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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
Emee is a KC registered tri-colour, CKCS and is totally adorable. Her parents have all relevant health test papers etc so I know she is a good puppy for her breed (as much as you can with CKCS).
My main question with her is wether to breed from her or not? obviously at a MUCH MUCH later date.
I want to try to gather as much un-biased info as possible and the pro's and con's also.
I would like to breed her as I know the breed is in much need of 'good' genes and a wider bloodline then it already has. Also, I know of several people who, further down the line, have already expressed interest IF she were to be allowed to breed. So homes, really are not too much of a worry for me.
Plus I have room, so keeping them is a viable option also, if homes fall through. If I do decide to go ahead, I will use a fully health tested KC reg male also. (opps forgot to say I would get Emee tested before breeding also!).
I want to try to get a clear picture of it all as if I decide not to go ahead, I want her to be spayed ASAP when the vet gives me the go-ahead with regards to her age.
At the moment I am undecided, but as I say the only real urgency is if I decide NOT to I want her spayed before her first season.
Thanks in advance
Louise:)
 

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Firstly without sounding partonizing I applaud you for doing your research... so many don't.

With CKCS they can't be bred until 2.5yrs minimum, which is much later than most toys as they cannot have their MRI until this age. I assume both parents were MRI'd when you say they had the relevant health tests and they were both at least 2.5yrs before breeding.

You need to determine how good she is, how close she is to the breed standard. With a breed as popular as CKCS she really should be shown to prove just how good she is. Pet bred CKCS are far too big compared to the show standard. They should be very petit not the huge ones you see in pet homes.

The pros of breeding- TBH there aren't many.
* breeding your own shock stock and taking pride in the successes of your stock.
*IF it goes well it can be satisfying to know you have brought a new life into the world.

The cons of breeding- Loads
*It is very expensive, especially health testing for a CKCS
*It is heartbreaking... on average 1.5 puppies die per litter.
*It is very time consuming. You need to be able to get 8 weeks off work minimum (if things go to plan)
*The risk of losing your bitch is quite high.
*You should have at least £2000 put aside which you can get to at a moments notice, many vets won't perform c section without payment up front.
*You may be stuck with all the puppies. People drop out of puppy buying at the last minute on a regular basis.

There are loads more that I'm sure people will add to
 

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I would also talk to the breeder you bought her from, they may tell you she has good potential therefore you would want to wait on the sapying until all the tests have been done, on the other hand they may be able to tell you that they know she is not quite the caliber they would breed from. They sound like responsible breeders so asking them questions could be very valuable. My Collie turned 2 in Oct and I just took her to a breeder for evaluation now we have the tests to get through before the final decision is made. Please keep us posted and your little girl and piccies would be loved...Jill
 

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At the moment I am undecided, but as I say the only real urgency is if I decide NOT to I want her spayed before her first season.
As Tanya says, well done for doing your research.

Why do you have to make a decision so urgently though? and why the determination to get her neutered before her first season. IMO - bitches should be allowed to reach maturity before neutering (i.e. have at least one season) - and as this can happen at 5 months or even 18 months or later, this is a massive difference in determining whether a bitch is fully mature or not.

You are going to be at least 3 or 4 seasons in before you can mate her anyway -so why not wait and keep your options open - her health tests may not be within the recommended levels for the breed, at which point you wouldn't be mating her anyway and would probably be wise to neuter her.

Personally, I would never neuter before a first season unless there was a very good reason for it - and those reasons would probably tie in with being good reasons why a bitch shouldn't be bred from in the first place
 

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Shouldn't this op's 2 identical threads be merged?
 

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As Tanya said, your bitch has to be a minimum of 2.5years, the parents should be over 5, as they shouldn't've been mated until the bitch and sire were over 2.5yrs.

Make sure you go for a proven stud, we may be going back to our Holly's breeder, as she has recently aquired 2 studs, unrelated to her, however we also have contacted a couple of kennels with good show lines.

How old is your bitch? Ours is only 7 months, however we are starting to show. I'm guessing you're wanting to decide now to be able to save the money, however we are saving money, but waiting until Holly is 2 before we decide whether to mate her or not, as she will need an MRI at 2.5yrs.

We are in the process of eye testing and heart testing her now, and will be doing so every 6 months, so at 12, 18 and 24 months. We are also taking her back to her breeder for an evaluation the beginning of June.

If I were you, I'd get her eye and heart tested, see the results, then if they aren't up to scratch spay her after her first season. Which is what we will be doing if Holly's results aren't good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi
Thanks for the info!
My vet was the one who said about getting her spayed before her first season and he mentioned about 6-8mths old (maybe I'm wrong though??) It was when I took her to be micro-chipped so was more concerned with her as she was crying such alot!!
He then went on to highlight all medical conditions he said could be contributed to bitches going into seasons??? Not sure how right he was on that though,as I have read spaying to young can create problems like incontinance etc..
My other post was a little highjacked, so think I will answer this one first.
There isn't a rush, but I just like to read up about everything and know what I MAY be letting Emee and myself in for either way. I am terrible for that sort of thing, I was reading pregnancy and childbirth books 12yrs before I actually had my first son. Sorry if this thread and questions make it sound like I am rushing things!
Were can I take Emee too, within the West midlands for her eyes and ear tests? Does anyone know off hand, or would I find out if I googled for it?
Sorry if anyone takes offense to this thread, I have read others about breeding which makes me uneasy now as to wether to bother or not anyway! Luckily I have a few months anyway, before deciding on anything.
If Emee has her first season, I have to wait 3mths after she has finished it before spayying anyway, thats the info I have gathered. Is that right???
Thanks
Louise
 
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