or both parents (depending on the mode of inheritance for the short leg gene and how its passed on which I admit I haven't checked and modes of inheritance can vary) could be carriers of the long legged genes that could be why or would possibly explain it.

    The only other explanation would be that the dogs you saw might not both be the parents of the pup.
     
    #9 Sled dog hotel, Jul 3, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2017
  10. kirksandallchins

    kirksandallchins PetForums VIP

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    I would guess 99% of the Jack Russell's that are for sale at any one time are not KC registered. Even if both parents had short legs, depending on genetics it probably is possible to get longer legged puppies.

    I have recently seen Irish Jack Russell's for sale - which I didn't know existed. They have short legs and erect ears.
     
  11. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    They don't exist.
     
  12. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    I know someone who bred her short-legged Jack Russel bitch to a short-legged dog. One of the litter was quite long-legged, the others all had short legs. One has needed surgery on both back legs for luxating patellas (very common in Jack Russells) and another is 'affected' by primary lens luxation (the others will probably be carriers). I hope your pup was genetically screened for the lens luxation which good breeders should do as it can cause sudden blindness.
     
  13. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    What don't exist? Jack Russells with short legs and erect ears?
     
  14. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    I would guess that Sweety means Irish Jack Russels do not exist. For too long the breed name has been generic to any little terrier that looks roughly like one so it would be easy to find almost any characteristics and breed it in.
     
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  15. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    Yes, that is what I meant. :)

    Jack Russells originate from the West Country, not Ireland.
     
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  16. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    A JRT bred through the generations in working size ...will come out as working size. That is stocky body, strong, tenatious and short legged. Perfect size for rabbit holes.

    However JRTs bred with mixed sizes over the generations will produce a litter of variety .....even if the parents appeared smaller. Maybe there is a bit of Parsons in there.

    J
     
  17. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    The original Jack Russells, (formerly Fox Terriers), were long legged in order to be able to follow the hunt.

    If you look at pictures of the Reverend Russell's own terriers, they were of the Parson Russell type and this is the type originally recognised by the Kennel Club.
     
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  18. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    They're not exactly fresh off the block as a type though, and their area of origin is of no importance. There's plenty of time for Jack Russells in Ireland to have been selectively bred for somewhat different characteristics, and for those to be apparent - in the same way that 'Irish' Staffies look different to KC standard ones. It's not a proper breed as such, but I don't see that anyone has claimed it was.
     
  19. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    Black and tan terriers with erect ears aren't true Jack Russells.

    Because somebody in Ireland bred a small black and tan terrier and decided to call it an Irish Jack Russell doesn't mean it is a Jack Russell.

    The Breed Standard for both Parson and Jack Russell Terrier state that the dog should be predominantly white.

    Erect ears are a serious fault.
     
  20. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Until the KC recognised Jack Russells as a 'breed' last year, there was no real 'standard' and therefore no faults, serious or otherwise. They're a type; the OP made no mention of the Jack Russell in question being registered. The huge majority aren't so have no standard to meet.
     
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