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Just wondered if this is 'normal'?

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by TabithaJ, Jan 3, 2012.


  1. TabithaJ

    TabithaJ PetForums Senior

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    Is it usual for a breeder to charge more for pick of the litter?

    I was just wondering because from time to time I browse various Lab breeders' sites. Today I noticed that not for the first time a particular breeder has two prices, the higher one being for pick of the litter.

    Just wondering if this is something many breeders do?

    Many thanks for any answers :)
     
  2. rocco33

    rocco33 PetForums VIP

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    No, not IMO or experience. Usually breeder (if keeping a pup) has pick of litter and then in order on the waiting list. Besides, what is one person's 'pick' may not be another's. ;) Sounds like a way to get more money to me.
     
  3. Lumikoira

    Lumikoira PetForums Member

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    Completely agree with Rocco, anything else is just (more) money making scheme.....
     
  4. Kinjilabs

    Kinjilabs PetForums VIP

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    Well what difference does it make if they are selling the pick or not?
    Its from the same sire /dam, shouldnt make any difference to the price IMO:)
     
  5. happysaz133

    happysaz133 PetForums VIP

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    It doesn't cost any more to raise the pick of the litter puppy, than it does for the rest of them. It's just the same as charging more for female pups. Wrong.
     
  6. Quiddelbach

    Quiddelbach PetForums Junior

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    In my opinion all puppies should be the same price in a litter, regardless of sex or colour .
     
  7. swarthy

    swarthy PetForums VIP

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    Can only echo what the others have said - NO - it isn't normal. (ETA - posts further along in the thread suggest it might be normal practice for some breeds)

    What does 'Pick' of the litter actually mean?

    Whilst experienced breeders will have a much better handle on what will make the grade in the showring / field - they are not infallible - and there is absolutely no guarantee that pup will grow up to be as promising as he / she was in puppy form - so what are you actually paying the extra for?

    The pup cost the same to breed as it's litter mates.

    You can't even say it's as a breeding prospect - the dog could easily go on to have an unsuitable hip / elbow score or fail it's eye test meaning it cannot be bred from.

    Selling an trained older dog maybe which has obvious show / breeding potential may command a higher price - but certainly not, IMHO, a pup.

    I always keep what I deem to be 'the best' pup in the litter (as do many breeders) - and if someone wanted to show / breed, I would guide them towards my second choice (but make it clear there are no guarantees) -but the price would remain the same - as would my requirements for lifting the breeding endorsements.
     
    #7 swarthy, Jan 4, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2012
  8. Barkie

    Barkie PetForums Senior

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    sticking key, sorry.

    no i don't think it is normal. sounds like charging extra to make more money to me. I wouldn't do it. I'd pick the pup i wanted to keep and I would charge the same price for all the pups since it costs the same to produce any one of them.

    my pick is the one that I like, it probably isn't the one that my partner would pick though, so there's a pick in the sense of one that you like more than another that's all. The one you liked as a puppy may not grow into a dog completely suitable for what you had in mind when you picked it. Also just as a show or breeding prospect puppy could failing to live up to it's potential pups may not later have the physique, the right temperament or the aptitude for work or a sport or pastime that you had imagined you might do with it.
     
  9. Barryjparsons

    Barryjparsons PetForums Member

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    This is normal for many dane breeders and it usually comes down to coat colours and markings. A solid blue can cost £300-£400 more than one with a white blaze.
     
  10. Blondie

    Blondie PetForums VIP

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    Its the norm in the US to sell any show potential pups to show homes for more money than those pups that arent show potential or who arent going to be shown by their owners. Its pretty accepted practice over there, at least in Rotts anyway.
     
  11. swarthy

    swarthy PetForums VIP

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    Interesting feedback - so are we saying that the practice can differ between breeds?

    I know some charge more for chocolate labs - not really sure why because they are not 'rare' - you can specifically breed for chocolates just as you could for black and yellow - so there's no real secret to it other than knowing what colours your dogs are / carry and what possible colour combinations could result from a mating.

    Does this also mean that it is 'easier' in some breeds to pick show potential - or does the same thing happen that a dog showing great promise at 8 weeks, may not have this at 6 months + - and if the same thing happens - how come it is accepted that people pay more for 'litter pick'
     
  12. Blondie

    Blondie PetForums VIP

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    I just put in rotts anyway, coz I dont know about other breeds, lol, as things seem to differ slightly here between breeds, I didnt want to automatically assume ;)

    And only having really picked show potential out of rotts, I wouldnt like to speculate on how 'easy' or not it is in other breeds. Rotts are generally accepted as being at the age of between 6-8 weeks to pick for show potential, usually 7 weeks is the optimum time - they can start to fall to bits after that, lol! And of course, the possibility of a little cracker at 7 weeks old may not be quite the same 'cracker' at 6 months and vice versa. Some rotties look awful all the way through puppyhood and come into their own at a much later age.

    Rotts are the same colour so no reason to differentiate there - although some berks will say they have a 'rare' long haired one and put the price up - or a 'rare' one with white markings, lol!:rolleyes:

    Quite why its so accepted over there I dont really know - I will ask my friend though, and get back to you Swarthy ;)
     
    #12 Blondie, Jan 4, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2012
  13. swarthy

    swarthy PetForums VIP

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    Thanks - I am not criticising, I am genuinely curious -

    Labs are the same - you have to 'pick' the right time between 6 and 8 weeks - I can remember picking the pup who was going to France - masses of photos and conversations - then just a few days after we chose - I looked at her and thought "OMG - what I have done" :eek:

    But she came good and turned into a cracker - it was a shame her owner's health didn't allow her to keep showing her - hey ho - such is life :rolleyes:

    But you are right - they can go through all sorts of growth phases - my eldest yellow did - she did well as a puppy from about 9 months onwards - and then went completely off the boil at around 14 months through to around 20 months to the extent I nearly gave up showing - then she just kept getting better and better (and then she injured her leg :mad::rolleyes:) so isn't really shown now apart from the odd small local show - a shame as she was only a couple of points of her Show Certificate of Merit and regularly getting 4ths and 5ths in Limit and Open at CH shows :rolleyes:
     
  14. Ridgielover

    Ridgielover PetForums Senior

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    It is so interesting how things vary between breeds. With Ridgebacks, it is the usual practice to charge less for mismarked puppies (incorrect ridges, no ridges, excess white or black etc)
     
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