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Letting Kitten out for the first time... advice please x

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Chaddycat, Sep 14, 2020 at 2:16 PM.


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  1. Chaddycat

    Chaddycat PetForums Member

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    Obviously I will wait until she has had her jabs and been neutered. But any advice would be great.
     
  2. Babyshoes

    Babyshoes PetForums Senior

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    The best advice I can give is to wait until she's at least a year old before you let her out on her own.

    In the meantime you can start harness training so she can go out with you safely after she's had her jabs, microchip and spey. Kittens are pretty reckless and have no sense of danger in their first year, a bit like human teenagers!

    That said, some people believe that cats shouldn't free roam at all, which I do understand because of the potential dangers, though I personally think the enjoyment mine get balances the risks - though we're not very close to any main roads so the risks are somewhat lower for them. I do keep them in overnight with a microchip cat flap on curfew mode.

    If you're not sure about letting her free roam in your area, look at cat proofing your garden or a catio, or just keeping her as an indoor cat.
     
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  3. Chaddycat

    Chaddycat PetForums Member

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    Each to there own but I think its nice to be able to have the freedom. I can understand why people choose to have indoor cats though. My adult cat goes out but hes a homely chap and doesn't go far, and is back within a few minutes. I would want them in in the evenings x
     
  4. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    I wouldn't. There are so any dangers out there, and I wouldn't do the harness training either. I think only being allowed out on a harness could be very frustrating.

    Instead I'd be looking into creating a catio, or proofing my garden.
     
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  5. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    The only advice I can give is .....Don't .
    It isn't safe and they gain very little from living on their nerves ,any pleasure is negated by the dangers.
     
  6. ebonycat

    ebonycat PetForums VIP

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    I agree with @OrientalSlave & @buffie and don’t.
    It’s just not safe anymore, there’s too much danger out there for cats now, especially kittens.
    Cat-proof your garden or build a catio.
    If you must let her out then please do what @Babyshoes says, wait till she’s at least a year old.
     
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  7. Chaddycat

    Chaddycat PetForums Member

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    Its personal preference I guess. But I prefer a cat to have the freedom they desire x
     
  8. Chaddycat

    Chaddycat PetForums Member

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    I will wait until she is older. I say she... the vet confirmed she is a he today ;)
     
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  9. Hammystar

    Hammystar PetForums Junior

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    How old is he at the moment?

    My advice is to do it slowly whenever he seems ready and is showing an interest in being outside.

    Jinxy has been going out whenever he wants since I had the cat flap installed. He must have been about six months at the time. Prior to that he was going out with my supervision. He has always adored being outside and gets very frustrated at being kept in. I got him at the beginning of summer last year so was able to be outside in the garden with him quite a lot. I know his breeder had been letting him out on their garden at just 7 or 8 weeks old which I don't agree with but it gave him a real taste for the outside. I live in a cul-de-sac next to a stream and fields. He loves going hunting and brings me no end of voles. I do worry, but at the end of the day it's his happiness that is important. Since the weather has been warm again this week I've barely seen him except when he's come in for food.

    I'm not sure what I will do with Ziggy especially as we are heading to Autumn and winter. He can't use the cat flap until he is microchipped anyway so that won't be until he is neutered (hopefully at 4 months if he is heavy enough)
     
  10. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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  11. Hammystar

    Hammystar PetForums Junior

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    No, they are field voles. I checked and identified them early on. There are lots of other predators who hunt mice and voles in our area, I frequently hear owls hooting at night.

    I do understand the idea of cat proofed gardens but it just wouldn't be possible where I am. I also have slow worms in my garden which are a protected species. Cat proofing wouldn't help them. It's a balancing act between encouraging wildlife and protecting it.
     
  12. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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    @Hammystar
    A big distinction is that owls need to hunt to eat but pet cats are fed.
    Domestic cats are natural predators but many places they live today are not their natural habitat, including the UK. It is thought domestic cats bring home only a small portion of their kills.
    If you cannot cat proof your garden and do not do so already, keeping cats in at dawn and dusk would help the native wildlife.
     
  13. Charity

    Charity Endangered Species

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    I always say think of kittens as children, you wouldn't allow a four year old child out on its own wandering the streets and it's the same with kittens. They are neither big enough nor savvy enough until almost a year old to cope with all the dangers out in the big wide world. Better be cautious and patient for a few months rather than risk losing them.
     
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  14. gskinner123

    gskinner123 PetForums VIP

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    What I have always found very strange is that it is seen as perfectly normal to open the door and let the cat out, but we don't do this with the dog.

    A number of people have given me all kinds of reasons as to why this is so, but none make sense to me, personally.
     
  15. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    While I agree with you that it's odd that we're more protective of one pet than the other, I do open the door and let my dogs out. But I've worked very hard with my dogs to make sure they come when called, don't wander, and are always where I can see them.
    I've done the same with the cats - which is strange apparently :D
     
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  16. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    If they've never been out they have no desire for "freedom". And a cat proofed garden can give the same freedom anyway. Well you know the risks. We see threads about it all the time here. I don't read those threads as I have little sympathy for people whose cats are killed or maimed on the road or by predators.

    At least wait until he's an adult cat - over one year old.
     
  17. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Well comparing cats and dogs in terms of free roaming vs being protective - cats are prey as well as predator. And far more likely to be hit by a car, poisoned deliberately, abused by mean people, unknowingly shut into someone's shed and left to starve to death....the list goes on
     
  18. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    If this is true, and I could pedantically argue that it's not entirely true, it makes it even more odd that we choose to let cats roam and not dogs. If cats are even more susceptible to bad things happening to them than dogs are, why on earth let cats roam when we don't even allow it of our dogs?

    I have a dog now who is smaller than both my cats (granted they are both big cats), and I won't even let her out at dark/dusk off a leash because I worry about predators. The cats can at least climb to safety, the dog can't.
     
  19. Chaddycat

    Chaddycat PetForums Member

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    this wasn't a thread about the rights and wrongs of indoors versus outdoors. I think that is something people will never agree on. Chadwick was an indoor cat in his old home and is still a homely cat. Only going our foe a couple of minutes at a time. I imagine Rue will be different as she is always longingly looking out the window and trying to sneak out when I open the door. I will wait until she's a bit older x
     
  20. urbantigers

    urbantigers PetForums VIP

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    I would wait until spring now if possible. Longer days. Dusk isn’t a great time for a cat to be outside.
     
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