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Legislation on cat breeding

Discussion in 'Cat Breeding' started by ses6jwg, Jul 6, 2009.


  1. ses6jwg

    ses6jwg PetForums Newbie

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    .............
     
    #1 ses6jwg, Jul 6, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2010
  2. Milly22

    Milly22 PetForums VIP

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    Sounds like a good idea.

    Whether people who breed their cats 1/2 times per year would take any notice is another question.
     
  3. lizward

    lizward PetForums VIP

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    Very bad idea. First, it won't stop the really unscrupulous. Second, it will lead to lots of abandoned cats as people, find they have a pregnant cat and don't want to fall foul of the law. Third, government action on the Dangerous Dogs issue doesn't give me any confidence at all about their ability to make good laws about animals. Fourth, cats are not small dogs and should not be regulated as if they were. Two litters per year is totally normal for a cat and any attempt to turn this into one litter a year involves either letting the cat scream until she is ill or pumping her full of hormones to shut her up. Both are best avoided IMHO.

    Liz
     
  4. Elmstar

    Elmstar PetForums VIP

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    I think it's a good idea in theory but is unlikely to work and would probably just end up being a money making scheme that penalised the honest people.
     
  5. lauren001

    lauren001 PetForums VIP

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    I think that is the big problem, all the good responsible breeders would be tripping over themselves trying to follow any rules to the letter and paying licence fees on time and the rest wouldn't care a d*mn. In fact it may make the lives of the cats involved worse as they may have to be hidden away in back bedrooms or cellars or the back of garages or in disused property.

    It is a big problem, but education I feel is what is needed to curb the numbers of cats in rescue.
    To stop the numbers of unwanted kittens being born.
    To stop the unthinking one litter/two litter, I didn't know my cat could get pregnant brigade.
    To stop the my cat "needs" one litter.
    To stop the unneutered tom running wild in the neighbourhood.
    To stop people buying from BYBs in the misguided notion that they are "saving" the poor kitten.
    To stop people taking on animals that they cannot care for.
    To stop people having unrealistic expectations of what an animal is, it is not a cute fluffy toy.
     
  6. Saikou

    Saikou PetForums VIP

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    A fine theory, but like everything nowadays it will screw the good breeders to the wall with red tape, rules and licence fees and the unscrupulous breeders who do not give a jot about that now or ever will just continue as they have been.

    I think registering bodies could do alot to curb those producing too many litters from queens in any one year etc, but it would take all of them to have a common ruling on those sorts of things, otherwise those unscrupulous breeders will just registery hop as they do at the moment. It might take curb their breeding habits if the 3rd litter in any year was refused registration, and therefore the kittens had to be sold for less. Those sorts do everything for profit, so its that you have to hit, if you want to stop it.

    Those are just the breeders with registered prefixes, what about those mass producing moggies for profit.
     
    Dozymoo likes this.
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