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Letting an indoor cat out with supervision - PROBLEMS

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by LittlePancakeTheExotic, Sep 3, 2013.


  1. LittlePancakeTheExotic

    LittlePancakeTheExotic http://jogmydog.co.uk/

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    Hi Guys

    So I've been back and forth in my mind re letting Pankee out in our garden (under constant supervision). We have a 6ft fence and a lot of space so I thought why not over the weekend (this is the second time as I stopped it after a few days three weeks back as he meow'd constantly when not out there).

    Well it seems to have started again! I take him out before work for 45min-1hr so he can run about, watch birds, etc. In total I'm with him for 2hrs in the morning before work. I do the same thing again in the evening but for nearly 1.5hrs. HOWEVER, over the weekend and yesterday he did a lot (and I mean a lot as he's a mute cat normally) of meowing by the back door and looking real unhappy. Today he refused to move from the toilet area, just staring at the back door and subsequently first pee'd on the bath mat (before going out) and then again on my boyfriends trousers after coming back in an hour later.

    So what do you guys think, is this all a bad idea?? I read on here people letting their cats out on harnesses, etc but this is pretty much the same idea. How is it working for others? Is the peeing perhaps a behaviour thing or just that he can't hold it (refusing to move from the area is my guess). It's only been three days again so if it's best I stop it I will do (he's not ever going to be a roaming cat).

    Thanks in advance. It's stressing me out, not knowing what is 'fairer' or 'nicer' for him. :bored:
     
  2. vivien

    vivien PetForums VIP

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    Could you perhaps build him a run or cat cat proof your garden and put a cat flap in? My cats have free run of the garden as I only have a tiny garden we have cat proofed there is a very good sticky on here about it. Also is your cat neutered? As he will want to go out and find the lady cats.

    Viv xx
     
  3. LittlePancakeTheExotic

    LittlePancakeTheExotic http://jogmydog.co.uk/

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    Thanks for the quick reply. :)

    He hasn't been "done" yet as the breeder said he would develop more fully if I left him as late as possible (9mths or so was the suggestion). He would look more like a tom cat if I understood correctly. I was just going to play this by year as I'd like him to develop fully as she suggested but not if it causes other problems.

    We can't ever let him out in the garden unsupervised as he's trying to attack our hens at every spare minute (these are my original "babies" so don't want them to come to harm).

    A little run may be a possibility but unsure how to work it as the house is listed so we're really restricted on what we can do with the outside of the house (front and back as both visible to the public). Therein lies the problem I suppose!

    I'm half thinking I should stop now and maybe let him out next summer when he's a year old. I've only had him just over a month and we've been out / in; out / in twice now - maybe it's all just too confusing?!
     
  4. LDK1

    LDK1 PetForums VIP

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    The first thing I would do is stop taking him out whilst I figure out how deal with situation long-term. I know it's hard to listen to the meowing, but as you've only taken him out a couple of times so far, he should get used to not going out again after a short while.

    I've just seen that he's not been 'done' yet. He should definitely not be let out then anyway as the urge to want to establish a bigger territory could be stronger.

    Was he weeing or spraying? It may be stress-related, but if he doesn't get back to normal within a couple of days maybe ring your vet for advice in case he's developed a UTI.

    I have a cat run and, like some other on here, it's completely free-standing so it wouldn't do any damage to a listed building. It could be made to look nice with hanging baskets and pot plants around the outside so that it's not an eyesore. :)
     
  5. spotty cats

    spotty cats PetForums VIP

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    No reason not to neuter him now, he won't develop jowels at 9 months anyway all your doing is risking ingrained stud behaviors such as spraying.
    Early altered cats actually grow bigger, taller and larger than those done later.

    My cats all go out on harness, they understand harness = outside, no harness = inside and don't bother meowing or carrying on at other times.
     
  6. LittlePancakeTheExotic

    LittlePancakeTheExotic http://jogmydog.co.uk/

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    LDK1 - I'm not sure if it was spraying or weeing (how would I tell the difference?) - I didn't see him do it either time, just saw/smelled it, realllly strong pee smell! He was anxious to get back out and just stood in the bathroom staring at the back door. Is there a way to tell the difference between the two? The only other thing I can add is that he pee'd twice in the garden as well, once on either side. Does this sound like territory marking?

    Sounds like I should get him neutered though, I wonder if he's heavy enough .. 2.2kg at last weigh in (1.5wks ago).

    Do you have a picture of your free standing run? The back window opens on to our patio so I could possibly stick it there, as long as it looked "in keeping" with the property it may actually work :)
     
  7. jill3

    jill3 PetForums VIP

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    The neutering could be done now if you wanted. My vet told me that it is all down to the genes how big they grow.
    When I had our Lilac British Boy we didn't neuter him till he was about 9 months because he had been very poorly with Tummy problems. The vet advised us to sort the Tummy out first then Neuter. He is not big with jowls but he his Handsome:001_wub:
    We also have cat proofed our garden out selves. As you have 6 foot fencing up already then all you need is some metal elbows and some netting. You could perhaps fix it so you couldn't see from the other side of the fence.
    That way nobody would know and the cat is happy and safe.
     
  8. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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  9. vivien

    vivien PetForums VIP

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    Unfortunately I can't Neuter my Maine coon kitten yogi this month as he should be, because he was very seriously ill and it took 4 weeks to show. We have to build him up first, but he already at5 months is taking on my other 3 big boys and chasing them off :eek: I have known of 2 cases of breeders that I have become friends with their 4 nearly 5 month old kittens being allowed in with the females has mated and successfully sired kittens. So he could well be spraying, I have 3 big breeds and one very big moggy. The 2 ragdolls were done one Simba was done before we got him at 13 weeks and Tiga was done at 5 months. Simba is way bigger than Tiga it is true it's all in the genes how big they get. My moggy Max was also done at 5 months. I am not sure about the chickens though Spid has cats and chickens so she may be able to advise you.
     
  10. LDK1

    LDK1 PetForums VIP

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    Hi,

    Sounds like spraying to me, though even weeing can be a way of territory marking. Doing it indoors can be through frustration too, or a way to get your attention.

    With spraying, they normally do it standing up. The back feet usually lift a little off the ground alternately and the tail is raised and shakes/quivers as they spray. They usually only squat the back end down to the ground when weeing.

    I will see about sorting some pictures at some point, but mine is quite 'make-shift' - there are better ones on the 'cat-run' sticky!
     
  11. Cookieandme

    Cookieandme PetForums VIP

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    Not sure you have a solution, but if you were to cat proof your fencing as just a 6' fence isn't going to be enough then the hens would have to be put away while he is outside, presumably you shut them inside at night anyway.

    There is no way I could spend 2 hours supervising April in a morning, I would have to be up at dawn :eek:
     
  12. Jiskefet

    Jiskefet Slave to the Hairy Hikers

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    A neutered cat grows bigger and sleeker than an unneutered tom, and an entire tom will develop heavier muscles and a broader face.
    However, after neutering, the masculine traits dwindle.

    Of my cats, Romeo and Catweazle were neutered as adults (2½ and 5 years old) and looked like real toms. However, when you look at pics of them then and now, you will see that the typically masculine features disappeared within 6 months post neutering. They no longer have the broad tomcat face or the heavy musculature, though they are still slightly shorter and stockier than the cats that were neutered during adolescence.

    But, in the long run, would a slightly stockier build be worth the risk of spraying and territorial behaviour? I would vote for neutering as soon as possible.
     
  13. Jiskefet

    Jiskefet Slave to the Hairy Hikers

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    As for garden access, I would vote for cat proofing your fence and building a chicken pen he cannot get into.
     
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