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Lead Training Tips please

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by maisieS, Sep 7, 2009.


  1. maisieS

    maisieS PetForums Newbie

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    We have a wonderful 8 month old Springer Spaniel who tends to be very responsive to commands in the house and off the lead, however as soon we put the lead on she pulls and stops listening. Her nose will be virtually stuck to the floor and that's it... food doesn't get her attention and neither does her favourite ball.

    We've recently bought her a harness, which prevents her straining her neck with the pulling and we're trying out the following technique:

    Keeping her on a short leash on our right hand side and turning around everytime she pulls. She will then stop pulling for a few paces, but soon forgets - we don't get anywhere fast!

    Any ideas?
     
  2. james1

    james1 PetForums VIP

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    typical springer - they are designed to find things im afraid so your going to have troubles for ages yet ;)
    You need to forget buying different collars/harnesses and the like . You need to go out every day and practice a heel command, let her enjoy it and remind her how much of a good girl shes being, this is the only way your going to stop her pulling, though im afraid to say it takes patience and lots of it but you have to realise unless shes under your control shell pull, so get her listenting to you and what you want - enjoy they are top top dogs ;)

    sorry tips lol

    I worte this last week which may give you some ideas
    http://www.petforums.co.uk/dog-trai...-did-you-train-your-dog-walk-loose-leash.html
    reading the situation ahead is just as applicable (the thread above is wih a nervous dog), if you know what is going to take their attention you can focus them on you before you arrive at the situation, making things much easier to control.

    the sit mentioned in the thread is exactly that, if they pull your nice, get their attention and put them in a sit, heel to set off, if they pull again, sit and heel to set off, youll find theres a seasaw montion to you walking and having her sit, though the further you walk the more times you say heel and good girls the more it will sink in as she will be getting further ;)
     
    #2 james1, Sep 7, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2009
  3. maisieS

    maisieS PetForums Newbie

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    Many thanks for the advice!

    We realise that this may take some time and a far bit of patience :) let's see how we get along.
     
  4. Badger's Mum

    Badger's Mum PetForums VIP

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    My springer's 2 and can still be a bugger on the lead:D
     
  5. maisieS

    maisieS PetForums Newbie

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    That's somewhat reassuring, as we see so many springers in our local area who appear brilliant on the lead! our little one is getting slightly better, but i guess we may have to get used to the "who's taking who for a walk" comment until the penny drops. :)
     
  6. Badger's Mum

    Badger's Mum PetForums VIP

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    Lol it does get better, My boy's not that bad anymore Just need a reminder now and again. Is your's working or show type?
     
  7. maisieS

    maisieS PetForums Newbie

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    Maisie's a working type - just out curiousity, aside from the physical, are there any other differences between them?
     
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