Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Keeping Dog in Garden

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by barnesy, Jun 29, 2010.


  1. barnesy

    barnesy PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2009
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am after some advice - my dog has started to get through the hedge into our next door neighbours garden. She can be quite aggressive, so it is frightening for my neighbour.

    We have tried to plug the holes as it were, but she is still finding a way through..

    On talking to my neighbour, who feels he now can't go into his garden, we want to find something that obviously lets my neighbour feel they can go into their garden at any time, whilst Keep the dog out.

    Has anyone any ideas on what is the best way. A farmer by us used an electric fence, however I do not want to go to that extreme, so any one with any and all ideas will be welcome.

    Thanks Sarah
     
  2. hutch6

    hutch6 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Messages:
    4,311
    Likes Received:
    624
    Hi Sarah,

    What reason does your dog have to go next door? What does the dog do in your neighbour's garden?

    Has your dog ever spent any time with your neighbour so they can get to knwo eachother?

    Is the dog left in your garden unsupervised for long?

    Does the dog wander through the hedge when the neighbour comes out?

    What is the dog like if you have it on a lead and your neighbour comes into their garden?

    You can prevent the dog from going next door and you can train it. If you feel confident in training it then we can help with methods and reasons but if you just want to prevent it then build a wall or fence, don't use elcetrified anything or you could end up with even more problems.
     
  3. hawksport

    hawksport Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    9,696
    Likes Received:
    348
  4. barnesy

    barnesy PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2009
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for replying Hutch6,

    She normally goes after our cat, who can getthrough the small holes, that and to confront our neighbour. She seems to be protecting her domain, and does not like our Neighbour.

    It is really difficult, she will bark at him whenever she see's him and he wants to get to know her but she is having none of it.

    My neighbour is willing to work with me to get this resolved and I dont want to make their lives a misery.

    She is very rarely unsupervised in the garden, but occasionally she will be out there, when I am somewhere else in the house.

    Ideally I would like them introduced and to get on. Until such time, it may be a case of taking out the hedge and putting is a fence, which would be a shame, but obviously safer.
     
  5. francesandjon

    francesandjon PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2009
    Messages:
    3,205
    Likes Received:
    41
    What about some wooden posts and wire fencing.....cheap but effective!

    Doesn't look like the nicest thing in the world but does the job.....manages to keep Koda in our garden (it was a quick solution to dog-proofing the garden when we first got him, and is soon to be removed as we are in the process of replacing the proper fence, which was in very poor condition when we moved in).
     
  6. hutch6

    hutch6 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Messages:
    4,311
    Likes Received:
    624
    Can the neighbour come on a walk with you and the dog so they meet ion neutral ground for the first few times so the dog gets used to their scent, their voice and shape etc?

    After that I would walk the dog out on neutral ground again but have the neighbour follow you inside and interact with the dog on it's own turf but the transition from outsdie to inside is nice and smooth so the dog won;t kick up like it would if your neighbour just came round when the dog had been inside for some time. Let the neighbour do a bit of basic training stuff with the dog giving it treats, playing with a ball etc.

    In the meantime ask your neighbour to let you know when they are going to be in the garden and when they are get your dog on a lead, walk to the furthest part of your garden from your neighbour and do some basic training so the dog has to focus on you rather than the neighbour. Don't get frustrated if the dog doesn't focus on your straight away just walk back inside the house , wait 1min away from the view of the nighbour and then walk back out to the furthest part of the garden and try again. Your neighbour must pay no attentiuon to the dog at all even if it is barking and snarling on the lead etc.

    What you want to achieve is to work your basic training position closer towards your neighbour's garden right up to the point where your neighbour can be at the other side of the fence to you and the dog will stil focus on you. At this point ask the dog to sit and get the neighbour to throw some treats to the dog but make sure the dog can see the neighbour is the one handing them out. Again, work your way up to the neighbour askign the dog to sit and giving the dog a treat when it does.

    The dog must always be on a lead during this or any other time in the garden and not allowed out without your supervision to ensure no setbacks are experienced as the chasing and barking etc are probably a learned behaviour so prevention is the key to stop the dog from self rewarding the behaviour or carrying it out.

    Buy your neighbour some treats so that they always have some to bring with them on walks and when they can safley give some to the dog.

    I am so happy your neighbour is willing to work with you on this also. Good on them for not going straight to the council or authorities. Give them a pat on the back from me.
     
  7. barnesy

    barnesy PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2009
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    thanks Hutch, Some great advice and I will look to speak to my neighbour and see what we can do.

    I think initially the working in the Garden with Sandy and Joe on the other side will be a good place to start.

    I will let you know how we get on.

    Thanks for you help..
     
  8. ploddingon

    ploddingon PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    20
    I dont see why your neighbour should have to put up with this to be honest, and is being very good allowing you time to come to some solution.

    Personally I dont see why that solution should involve your neighbour having to get used to your dog, go on walks with you, throw treats to your dog or anything else - they should be allowed to go into their garden in peace and quiet without having to try and train your dog to behave and not be aggressive.

    If you only have a hedge dividing your garden and next door, the dog will continue to break into their garden, so you have to provide a solid and sturdy fence that the dog can't climb over or break down, be it wooden fencing, metal or whatever..

    It might be costly, but is probably the only permanent way to solve this I think
     
  9. hutch6

    hutch6 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Messages:
    4,311
    Likes Received:
    624
    Fair enough but even if you put a fence up or a wall etc the dog wil still bark it's head off at the neighbour so yes they will be able to go out in the safe knolwedge that the dog can not get to them but the noise will get annoying.

    If you don't see why the neighbour should help then you don;t get the meaning of neighbours. This person is offering the OP an amicable and friendly way of resolving the situation without the need for a huge great dividing fence or wall to be erected between neighbours - a barrier. The neighbour could be a dog lover but due to reasons unknown can not own a dog but understands other dog owner's anxieties etc. Not everything is black and white.

    The OP didn't have a choice in how the dog behaved and doesn;t know how to resolve it hence why they are asking on here. If you were more constructive in ideas than barriers then it would be more beneficial.
     
    dodigna likes this.
  10. ploddingon

    ploddingon PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    20
    Can you show me anywhere in the first quotes from the OP where it says that the neighbour is offering help? She says that she will approach the neighbour, nothing more

    Can you highlight anywhere were there is a mention of the neighbour being a dog lover, or understands the dogs anxieties? All that is mentioned is that the OP feels the neighbour would like to get to know the dog.

    You mention about erecting barriers - what is a hedge if not a barrier? If people didnt want 'barriers' around their gardens then everyone would have open plan arrangements!

    The OP actually mentions in one of the posts that she is considering getting a fence, so I am not putting anything in my post that hasn't already been considered.

    As for knowing what neighbours are, I think I have a good idea what that means - it means putting your neighbours property and wellbeing as highly as you would your own, and that includes controlling our pets.

    I appreciate that the OP is trying to find a solution for this problem and that is a credit to her, but the onus is on her to control her dog, and not on the neighbour. In my opinion that means improving an already present 'barrier' to keep the dog in the owners garden.
     
  11. hutch6

    hutch6 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Messages:
    4,311
    Likes Received:
    624
    I have put it in bold for you.

    Precisely why I said the neighbour could be a dog lover. We just don't know the full details or the thread would be much longer so what I wrote is based on the information offered.

    The hedge is already there. We don't know the height of it or what foliage it is made up of therefore we do not know if the neighbour likes to stand and talk over the hedge which would put the hedge at around 3-4 ft or if the neighbour is wanting privacy which would mean a thick ground planting with possible Leylandii conifers with a gap where the dog can get through.

    This is why I mentioned that even with a fence up the dog will still bark at the neighbour so they won't be able to enjoy their garden to the extent that both parties are after - harmony.

    Which is what the neighbour is wanting to work towards instead of taking the common current path of raising concerns straight witht he authorities and why I have put forward ideas for the OP to use to gain control of their dog in this situation. Without having the dog in the environment that dictates the undesired behaviour you can't work at controllign the behaviour fully. If the neighbour is willing to help then you;d be a fool to pass up the opportunity.
     
  12. gskinner123

    gskinner123 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2010
    Messages:
    3,716
    Likes Received:
    1,561
    It's great that the neighbour sounds very nice and is willing to co-operate. But I don't fully understand - why not just put up a solid fence or, as a cheaper alternative, a post and mesh fence? Or is there something I'm missing... apologies if so!
     
  13. hutch6

    hutch6 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Messages:
    4,311
    Likes Received:
    624
    There isn't anything to stop the OP putting up a fence of any kind but from what they are describing the dog will still bark like crazy if it hears or sees the neighbour out in the garden just like one of mine used to. A fence will stop the dog getting through but the training and being familiarised with the neighbour will also train out the barking and the vast majority of the gurading against the neighbour.
     
  14. barnesy

    barnesy PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2009
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    THanks Hutch, for your support.

    Ploddingto - My neighbour does like dogs and wants to get to know my dog.

    My dog is a rescue dog which was beaten and left to scavenge on the streets of Glasgow before spending 2 months at the dog trust where it wouldn't even come out of it kennel.

    She has an inate fear of strangers and particularly old people and men, we are working with a Dog behviourist to try and ease this issue.

    As I have only been in the house 3 years, my neighbour 18 yrs, and the hedge is a typical country mixture if Elderberry, hawthorne, yew, Ivy, plus some other plants, it is well established and high enough for the dog not to jump over, but is sparse in places.

    Hutch6 is absolutely right - just because there is a fence, will not stop her barking. She does not do it with my other neighbour, who is a woman, and has been on walks with us and comes into the house alot.

    I apprecaite I am very lucky with my neighbour, but it is obviously getting to him as he has brought it up - and I don't blame him.

    If we need to errect a fence, then I will, however I wanted to understand if there was a better way for my neighbour, my dog and myself.

    I thank everyone for their help.

    Thanks Sarah
     
  15. dodigna

    dodigna PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,838
    Likes Received:
    83
    I find it really great of you and your neighbour to work a neighbourly way of resolving this! so incredibly rare these days where people just moan moan moan!!!!!
    Hutch has given great advice!!!! Very best of luck to you on this and very well done for being willing to work through your dogs fears! Fearful dogs are a challenge, she is clearly landed her jackpot with you and your helpful neighbour! :)
     
  16. Daggre

    Daggre PetForums Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2010
    Messages:
    247
    Likes Received:
    2
    Iadvise you follow hutch, but as a short term, chicken wire and posts will do-we had to put up a fence behind our growing hedge when we first got Star,and it's been there ever since, not the nicest of things but it's in our garden wasteland bit anyway. However she had never gotten through, and it's quick and easy.
     
  17. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    17,920
    Likes Received:
    11,512
    I agree absolutely with this. You have to sort out a proper fence. Until you have a solid barrier, don't leave your dog loose and unsupervised in the garden.

    You can get a strong washing line or cable and run it down the length of your garden, solidly fixed at each end, above head height. Then you can have a lead on it that will allow the dog some freedom, but not long enough to allow access to the hedge. Having the cable fixed quite high stops it getting tangled.

    It's great that your neighbour is willing to help, and hopefully some relationship with the dog can develop.
     
    #17 Burrowzig, Jun 30, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2010
  18. barnesy

    barnesy PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2009
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Hutch 6,

    I just wanted to let you know, I spoke to my neighbour today, and he is really happy to do the things you have suggested which is great.

    I am also going to put up some chicken wire as I know that will allow the hedge to still grow.

    Interestingly in talking to him, he said he would also love to get a GSD, which will be great, when time allows for him.

    I am hoping this all works out ok.

    Thanks for your advice.

    take care

    Sarah
     
  19. hutch6

    hutch6 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Messages:
    4,311
    Likes Received:
    624
    Very glad to hear it will all work out for everyone with a bit of time and patience.

    Keep us updated with your progress :thumbup::thumbup:
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice