Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Mum attacking baby!

Discussion in 'Cat Breeding' started by Starlite, May 19, 2010.


  1. Starlite

    Starlite PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2009
    Messages:
    7,369
    Likes Received:
    229
    Squeak seems to be going for one of her kittens! :(

    I noticed it earlier this morning. I assumed she was trying to pick it up with ths scruff but heard it meowing really loud and when i checked she was biting the kittens back and legs

    I took the kitten out for 5 mins and put it back in and it was fine, but she's done it again!

    What do i do, please help me guys! :(
     
  2. munchkin

    munchkin PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0
    how old are the kittens, my cat misty done this when kittens were 4 weeks old and alot more active, might just be something they do, she still pins one down everynow and then to clean them and looks like she is biting their heads, kittens seem ok though, i was really worried as 1st time i had seen this.x
     
  3. Starlite

    Starlite PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2009
    Messages:
    7,369
    Likes Received:
    229
    theyre only 6 days old, im just a wee bit worried x
     
  4. jen24

    jen24 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    Messages:
    691
    Likes Received:
    8
    mother cats will attack their kittens if they feel there is something wrong with it, ie illness or deforminty ect. is the kitten healthy?

    its not reccommended to touch them too much at this age but i think you may need to try and help the mother bond with baby. you can try stroking the kittne in front of the mother softly and wait till the mother grooms/licks the baby and then stroke the mother so your sort of rewarding her for being nice and gentle.

    unfortuantly if this doesnt work you may have to seperate them. it may be an idea taking them all to your vets for a check up just to kake sure theres nothing wrong with baby or mum. plus he may then be able to advise you if what ive suggested doesnt work.:) x
     
  5. Milly22

    Milly22 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    3,317
    Likes Received:
    71
    Poppy was a little bit rough to start with too. I think once we quietened things down for her (ie upstairs beside my bed with blanket over crate) she seems to relax a little.

    As has been said, if mum sense some abnormality with the kitten she may also act like this.

    I try talking to her, I said " no, Poppy no, little babies, don't do that!" and she did come round and is more gentle with them now.

    Is she very young ?
     
  6. Tje

    Tje Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Messages:
    3,404
    Likes Received:
    203
    I find this kind of post very tough to advise on… what looks rough to one person make look quite acceptable to another.

    I have had mother cats who have been downright cruel to their kittens and I have separated them (absolute last resort) … I’ve had other mothers who just needed a bit of coaxing and an eye kept on the litter.

    Can I ask where the mother cat and the litter is in your home??? Like, are they locked in a spare bedroom, or does the mother cat have the run of the house? You might find the mother cat is feeling a bit agitated if she has too much space available to her. My fosters are almost always in a spare bedroom (they don’t have free run of the house, certainly not when the kittens are so small) and sometimes something as simple as closing the curtains completely calms a mother cat down. On rare occasions putting the mother cat in an even smaller space than a spare bedroom has helped. I now have a very large pen I can use… but I have used a downstairs toilet in the past, and a wardrobe, and a cupboard that stored the washing machine… and the mother cats actually improved vastly in their behavior when they had much less space available to them.

    Another thing I swear by with these wayward mothers is my webcam…. Without it I wouldn’t know what they are up to.

    It could be she is perfect with her kittens when you are not around, but plays up when you’re there. I’ve had this a few times, and without the webcam I wouldn’t have dared left certain mothers with their litters as they just looked too aggressive or too lazy (not feeding the kittens) or they trailed the kittens to really silly places for such small helpless animals. But as soon as I am out of the room , their beahviour actually improved (sometimes drastically!)

    I was also speaking with a very experienced foster mum recently, and she has had experience of mother cats who were extremely clingy towards her. By that I mean, if she (the foster mother) didn’t give the mother cat enough attention, or paid too much attention to the kittens, the mother cat would have a hissy fit and “attack” the kittens.

    Like I said in the beginning, I find these kind of posts terribly difficult to advise on… maybe if you could tell us a bit more about how it all goes and where in the home your nest is, we could collectively try to figure something out.

    All the best, I know how nerve wracking this kind of thing can be.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice