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my dog still doesnt listen

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by nikkiXkev, Jan 12, 2012.


  1. nikkiXkev

    nikkiXkev PetForums Newbie

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    i wrote about this yesterday. my dog humps his bed and we tell him over again but he goes straight back to it akso he is very hyperactive in living room we try giving him toys but he aint interested
     
  2. SEVEN_PETS

    SEVEN_PETS PetForums VIP

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    how much is he walked?

    what training do you do with him?
     
  3. Argent

    Argent PetForums VIP

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    You've given him all of 24 hours to get it - it takes pups usually the first 12 months of their lives to fully get into the swing of what is expected of them if you are a 'casual' dog owner. Some people are a lot more intense about their training and work on their dogs a lot harder, or are more experienced so the pup learns faster, but seriously, it will take months and months of repetition on your part, you can't lose patience with him or you'll never get anywhere. It's all part and parcel of having a puppy, they don't arrive with a household rulebook, you need to teach them, and when they get it right, make sure they know about it.
     
  4. nikkiXkev

    nikkiXkev PetForums Newbie

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    he is walked once a day but its a big walk for a puupy. we teach him to sit and other basic commands during the day.he is fine when he has his kong stuffed but when its gone it starts. i know he is a puppy but there must be somethimg i can do to prevent the hyperactivity.
     
  5. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    How old is this dog?

    What breed is he (if any)

    What do you feed him on?

    How many times?

    Who else lives in the house eg do you have children and if so how old?

    Why do you think the pup is hyperactive?

    Have you taken him to the vet?
     
  6. nikkiXkev

    nikkiXkev PetForums Newbie

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    he is 4months old and yes we have a 9 month baby but we dont have him in here that often when our son is around. we feed him on gilda puppy food and is fed 3 times a day. he is a labrador. he just repeatedly goes back to his bed and humps it bites it and there is no stopping him. if we leave him in kitchen he demolishes our walls
     
  7. Argent

    Argent PetForums VIP

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    Have you considered splitting his walk into two shorter walks either end of the day? It breaks up the period of time stuck in the house and he'll be more likely to calm himself when he's indoors.

    If he's just humping and biting his bed but not tearing it to bits and pulling the stuffing out of it or anything like that, I'd just ignore him and let him get on with it, he'll soon get bored - he might even do it because he enjoys the reaction out of you guys and the attention it gets him.
     
  8. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    If he doesn't often get to go in the room then it's going to be super-exciting for him when he does get to go in.

    I couldn't find gilda food online but check the ingredients - if it's full of grains and additives with very little meat then that could be making him a bit hyperactive too.

    Also, how long is the long walk? If it's excessively long then not only will it be bad for his joints, but he could be actually getting over-tired and too wound up. Does he sleep lots during the day?

    And like smokeybear said, it's a good idea to take him to the vet to check everything's ok if you don't think it's normal puppy behaviour.

    Good luck :)
     
  9. nikkiXkev

    nikkiXkev PetForums Newbie

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    i thought if a dog was humping then you are supposed to stop this unwanted behavior immdiatley. also we leave him in kitchen and i am in there every 2 mins because he is diving on benches. i will start taking him for shorter frequent walks to see if this helps my situation
     
  10. ClaireandDaisy

    ClaireandDaisy PetForums VIP

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    The best way to stop unwanted behaviour is to train an alternative. When he starts, distract him with a tug toy and play with him. He isn`t going to play on his own (hump the blanket) if you play with him because you are more fun.
    Pups should not have long walks - it put undue strain on the joints. Short walks at frequent intervals are better, and will lessen his boredom.
     
  11. Argent

    Argent PetForums VIP

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    Yep and it'll also make sure he doesn't build up too much stamina as well, so he'll wear down as normal rather than stay bouncing off the walls longer and longer.
     
  12. Gavs

    Gavs Guest

    Hi there,

    Our pup used to frequently hump her bed up until about 3 weeks ago, particularly after play or when she was a bit agitated. We had not been able to give her any lasting chews as she used to gobble them all in one and i was worried about rawhide etc. But recently we have tried her on circular rawhide and she is loving them and chewing as opposed to gulping.

    She is much happier and settled now, though we also give her a good run out in the park daily, play in the house with her, and try to fit in some training also.

    I wouldn't fret about your pup she maybe just needs an alternative and some more interaction?

    Gavs
     
  13. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Banned

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    Humping is the most natural thing in the world to a puppy and as long as he doesn't start humping people, I would certainly not make a big thing out of it. Ignore it. Dogs hump for all sorts of reasons, excitement, anxiety, as well as sexual, though he seems a little young for that. He is probably trying to calm himself down.

    He should not be having long walks at his age. The rule is 5 minutes per month of life per day, on lead. He can still play ball and stuff in the garden and do some training.

    Quite honestly, I think you are expecting too much of this puppy. He doesn't understand what is expected of him, nor is he likely to if you keep moving the goalposts. You need one method, ignore bad behaviour, distract him from it and reward good behaviour. But you need to stick to it for as long as it takes.
     
  14. ballybee

    ballybee PetForums VIP

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    It sounds like your pup is either overtired or understimulated.

    Do you have a crate? They are very useful as they confine an overtired pup and they soon nod off.

    if it's understimulation i'd suggest getting some interactive toys like a kong/kong genius, babble/zigzag ball(one makes noise when touched, the other moves on it's own), nina ottenson puzzle, treat dispensers like the kong wobbler etc etc.

    Make your pup work for his food, the kong wobbler would be useful here as you can just fill it up and watch him go nuts getting his food. I assume you mean gilpa food which isn't fantastic, theres a sticky in Health and Nutrition where you can find a better food for him. You can also use his food to do training or play games like find it(scatter food in a room or in the garden and let puppy loose to find it) as labs are well known for loving their food.

    I'd suggest something along the lines of 3 short walks a day, then mix up play and training sessions, a bit like this

    Walk
    Breakfast
    Play/training
    Lunch(maybe do some training or use the wobbler)
    Play/training
    Tea(again maybe do training/play with this)
    Walk
    Evening chew(pigs ear, bulls pizzle, rawhide etc)

    Make sure theres plenty of time for him to sleep as puppies really need sleep. Also if he's only humping his bed, remove the bed and leave down an old towel to see if that stops the humping. You can train him to be calm in the room, just remove him for a timeout whenever he gets too excited, just say "ah ah", put him out for about 20 seconds then let him back in, treat and praise when he's chilled out in the room so he gets the message.

    With his kong, have you tried freezing it? You can also do things like smear honey/peanut butter/yoghurt inside the kong so he spends ages getting it all out.

    Have you ever considered raw feeding? You don't have to do it full time but you could swap his evening meal for a raw meal, raw meals take a lot of energy to eat so he'll be much calmer and should settle easily, my dog is 19 months old and is very capable of raw feeding but he still needs a nap fter a meal :blush:

    I hope some of this helps, you could invest in a longline so pupster can run about more on walks too but make sure you go to grassy/soft surfaces for him so his joints don't get damaged, the rule for on lead hard surface walking is 5 minutes per month but offlead(or longling) on soft surfaces you can go longer.
     
  15. nikkiXkev

    nikkiXkev PetForums Newbie

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    thanks we do freeze his kong and when he has a bone of kong he lies down and once its gone he starts acting himself i had him in living room for 3 and a half hours and he settled for 5 mins which was a serious milestone lol. he is now doing his business outside but if we leave him out of his crate in kitchen he jumps up on bences and bites the wall down to the meatal even though i leave him with his toys
     
  16. Rottiefan

    Rottiefan PetForums VIP

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    Dogs hump when they are over-aroused. It is a sexual behaviour, but it doesn't have to appear in sexual contexts. Punishing the pup for the humping specifically is inefficient because you are not doing anything about the underlying problem. When we have a cold, coughing just releases tension, it doesn't solve the underlying problem- we need medicine to do that and get to the the root of the problem.

    However, that is not to say humping is a problem. Many dogs, especially pups, hump during play when over-aroused. Even if they hump you, it isn't a problem, it just means that the dog is over-excited. Unfortunately, dog's don't possess the ability to self-reflect, and so when this behaviour is triggered punishing will do little, and will probably increase the pup's stress levels.

    Either redirecting the pup or training the pup to hump on command is the best option. If you train it like a trick, rewarding the dog when they do hump, then redirecting them into a sit, you'll gather more control. The dog may even begin to offer humping as a behaviour to be rewarded for, which you can put on command and control. :)
     
  17. TheFredChallenge

    TheFredChallenge PetForums Member

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    Train the pup to hump on command?!!! I find that a bit weird and could only see that being of great use if he was to have a career as a stud king doing his thaaaang!
     
  18. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Banned

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    It is a recognised method for dogs who bark incessantly or jump up. You train them to bark, then you can teach them to stop. Same with jumping up, you can train them to only jump up when invited. I have never heard it applied to humping before, and to be honest, I wouldn't bother unless it was becoming dangerous, like with my two.

    My little mongrel spent all of his 11 years happily humping his bean bag. He never did it to anything else, or anyone or any other dogs, so I didn't see a problem then and I don't now. It may not look very pleasant to human eyes, but it is natural for a dog and not hurting anybody.
     
  19. Sarah1983

    Sarah1983 PetForums VIP

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    The idea is that they learn that the behaviour is only rewarding when done on command so start to only do it on command. That way you can control the behaviour. Humping could certainly be turned into a trick, just like any other I suppose.
     
  20. TheFredChallenge

    TheFredChallenge PetForums Member

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    Yes I know, I understand all that - but just find the concept (and picture of) how you train them to hump on demand quite a bizarre scenario and scene in my head.

    In no way is that meant as having a go at your suggestion in what to do perhaps with the OP's dog. You are right, I have heard it before - but I'm just merely reflecting how I see that method.

    I tell my dog no or 'hey' (if the humping escalates) but never shout or stress him out over stopping it, he usually just goes on to do something else anyway after a few seconds.

    A calm 'No' or 'hey' has worked for me in being able to distract him and any humping is now brief/ minimal.....so I'm happy with that.

    I hope the OP finds a method that works for them soon.
     
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