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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been up since 6am this morning. My German Shepard has started having fits. She has been fitting every 2 hours ever since. Vet tells me it's common in her breed. I have never known it before and I have had them for years and so has my husband. She is now in emergency vets under sedation and having tests. :(
 

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it is common in certain bloodlines - not all
but there are other causes of seizures - certain drugs like Atopica can cause
toxins, trauma, infection, cerebellar abiotrophy (which is inherited)
 

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So sorry you are both going through this.

I hope some others come along to help you.

I haven't experience or knowledge I'm afraid, but if you need to off load, I'll check on this thread to offer support :)
 

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Been up since 6am this morning. My German Shepard has started having fits. She has been fitting every 2 hours ever since. Vet tells me it's common in her breed. I have never known it before and I have had them for years and so has my husband. She is now in emergency vets under sedation and having tests. :(
So sorry that you have had to experience this and go through it, its a very frightening thing. One of mine started seizuring just before two years old having grand Mal seizures. Hers turned out to be hypo thyroid low thyroid hormones that were causing it. I did quite a lot of research before we got the diagnosis, and I hope the following information and links will help.

Seizures and epilepsy are known in the German Shepherd, Causes can be whats known as primary idopathic epilepsy due to unknown cause, or seizures can be secondary to other underlying conditions.

Causes of seizure can also be down to age, True primary epilepsy seems to be most common in the ages of between 1/5 years although it still can be caused as a secondary symptom during this time as well.
For more details of Possible seizures according to age see link below
POSSIBLE CAUSES OF SEIZURES BY AGE

To rule out if the seizures are due to primary epilepsy of secondary to other underlying problems these are the basic tests.

Minimum Diagnostic Assessments for an Epileptic

History

Your description of the character and timing of the episodes, relation to exercise, feeding, etc.Helps your veterinarian determine if this is indeed a seizure and what type. May provide clues to the cause.

Physical Examination

Evaluation of the heart, lungs, abdomen, gum colour, etc.Provide clues to diseases which could cause seizures or complicate treatment.

Neurologic Examination

Evaluation of behaviour, co-ordination, reflexes and nerve functions.Provide clues to disease of the nervous system which may be causing the seizures.

Complete Blood Count
(CBC), routine serum
chemistry profile, and
urine analysis (UA)

Blood and urine samples are taken and analysed.Rules out metabolic causes of seizures and provides baseline data to monitor effects of medication.

Bile Acids Assay or
Ammonia Tolerance
Test

Usually, the pet is fasted and two blood samples are taken.Rules out liver problems and provides baseline data to monitor effects of medication.

Thyroid Function Test

Blood samples analysed for T4 and TSH levels.Optional, but would rule out thyroid disease as a cause.

Range of tests and examinations for diagnosis of epilepsy in the dog
Source: Canine Epilepsy Network

Should that not prove to find any underlying cause, then there are further specialist diagnostic tests, usually done by a neurologist specialist.

Specialist Tests for the Diagnosis of Seizures
Source: Canine Epilepsy Network

MRI or CT brain scan

Evaluate the structure of the brain; requires anaesthesiaRules out diseases such as brain tumours which would need to be treated directly

Spinal tap

Spinal fluid is collected and analysed; requires anaesthesiaLooks for infectious diseases and provides clues to other brain diseases

Antibody titers

Blood and/or spinal fluid is analysed for antibodiesIdentifies specific cause of an infection

Toxin tests

Blood or other sample is tested for the presence of a toxin.Tells if a specific toxin is present, but usually need a clue to what toxin to look for from the history or other test

Other laboratory tests

Advanced tests on blood, urine, or spinal fluid.Follows clues suggested by routine tests

Electroencephalogram
(EEG)

Recording of brain wave to look for the electrical storm.Allows definitive diagnosis, but can be non-diagnostic

Further really good websites that explain more, and also offer practical help and support etc are linked below:- There is also useful information what to do before, during and after seizures

Canine Epilepsy and Dog Seizures Table of Contents - Canine Epilepsy Guardian Angels

Canine Epilepsy Network

Canine Epilepsy Website
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone. spoken to the vets. she has had no more fits since 2.30 this afternoon.So no need to sedate her. She is now off the drip has been for a walk and having something to eat xx
 

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Thanks everyone. spoken to the vets. she has had no more fits since 2.30 this afternoon.So no need to sedate her. She is now off the drip has been for a walk and having something to eat xx
That is good to hear
sorry for what you and your girl are going through
my two year old Golden Retriever is on phenobarbitol for her epilepsy.

I found the canine epilepsy uk website very helpful and their is facebook groups you can join as well, it is nice to have the support of others, on this forum as well
 

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Thanks everyone. spoken to the vets. she has had no more fits since 2.30 this afternoon.So no need to sedate her. She is now off the drip has been for a walk and having something to eat xx
So glad for you all that the news from the vets is promising, hope she is OK.
 

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We lost a dog 4 years ago to fits and seizures, he had meningitis. We thought we had cured him one day he just had one fit, after another,after another so we contacted the vet and had him put to sleep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That is good to hear
sorry for what you and your girl are going through
my two year old Golden Retriever is on phenobarbitol for her epilepsy.

I found the canine epilepsy uk website very helpful and their is facebook groups you can join as well, it is nice to have the support of others, on this forum as well
That's what vet has put Sasha on. I will have a look at that website thank you :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
She is home and full of it. Picked her up at 10am. Had something to eat and has been wandering round in the garden for a while. You wouldn't think yesterday had happened. It's just good to have her home
 

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That's what vet has put Sasha on. I will have a look at that website thank you :)
She is home and full of it. Picked her up at 10am. Had something to eat and has been wandering round in the garden for a while. You wouldn't think yesterday had happened. It's just good to have her home
Good to hear it :) She sounds gorgeous, glad she is home
 
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