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Misbehaving dog - advice needed!!!

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by GLottie, Sep 16, 2013.


  1. GLottie

    GLottie PetForums Newbie

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    Hello, my pug cross 14months old. He was a cheeky puppy, chewing and a little bit destructive, then he almost grew out of this. But recently he has been burying his toys in the sofa more frequently and is being quite destructive.
    Today I came home from work to find a hole in my sofa. He was never this bad as a puppy and he wasn't left alone for too long - he is often left longer with no problems.

    Could this be an adolescent stage? He was castrated a month ago, and I'm aware he won't calm down immediately but his destructive behaviour has become worse. As a puppy he was kept in a crate whilst we were out, I'm not keen on locking him away again now he is used to having the lounge to himself but I'm not sure I have any other options.

    Any advice is welcome! Thank you
     
  2. Kivasmum

    Kivasmum PetForums VIP

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    Dogs do go through a teenage phase and sometimes turn into little monsters :D does he get excersized before you leave him? He could just be bored or getting rid of excess energy? And I don't think neutering is a fail safe way of calming them down, the only thing it guarantees is no puppies ha ha
     
  3. GLottie

    GLottie PetForums Newbie

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    I always make sure I walk him before I leave, because he doesn't have access to outside in the day. I am hoping its a naughty phase and he will grow out of it!
     
  4. Kivasmum

    Kivasmum PetForums VIP

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    They do push their luck a bit, but it may be worth crating him again until he grows out of it? Wouldn't want it becoming his usual behaviour. I know I thought kiva had "grown up" and could be trusted out of her crate, she was fine for a few weeks then went back to chewing up random stuff while I was out, so back in her crate she went! She is being trusted left out now and has been for about 3 months with no incidents.......and she was 2 in June :D you could leave him with a stuffed kong or something to occupy him?
     
  5. Riff Raff

    Riff Raff PetForums Senior

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    Sofas are very tempting to chew, and once they start, they almost always do it again. Dogs do become more energetic during their teenage stage, need more exercise, more mental stimulation and less sleep than young pups.

    I would suggest giving him access to another area of the house but shutting the door to the lounge. He needs to have supervised access only to the sofa until he understands not to chew it. Leave him with a frozen kong to keep him occupied for a while when you leave. I am not sure how much or what type of exercise he is getting, but it might be time to consider increasing or changing it.
     
  6. leashedForLife

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    As he's already crate-trained, i'd go back to crating, but i'd add a stuffed & frozen Kong, a safe solid-rubber
    or solid-nylon chew-toy, or other dog-safe "pacifiers" & busywork.

    After a few weeks of daytime / worktime crating, i'd try him in a DOG-PROOF area for an hour or so -
    see how that goes, but i wouldn't leave him with access to the lounge until he's proven himself with
    less-easily-ruined items.

    Closed doors, baby-gates, tethers, etc, can be really helpful.
    .
    .
     
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