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My dog isn’t sleeping through the night but is during the day. Am I doing this wrong?

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Dean-bordercollieowner, Jul 29, 2019.


  1. Dean-bordercollieowner

    Dean-bordercollieowner PetForums Newbie

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    I’ve recently got a border collie girl and whilst she isn’t having many problems she is struggling to sleep through the night.

    She will sleep through the day and I’ve read online not to wake them up. However she only sleeps during the day next to me. Either by my feet, next to me on the sofa or next to me on the bed. I’ve been wrapping her in her blanket so that she associates her blanket with sleeping and putting that in her bed at night but as soon as I leave her she starts to whine.

    If I move whilst she’s sleeping during the day she wakes up and starts to follow me. I’m worried that by allowing her to sleep near me during the day this is causing issues at night time.

    She doesn’t mind going in and out of her bed during the day but doesn’t sleep in it. She will, when given a new toy take the toy into her bed and play with it there. Her bed is in an open door crate with a blanket over to try and make it feel like a den, with a hot water bottle and a ticking clock. As soon as I lock the crate door she begins to whine and howl for hours on end. So I decided against this and left it open in the hallway by my bedroom but she still seems to howl. Online it seems to say not to put them in a crate but let them go of their own accord but I’m worried by allowing her to sleep next to me during the day I’m reinforcing some bad habits for the future. Anyone have any advice?
     
  2. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    Have you tried having the crate next to your bed at night? Not sure you need a hot water bottle in this weather unless you live in a very cold country? Normal house temp is fine for a dog.

    What i did with mine was to feed all their food in kongs in the crate (i got mine as 8 wk old pups so it was easy to feed the entire daily amount in kongs)

    At night time, i popped my pup into the closed crate with a stuffed kong, sheet over the top to indicate settle time and had the crate next to my bed. If there was whining, i said sssh, settle and left them to settle. I took them out into the garden during the night for toilet if they werent settling but kept it all low key, dim lights, no fuss and straight back to crate.

    I think @JoanneF has a good link of how to crate train - mine were fine with the crate door closed first night but you certainly want to go gently if your dog gets upset with the door closed.

    I had my pups in a pen when small during the daytime so they probably didnt get to follow me round when small - they do now though!!

    They settle well at night away from me but they like to be close to me all day and that works fine for me.
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  3. Dean-bordercollieowner

    Dean-bordercollieowner PetForums Newbie

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    No I haven’t tried putting it next to the bed. Might try that if she keeps howling. She normally cries for about three hours and then sleeps straight through until around 6 am.

    I did think the hot water bottle was a bit much in the summer heat. I’d just read online that can replicate the mother’s heat and since she’s spends most of the day slept by me my heat.

    I have tried treats in the crate but as soon as the door is locked she drops them and starts whining and biting at the bars and trying to push herself through them. I’m worried this will cause her to hurt herself.

    I live by myself and had read that puppies normally find a quiet spot by themselves to sleep in but as it’s just me. If she’s sleeping I’m normally quite quiet. I like the idea of a play pen to keep her from following me and might give me the opportunity to shower and cook a proper dinner without worrying about where she has gotten too. What kinds of things did you put into the pen?
     
  4. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    Unfortunately my link doesn't work - it's to the Facebook page of the Dog Training Advice and Support group, but it is only available if you actually join the group (which is well worth doing anyway).
     
    tabelmabel likes this.
  5. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    Mainly chew toys - you do need to train a pup to get going on a stuffed kong. Initially, their attention span is very short. So stuffed kongs, i think we had a puppy blanket in there and just chew toys.

    My youngest daughter used to sit with my older dog as a pup in the pen with her and stroke her to sleep sometimes - so it was always a nice relaxing place to be in the pen.
     
  6. katsanddogs

    katsanddogs PetForums Newbie

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    Our Vizsla pup was similar, he's 8 months old now but when we got him at 9 weeks he would follow me *everywhere* (they are known to be velcro dogs) and it made cooking, going to the loo etc - quite problematic! A play pen worked really well for him during the day, with some chew toys and so on, and quite quickly he learned to entertain himself.

    Night time has always been a challenge with him - he never got used to a crate and after a few weeks wouldn't sleep in the play pen. We tried every 'correct' way to sort this. We used to have a howling battle on our hands every night for hours. He now sleeps in the living room on a blanket on a sofa, which just tended to be where he'd drop off to sleep in the evening. I'd prefer him to be a bit more contained overnight but he's reliably house-trained and doesn't roam about at night. I guess my point there being don't beat yourself up if you end up with a less than 'perfect' night time sleeping situation, it is worse in my view to be exhausted and fed up!
     
    Amanda Mower likes this.
  7. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    If she’s crying for 3 hours she’s clearly unhappy alone so I would let her sleep close to you so she settles.

    In my experience this doesn’t create a dog that won’t settle alone but one that learns they are safe, secure and has company and can get into a good sleep routine.

    Gradually, they will get used to their new environment and naturally become more confident and independent then you can slowly move them to where you need them to sleep.

    A dog that is anxious, lonely and unhappy alone in the early days will either continue to be so (possibly getting worse) or just give in (probably exhausted :() - none of which are desirable.
     
  8. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Pups are very dependent on company, and would normally be sleeping with family members for some time. The first puppy I had (Kite) slept with me, on the bed - an older rescue dog slept there too. If she moved, I woke up and could quickly take her outside for a pee, so toilet training was achieved quickly. I had a litter from Kite, and those pups slept together downstairs, with a toilet break at around 3 am. Now, the pups are 5, the older dog has died and we all sleep together in the bedroom.

    Some people think that making pup sleep alone makes them independent, and that having them with you at night could lead to separation anxiety later on; in fact it's the opposite. Let the pup sleep with with or near you, and it will grow up feeling secure and will build a strong bond with you.
     
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