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Long haired cat grooming

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Just787, Aug 5, 2021.


  1. Just787

    Just787 PetForums Junior

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    Hi
    So I’ve discovered my long haired Norwegian forest cat has tats around his bum and hind legs.
    He got neutered and has put on weight since then- about 1kg (so I’ve put him on a diet) but noticed the other day him struggling to reach to clean his bits!
    anyway I was giving him a good brush and he let me brush around his back legs which he never lets me get anywhere near and realised big clumps of tatty fur. what do i do?
    I’ve read up on tangle teezers being better for brushing out shedding hair but the tats are going to have to be clippered I think. It’s going to be a mare getting him to sit for that?
     
  2. Maurey

    Maurey Maine Coon Madness

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    As long as the mats aren’t super close to the skin, a dog deshedder like this works wonders. The tines are sharp and designed to pullout undercoat without touching the topcoat, so it’s great for getting at matting.

    upload_2021-8-5_23-56-24.jpeg
    For something less drastic, though, you could make use of a seam ripper :>
     
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  3. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Pull the mats apart with your fingers. A tool like the above will only hurt him and may make things worse. And you don't want a tool that cuts the coat for regular grooming. If they can't be pulled apart by hand, you'll have to have the spots shaved and just keep him groomed daily to prevent more forming.

    Keep him on a good quality wet only diet. This will help with keeping him at a healthy weight, and help keep his coat at it's best. I would recommend you add an omega 3 supplement as well. Krill oil, or green lipped mussel are my preferences, some people like to use salmon oil.

    To pull the mat apart, just get your fingers on it and gently start pulling. As you gain skill and experience in doing this you will begin to understand how mats form, and how to keep them controlled. You can feel a thickening of the fur even before it becomes mats. Often you might notice dandruff in the thicken spots or the matted spots.
     
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  4. Bertie'sMum

    Bertie'sMum Obedient Cat Slave

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    A little unscented talcum powder on your fingers will help you to pull the mats apart.
     
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  5. Maurey

    Maurey Maine Coon Madness

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    Untrue, don’t confuse a bladed dog dematter and a furminator. A properly made dog dematter is painless, as it’s sharp only on the inner part, with very soft/rounded tips (in fact, it’s the only brush my younger cat likes, unfortunately for me), and nowhere did I suggest it for regular use, just for removing matted or tangled fur. Bladed brushes are the perfect use case for tatty trousers. There is absolutely no reason to upset a cat by detangling numerous mats in an area many longhairs don’t like to be brushed, in the first place. No reason to use clippers on a cat that’s not used to them and may get terrified over, either, unless the mats are very numerous and close to the skin. At that point you’d want a professional, though, as the cat is very liable to wiggle around and get itself hurt.
     
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  6. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    We'll just have to agree to disagree then. I would never use something like that on a cat, mats or not. :)
     
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  7. Just787

    Just787 PetForums Junior

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    Thankyou all for your advice
    What exactly does the dematter or furminator do?
    I think the tats just need to be cut off completely
    my cat doesn’t like the sound of the clipper though and as the tats are knotted in the creases in his hind legs they’re in a tricky position.
    Should I be taking him to a groomer? I can’t imagine him letting anyone go near him!
    The less stressed for all the better
     
  8. Maurey

    Maurey Maine Coon Madness

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    Furminators are a total no-no for the vast majority of cats. Dematters in the style I showed a photo of just help cut out mats if they’re not too close to the skin. If the matting is particularly bad, or does lie close to the skin, it may be the least stressful to get his britches professionally done, though.
     
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  9. Pinkdon

    Pinkdon PetForums Junior

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    I had the same issue with my long haired cat but he hated any brushing. I booked him in at the local groomer but COVID hit. I had already tried the furminator and a trixie de-matt comb with no joy. In the end I picked up a really quiet electric pet grooming shaver for about £6 delivered and caught him one matt at a time when he was relaxing and I was just stroking him. I only shaved the matted bits and his hair soon came back with no obvious signs. If I remember right he had about 5 at the rear, the first time took him by surprise as they are quiet, but I think he got used to it! Now he’ll allow me to brush him - only with the tiny trixie brush. I’m glad I tried as I think the stress of a groomer would have been worse for him. A couple of times I only got part of the matt but it was enough and I tried again the next day. Only used them that time but I still keep them handy, you never know!
     
  10. lillytheunicorn

    lillytheunicorn PetForums VIP

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    Please do not use a furminator on a Norwegian, you will strip the hair out too much.

    how old is he? The first proper adult moult which my a couple of my youngsters are experiencing now age just 2 years tends to get caught in the adult coat as the previous coat is softer. Which causes more matts. As they get older the coat matures and matts less when moulting.

    If he has a lot of matts in his knickerbocker and groin, it may be easier to get a cat groomer to clip them out. If you don’t have a cat groomed then your vet nurses could do it for you.

    I really like the pet teezer brushes for the Norwegians, it gets through their double coat really effectively. Our cats tolerate it much better than our comb.

    Slicker brushes make them look pretty but doesn’t get matts out. A wide tooth comb is helpful to get mats out.
     
  11. Just787

    Just787 PetForums Junior

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    I think I’ll get one of those clippers, I’ve seen them online. I’ve got my husbands small beard trimmer thing but I don’t think he’d appreciate it being used on the cats bits
    and it’s too noisy
     
  12. Just787

    Just787 PetForums Junior

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    The teezer brushes like the tangle teezers for us humans …?
    I’ll try one as they’re pretty good too
    Thankyou for your help
     
  13. SbanR

    SbanR PetForums VIP

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    :Hilarious
     
  14. lillytheunicorn

    lillytheunicorn PetForums VIP

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    Yep made by the same company https://www.petteezer.com/de-shedding.html it’s the de shedding brush you want.

    You may still need to cut out some matts if they are firm stuck rather than clumped. I would do them one at a time and give him a treat afterwards then let him have a break. It takes me a few days to get the matts out if they get them. That way they don’t get too stressed about it all.
     
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  15. Just787

    Just787 PetForums Junior

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    Thankyou
    Well Ive ordered a petteezer and in the meantime managed to get one of his armpit tats done
    He was lying basking in the sun so was pretty chilled and he let me tease it a little so I got my tiny nail scissors and gently snipped away and got the majority of it out. I was worried in case he jumped up but he was fine.
    Then he got bored so I’ll have to pounce on him another day to get the other side.
    I think I’ll need my son to help with his hind leg bits though. My son is like the cat whisperer he’s great.
    Will definitely keep on top of his grooming a bit more now though and get one of those tools to help with maintenance. He’s 4 now and never really had a problem before so think it may be something to do with him shedding extra fur over this hot summer maybe ….? And his adult fur as mentioned above.
     
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