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Leave them to it or step in?

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by pearltheplank, Jan 9, 2012.


  1. pearltheplank

    pearltheplank PetForums VIP

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    Just wondering peoples thought on this. Its not a problem as yet but obviously don't want it to become one.

    I have kept a male pup from my litter and he is now just over 3 months. My house is bedlam most of the time with the pair of them chasing and playing however come evening and bedtime, mum wants peace which I can understand. If she is on the sofa for example and pup tries to get up with her, she tells him off quite forcefully and he will listen, sometimes taking longer than others

    My question is.........would you leave mum to tell him off or would you step in and tell him yourself?
     
  2. snoopydo

    snoopydo PetForums VIP

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    I'm not sure they do say 1 Trainer/owner is better as they know who the ''leader''' is otherwise it may get confusing...Who doe's he respond to best? What breed is he? Without knowing the Dog/Situation it's hard to advise.
     
  3. pearltheplank

    pearltheplank PetForums VIP

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    I am the only human in the house. They are mum and son Shar Pei

    ETA, just read it back and in case it confuses, the mum referered to is pups mum, not my mum
     
  4. Jugsmalone

    Jugsmalone PetForums VIP

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    I would supervisor them and leave them to it and only intervene if it is going too far i.e. full on attack.
     
  5. snoopydo

    snoopydo PetForums VIP

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    oooop's so sorry I took mum to be your mum :eek:
     
  6. Longton Flyball

    Longton Flyball PetForums Senior

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    Leave mum to tell pup the boundries but be aware and step in when you feel you need to. You know your dogs and will know when enough is enough.

    When we brought Clover home we let her and Duke get to know one another and for Clover to know the boundaries. Even now 9 months on he will tell her when it's time to stop playing with or without him.

    Good Luck :)
     
  7. pearltheplank

    pearltheplank PetForums VIP

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    I did wonder ;) no probs
     
  8. pearltheplank

    pearltheplank PetForums VIP

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    I will carry on as I am then. I guess he is just getting to that cheeky stage and does need to learn and respect all boundaries
     
  9. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    as long as mum has control and as long as she is disciplining pup and he gets the message and backs off. Then I would leave them be. He needs to learn ideally from her when enoughs enough, or he will make her life a nightmare.
    I would only intervene if it comes to a point when no matter how much she tells him off he doesnt start to listen. Then I would step in and offer back up to help her out if needed.

    I did notice though that you refer to the house as bedlam most of the time. Personally I would be taking a lead from mum, and starting him on training and get him to focus and listen to you and get some structure and management in his routine. Nows the time to do it while they are still dependant and eager to please, left another few months, its will be a lot harder when they go through the naughty stage. Older dogs can often teach us things as far as a pup goes and know exactly the ones who need and when to discipline.
     
  10. pearltheplank

    pearltheplank PetForums VIP

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    Thanks, that makes a lot of sense.

    As far as bedlam goes, it is when they are playing which seems to be a fair amount. He is very good for a 3 month old in many ways. He barks when I am preparing his meals but is not allowed it until he is calm for example and he will sit quietly and wait once its ready. If they are getting a treat, both sit on a mat patiently and quietly. We are getting there but its the first time I have had a litter, so wanted to get it right with keeping my pup
     
  11. joanchiu

    joanchiu PetForums Newbie

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    Wow,it is doing so well supervised..very good ... i wish i can do this too:blush:
     
  12. Dober

    Dober PetForums VIP

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    I would also say that it's good for them to have some time appart, especially for training, otherwise they can become too involved wih each other (instead of listening to you!) :) would love to see some pics, I love shar pei :D
     
  13. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    I have to admit, im not in the leave them too it brigade, but i imagine it depends on your individual dogs.

    With one of mine, the more another dog tells him off, the more it spurs him on and the more determined and persistent he becomes.

    This has never happened between my two, so i've no idea if he would be the same with a dog he lived with, but with others, i always step in to stop matters escalating.

    I would of thought for a puppy, it could be quite a fun game.
     
  14. pearltheplank

    pearltheplank PetForums VIP

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    I can see reasons for both sides, so will gauge each situation individually rather than sweepiling say, 'I'll leaver her to it' or the step in

    She (mum) I think is doing a great job. Sometimes Storm, the pup, tries to get her to play, and she will tell him off, then 2 mins later will make him play. Its as if she is saying 'I decide when its playtime'

    Here is the hooligan with his mum

    [​IMG]

    And with his mum and sister

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Dober

    Dober PetForums VIP

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    Oh my gosh they are adorable :) I've only met a few shar pei in real life and they've always been gorgeous.
     
  16. pearltheplank

    pearltheplank PetForums VIP

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    Thank you, :):)
     
  17. Clare7435

    Clare7435 PetForums VIP

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    I've got no advice unfortunately as I'm struggling with fizz and my Dads puppy but i wanted to say those pics are gorgeous ....I love these dogs they're so cute, I'd want to permanently cuddle them :001_wub::001_wub:
     
  18. Rottiefan

    Rottiefan PetForums VIP

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    I, personally, would just manage the situation and train the pup to do a different behaviour. I don't think it's right just to leave it to the Mum, as she is getting distressed by it, and the reactions could be even stronger if this is left.

    I would train a 'Go To Mat' behaviour or 'Place' on a bed or towel or rug, and engage the pup in that at night times. That can be his place and the sofa can be hers. This gives you control and stops the issue between Mum and pup. You can even train Mum this too, and make the atmosphere between them more enjoyable.
     
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