Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Maine Coons??

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by kateaitken07, Jul 24, 2009.


  1. kateaitken07

    kateaitken07 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    0
    I really want to get a Maine Coon as I adore the breed.

    I will wait for a year until my babies are bigger but I like to plan ahead!

    Can Maine Coons live with Moggies for are they best suited as a single house cat?
     
  2. ellie8024

    ellie8024 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 4, 2009
    Messages:
    1,128
    Likes Received:
    18
    if you get it from a kitten it should be ok in a multi cat household
     
  3. ClaireLily

    ClaireLily PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2008
    Messages:
    875
    Likes Received:
    53
    Please don't take this badly, but wasn't it just yesterday you wanted to breed your half Siamese? Please do not rush into anything, make sure you give yourself plenty time to think before investing in studs or more cats of any breed.

    Over the past few months I have wanted another kitten, lost a cat, gotten a new kitten, wanted another new kitten, wanted a puppy (only lasted a day), gone back to wanting a new kitten, thinking it was best not to get a new kitten and am now after months of debate going to get another new kitten. This descision has been made having had now 3 kittens from 10 weeks of age so I fully know what to expect. And am 100% certain that I want to be owned by yet another fur baby.

    I just hope you don't jump into anything too quickly then regret whatever descision you might make. Planning for the future is great just remember to cover all angles.
     
  4. kateaitken07

    kateaitken07 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yes I did want to breed my girl but after the comments on here I changed my mind.

    Its not a definate, but I would rather plan ahead and know the full details of everything BEFORE I go and get one.

    Surely thats just being responsable?!
     
  5. ClaireLily

    ClaireLily PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2008
    Messages:
    875
    Likes Received:
    53
    Of course it is! Your doing exactly the right thing, I just thought from breeding your own siamese to aquiring a maine coon was a pretty far leap and wanted to urge you not to rush into anything on a whim, using my recent whims as an example to show I wasn't having a go just being cautious.
     
  6. Miss.PuddyCat

    Miss.PuddyCat PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    3,917
    Likes Received:
    43
    I had a maine coon and he was a gentlemen and a big throw ug on the floor. He was fine with other cats and took to sleeping most of the day. But he was terriefied of everything!! I would love to get another in the future :)

    His name was Moe, he sadly past away two years ago
     

    Attached Files:

  7. messyhearts

    messyhearts PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    Messages:
    2,632
    Likes Received:
    55
    I adore my Maine Coon. She's coming to grips with our new kitten at the moment - can't decide if she wants to mother or play with him!!!

    I do adore them but they are, as someone else said to me once, like bulls in china shops. They do not know their size & they HURT when they are coming to terms with it. They are not lap cats either. They are affectionate but in their own way once they have finished playing. ;)
     
  8. Marcel

    Marcel PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    May 25, 2009
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    4
    Sorry but I have to say yes they are lap cats,I have one curled up on my lap right now.
     
  9. Janee

    Janee PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,309
    Likes Received:
    27
    each cat is different. MCs are a bit dog-like. They tend to 'take' to one person
     
  10. messyhearts

    messyhearts PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    Messages:
    2,632
    Likes Received:
    55
    My MC curls up on my lap too but she isn't a lap cat as it is not a common occurrence (as I said, she's too busy playing). Now my Birman is a lap cat.

    I agree that they are dog-like.
     
  11. kateaitken07

    kateaitken07 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just HOW big do Maine Coons get? I adore huge big cats (My Ronnie is a big girl).

    And I swear all my fur babies think there dogs... the way the act you would think so too :lol:
     
  12. ClaireLily

    ClaireLily PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2008
    Messages:
    875
    Likes Received:
    53
    Excuse me if I'm being a bit dim but after this the last thing I expected to read was 'How big do they get'?

    I would have presumed that given you were after getting one and you adored the breed so much you might have known this? I'm sorry if I get anyones back up but do you have the same lack of knowledge in Siamese/half Siamese/breeding/anything else you might think you fancy?

    Responsibility should be a requirement for anyone to have the honor to look after an animal!

    For info they are one of the biggest breed of domestic feline alongside the beautiful Norwegian Forest cats, I think a max of 11 kg males and 6 kg female.
     
  13. Kipp

    Kipp PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    My MC boy is only 14 months and is 6kg with his step sister at 5.5kg. Big kittens with three + years to grow.

    Lap cats when they want to be and are like dogs, Tilly has decided that 'fetch' is a great sport and will chase, catch and return.

    - Method; take an empty crisp packet, fold lengthways in half twice then tie a knot in each end, (to look like a bone and big enough not to cause choking), then throw and shout fetch and as if by magic, it's back by your feet, (even if you've moved!)

    Kipp
     
  14. kateaitken07

    kateaitken07 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know they get big as they are one of the largest domestic animals, I just didnt know an approx weight FGS.

    Look, I really am very sorry for trying to get advice on things. Maybe I'll just do stuff without thinking instead as it seems Im not allowed to ask advice in order to make informed choices.

    Thanks you for making me feel like ****, I think I shall find somewhere else for advice.
     
  15. Baby Bordie

    Baby Bordie PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2009
    Messages:
    5,146
    Likes Received:
    160
    Everyone is just making sure you are making the right choice, So we, as animal lovers, need to make sure that you know what you are doing! Were just being cautious! :D
     
  16. sequeena

    sequeena PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Messages:
    21,583
    Likes Received:
    578
    Maine coons are wonderful!

    I'm getting a beautiful snowy rosetta blue eyed bengal next summer, I can't wait!
     
  17. kateaitken07

    kateaitken07 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    0
    I disagree, it would seem that unless you have a cat with papers then your not welcome to do anything.

    I feel that if I ask anything that might be slightly wrong, I get jumped on.

    Yes I adore the Maine Coon breed, but people GAIN knowledge, Im sure you lot had to ask or read about cat characteristics at some point.

    So, I shall leave you lot to jump on someone else for trying to make informed choices.
     
  18. messyhearts

    messyhearts PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    Messages:
    2,632
    Likes Received:
    55
    Please don't tar everyone with the same brush. If you have any questions about MCs feel free to PM me.

    For what it is worth, my MC at six months was 4kg & she's massive with over two years growth to go.
     
    #18 messyhearts, Jul 25, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2009
  19. Baby Bordie

    Baby Bordie PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2009
    Messages:
    5,146
    Likes Received:
    160
    You can ask questions... Its a free forum, but atleast your trying to find these things out, you could be a person who just jumps in and gets one with no knowledge!

    Heres some Imfo! :D




    The Maine Coon Cat is one of the oldest naturally developed pedigree cat breeds in North America. The name Maine Coon came about because it is generally assumed that it originated in the state of Maine (it has actually been given the title of the official cat of the State of Maine). The Coon part can be attributed to many myths, but the most common, although genetically impossible, is that the ringed tail on the tabby varieties was the result of matings between domestic cat and racoons! However, originally only the brown tabby Maine Coons were called Maine.





    Myths and Reality:
    Another of the colourful myths was the romantic tale of Captain Samuel Clough of Wiscasset, Maine and Marie Antoinette, Queen of France and her royal cats. At the time of the Revolution there were plans to ship the Queen and some of her household belongings from France to America.


    Captain Clough was hired to transport the Queen's possessions over to America. In addition to her china, silver and furniture were loaded six of the Queen's longhaired cats. Upon arrival in America the goods were put in to store but it soon became apparent that the Queen would not be leaving France so, in the absence of anyone likely to claim the furniture, it was distributed amongst Captain Clough's relatives. The cats were then set free and proceeded to do what came naturally to them, their offspring are said today to be the royal ancestor's of the Maine Coon. The third myth was concerning a much more ordinary English sea Captain, Captain Coon! Captain Coon operated in trading ship in the early days of the colonies, he was, like many sailors, extremely fond of cats. He traded all along the New England coast and obviously when stepping a shore to trade, his feline friends took the opportunity of taking a little shore-leave of their own!



    These cats were the early longhaired Persians and Angoras which were at the time very popular in England. Quiteunderstandably his cats mated with the local population and some longhaired kittens began to appear which the locals named Coons cats. As they were so unusual (there were no native longhaired cats in America before this time. In fact, the only domestic cats in the USA arrived with early European settlers), they were extremely highly prized and people began to deliberately mate one with another and this is how the Maine Coon was supposed to have started! In reality the Maine Coon appears to have developed to cope with the harsh climate. But, as explained before, the longhaired gene from the cats of European settlers must also have played its part.The coat is glossy, heavy and water resistant with a marked differences between the winter and summer coats. They have a full ruff, longer in the males, and the hair is also longer on the stomach, they also have a rather splendid pair of britches! This long hair, it is believed, is there to protect against the snow. The shoulders, head and back are shorter so that it does not snag when walking through the bushes. However, the coat is fairly maintenance free, with the exception of the winter moult when the coat sheds. The Maine Coons other protective qualities are the huge plumy tail which can be used to wrap around his body against the winter cold. His ears also more heavily furred and his big round feet act as a kind of snowshoe, especially as the paw tufts extend backwards to flick off the soft snow preventing it collecting between the pads, which frost-bite. It also believed that the large ears and eyes have evolved for increased awareness

    Size:The size of the Maine Coon has been much exaggerated with stories of over 30 or 40 pound cats! In reality they are indeed very large, tall, heavy boned, muscular cats, but perhaps with the addition of the heavy coat has led to people perceiving them as much larger than they actually are. Like most stories, they tend to become more colourful and exaggerated the more times they are told! Males are much larger than the Females reaching a weight when fully grown of between 13 and 18 pounds (6-8kgs) and the Females between 9 and 12 pounds (4-5.5kgs). Maine Coons develop very slowly, achieving their full size in three to four years.

    DISPOSITION:Their disposition is second to none, they remain playful for all of their lives and are commonly called the gentle giant of the cat world. As they have a very laid back attitude towards other cats, preferring to be friendly rather than aggressive'. They also have a very endearing quality of chirping, a rather delightful and gentle noise considering their size! Another rather strange quality is their affinity to water, they can often be seen playing with their paws in the sink, bath, shower, they often like to come and sit on the edge of the bath and seem fascinated with the movement of the water. When they drink from their water bowls, they scrap the surface of the water for imaginary leaves, this is presumably an inherited quality from the time when they drank from pools.

    BODY AND SHAPE:The most important features of the Maine Coon are the head, body shape and texture quality of the coat. The headis slightly longer than it is wide, with a gently concave profile and high cheekbones with a definite square muzzle. The ears are large, wide at the base but moderately pointed, well furnished with hair and set high on the head about an ear's width apart. Lynx tips extending from the top of the ears are most desired! The neck should be of medium size and the body long with a broad chest, the tail must be at least as long as the body, reaching to the shoulders.

    VARIETY OF COLOURS:There is a huge Varity of colours available in the Maine Coon in both tabby and solid patterns but not the Siamese- type pointing. There is no restriction on he eye colour with the exception of the solid white which may also have blue or odd eye colour ( one blue eye and one gold) which is not permitted in the other colours.

    THE PERFECT PET: Finally, the Maine Coon is considered by many people as the most perfect of domestic pets with their clown like personalities, affectionate natures, insatiable curiosity and their easy-maintenance coats. They do make wonderful companions, have no objections to dogs and other animals and can easily get used to walking on a harness. A Maine Coon will not ignore you, preferring all the time to know exactly where you are and just hate being left alone with no companionship. Once you have owned a Maine Coon, to buy any other breed would just be like a compromise!
     
  20. Angeli

    Angeli PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2008
    Messages:
    910
    Likes Received:
    19
    What is your reason for choosing the Maine Coon breed?

    Do you have the space to keep a Maine Coon cat along with your other six cats? - on your website it states that space is limited. Ideally you will also need a large cat proof garden or have a secure cat pen built. You cant let a pedigree cat free roam as they are targetted by thieves.

    You also have two very young children - are you sure the Maine Coon temperament will be suitable with very young children, being large they can be quite clumsy and boisterous (I think someone has already mentioned that).
    How would you react if your children keep getting accidentally injured?

    - And I was just wondering how are you going to answer the probing questions that any responsible breeder will be asking? - their main concern will be that their kitten ends up in a permanent loving home and not moved on when your circumstances change - or you've overstretched your limit. Two small children and six cats are more than enough for anybody to cope with, I presume you have already discussed all the merits of being a multi-cat household with your husband.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice