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Just poking my head in to say hello. Also have a question or two.

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by John-W, Dec 28, 2020.


  1. John-W

    John-W PetForums Junior

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    So, I signed up recently as I had gotten an older (19 week old) kitten, who is now called Váli. He's very shy, but he's coming around well, I think he may have been taken as a kitten and treated badly and seeing him on gumtree in mid December I didn't want him to end up being somebody's 'Christmas kitten'. The first few days he mostly spent hiding then the next few he spent exploring and he was ever watchful; I think he's only really started to relax now.
    I made a thread about him not playing at around the 7 day mark of him being here as he wasn't reacting to toys in a playful manner, just a watchful manner, however thankfully it seems to just have been anxiety that's been holding him back as I had him running and jumping around his 'safe square' as I call it since he seems to like to divide a room up into different squares for different things, for example he has one square where he doesn't like going which is nearest the door, although I always call out his name before coming in so he knows who is at the door and that I'll be coming in, one for playing but he has his second bed there as it's under a radiator, which you can see a photo of him sleeping in. Then a food and water square, a litter square and an overlapping square which overlaps the litter and water with a second bed he made for himself out of some piled clothes. He really seems to have turned a corner over the past day or two and is learning to trust me and understand that not all people are bad, as I think he may have had a bad experience earlier in life.
    He's going to be booked into the vet's for a check-up in early January and I'll see about getting him chipped either then on the spot or having him chipped as he's getting neutered as microchip needles are huge and don't look one bit comfortable, so better to have it done while he's sedated/anaesthetized as if he's not going out for about 4-6 more weeks, depending on his progress he may as well get all the jabs and cuts done in one go while he can't feel them.

    I do have a question or two and the first is about the safety of lasers as toys. I've seen if he was interested in one by using a very low power, low battery (it probably couldn't light a wall 6 feet away in a bright room) but there are brighter lasers out there. I have a few very bright ones which I won't be using as cat toys as I feel they're just too powerful; the green and blue ones can leave 'laser lines' when shone up in the sky, green lasers are also infrared activated so one which appears dead can still be giving off a laser beam that you can't see. However if anyone knows about the safety of lower powered red lasers as cat toys, let me know. I'll do some research myself and ask the vet when I visit too.
    Second question is about cat litter. Is there a preferred type? Is some potentially harmful (kind of like how talcum powder can contain asbestos) or is it all very similar except for clumping, non-clumping and wood based? Any preferred choice over here? My budget is a bit tight but I don't want to be doing him any harm and can see that I get him the best I can. My previous cat never used cat litter except for when he had staples in from an injury and had to stay indoors due to wearing the cone of shame, which I'm never putting on a cat again if I can help it as it was so detrimental to his mood that I'll be getting a cat cover/suit so they have full field of view and can eat properly. Instead he just went outdoors and used a patch at the top of my back garden.

    See attached a photo of Váli. Taken with a telephoto lens as to not disturb him, however when I did approach he just did a few rolls and snuggled down into his bed.
     

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  2. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    Hello John, welcome to the forum.
    I'm moving this post to Cat Chat as you'll get more responses there.:)
     
  3. Charity

    Charity Endangered Species

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    Vali is a beautiful boy and we look forward to more photos as he grows. Cats have differing characters same as us, my two are like chalk and cheese, one is quite outgoing and friendly while the other wouldn't say boo to a goose and runs away at the slightest thing. I'm glad Vali is playing now he's settled and more confident.

    My personal opinion is I don't like lasers full stop so don't use them.

    As for cat litter, there are several different types on the market which are supposedly safe. I prefer wood chip as I find it cleaner and doesn't track on the carpets like some others. I'm currently trying the new Greenwoods plant litter which is a clumping one but that's a nightmare for tracking and making a mess. Pets at Home sell 30L bags of their own brand wood chip litter for £7.49 which I think is pretty good. Others are Sanicat or Breeder Celect. I'm sure others will recommend different ones. :)
     
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  4. Babyshoes

    Babyshoes PetForums VIP

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    Hi and welcome!

    He'll take time to fully settle but it does sound like he's getting there. I look forward to more photos when you're able to get them.

    Microchipping looks like it should be painful, but I've seen it done many times, both in person and in videos, and the animal never reacts much beyond an occasional flinch. That said, most vets are happy to do it at the same time as neutering for convenience.

    I can't answer your question about lasers I'm afraid, but I do use a toy one marketed for cats. It's clearly not very powerful but I do still take care not to shine it in anyone's eyes.

    There are as many opinions about litter as there are types of litter. I would suggest you provide at least 2 boxes, and try different litters in each to see what works for you both. I find the clay types dusty and difficult to clean when it sticks to the box. I've tried loads, some smell worse than others, and I think part of that is down to your cat and how they use the box, how much they dig, cover etc.
    I'm currently using crystal litter in several boxes and wood based in one, as I have multiple cats. I find the crystal type good for reducing urine smell, but it's quite crunchy and some cats seem to dislike the texture.

    In terms of going outside, I generally suggest waiting until the cat is around a year old. (Some will say you shouldn't let them out at all/only on a harness/build a catio/cat proof your garden etc. The discussions can get quite heated. It's all good advice, but you'll need to make your own decision based on your circumstances.)

    Before the age of a year, they are technically still kittens, and have the self preservation instincts of most adolescents, of any species... Allowing them out for the first time later than that makes it more likely that they'll get home again. I also suggest getting a microchip cat flap with a curfew mode so you can automatically keep him in overnight, as well as stopping other cats coming in and stressing him out. If you can't afford the version with curfew mode, a basic microchip one will be fine to keep other cats out, you'll just need to manually lock it at night.
     
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  5. John-W

    John-W PetForums Junior

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    Thanks for the replies so far. I currently have Váli staying in the upstairs front room where he spends most of his time, except for when I'm on my rowing machine which is unfortunately in the same room, though I spent a week or so off it so he could acclimate however I used to weigh 130kg (about 20 stone) and had cut down to 85kg (about 13.4 stone) over the course of a year (although I increased to just shy of 87kg come the new year) so I need to keep my weight down and stay healthy, especially as it's doctors orders due to having an injured leg and the more weight put on it the more damage gets done over time. However when I start rowing he will run behind a box and then out of the room and has been spotted in two different places. The previous time I used the rowing machine he hid in the hallway and then went to the living room where he stayed behind the couch until I carried him back up, however he is now walking himself back up so hopefully that's a sign that me rowing isn't going to cause him harm and when he walks himself back upstairs he immediately goes to his bowl and isn't afraid of being petted, in fact he parades himself around his bowl when hungry which is a good sign.
    One thing I noticed this evening which may explain why he's had an 'accident' on his bedding (changed for different bedding so he doesn't associate one thing with another) is that when I started rowing I had put a litter tray into the kitchen expecting him to jump up onto a chair as they're padded and warm, but I found him lying in the litter tray. As such I'll be putting a blanket (rubbed with his scent) into some shallow boxes in every kitten proofed room I have.

    He sees the vet on Wednesday and will be getting an examination, chipped, vaccinated and booked in for neutering. Personally I kind of want to hold off on neutering until he's developed some secondary sex characteristics as I'd like to have a cat that's a tomcat than a cat eunuch, although my thinking may be entirely wrong when it comes to this and neutering sooner than later may well be best, though he will be kept inside until he's neutered anyway.
    I'll be glad to bring him to the vet, he has been coughing a little and that has me worried; especially as the cancer in my last cat absolutely blindsided me as he was the toughest cat ever and I think he hid it from me for a long time, even befriending a neighbours cat which was very out of the ordinary for him but before and after he had to be put down that other cat came in through the (now sealed) cat flap just to be curious but was well fed and collared so I would let it be curious but not feed it. But I digress, hopefully the vet can let me know why it is that he's coughing and have it treated if it's anything bad.

    One question I have for everyone here is that lots of online videos and written guides seem to advise that once a kitten is playing and able to be petted that you eventually move onto putting the kitten up on your lap and holding it there while petting. I'm not sure about this and think it may end up undoing a lot of the work I put into gaining his trust. I've picked him up by the neck before and that seems to be the only way to pick him up (the maelstrom of claws hissing and spitting I got when I tried lifting him under his armpits makes me feel like he really doesn't like being picked up, maybe he was originally homed with lots of kids and was picked up when he was younger however he has to get used to being lifted and held at some point but I don't want to force this on him. If anyone has any suggestions that would be great. Thanks!
     
    #5 John-W, Jan 3, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2021
  6. Douglas’ Dad

    Douglas’ Dad PetForums Senior

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    Hi John. The reaction to the rowing is part of his ASR (acoustic startle reflex) ie his response to sudden sounds which can stress a cat out. As a rowing machine does make a lot of noise this will startle him until he realises it isn’t dangerous. Even then (and this might not be apparent) it might be stressing him imperceptibly which is always an issue for young male indoor cats who are at higher risk of FIC, which if it develops into a urethral block, can be very dangerous for a male cat. So why not invest in a couple of igloo beds (proven to reduce stress levels as it provides enclosed safety) so he has somewhere to dash to when he is unsure which are nicer than boxes. Amazon have some nice ones. Hiding is part of a cat’s stress coping mechanism and shouldn’t be interfered with. It helps the cat calm down. I would not pick him up if he doesn’t like it unless it’s essential (eg putting him in the carrier for the vet). Again there is nothing to be gained by stressing him out. If he is going to develop into a lap cat, he will do it in his own time, just like mine did (3 years later!). Many cats do not like being picked up ever and that’s ok. It’s their prerogative. Some are ok with it when kittens but hate it when adults (eg BSHs).

    I’m assuming you’re feeding him wet food? Dry food is definitely not appropriate.
     
    #6 Douglas’ Dad, Jan 3, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2021
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  7. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Hi John-W - I am pleased to hear that Vali is now playing more than he was the last time we spoke, in your previous thread. Well done for your patience and perseverance.

    With regard to neutering, there would be no advantage to delaying it past the age of 5 months (unless the vet advises delay due to a medical reason such as a retained testicle, or an illness of some kind making it unsafe for Vali to have a G.A.)

    For Vali to acquire permanent male physical characteristics you would need to leave him un-neutered until around the age of 14 to 18 months. In other words you would need to leave him un-neutered until his growth plates have closed naturally. Meanwhile he would have developed the typical behaviour of an un-neutered tom cat e.g. spraying urine indoors, fighting with other male cats, and constantly searching for un-spayed female cats to mate with. If you keep him indoors once he is sexually mature, until he is neutered, he is likely to howl at the windows to get out, especially during the times (March to October) when most entire female cats will be "in season". And he may find a way to slip out of the house somehow.

    One of my own male cats is a rescued stray who was about 18 months old when I adopted him. I had him neutered and by then his growth plates had already closed. Therefore he has the smaller stocky appearance of an un-neutered male cat. His face is wider, his neck is thicker, his legs are shorter, his body is stockier. [ My other male cats, who were neutered before their growth plates were closed have long legs and are long in the body - typical of neutered male cats.].

    However my male cat who was neutered late also has the habit of spraying urine in the house, and is extremely territorial about his home and garden, so he fights frequently with my neighbour's male cats causing nasty injuries to himself. The neighbour's cats are both neutered males and a good bit bigger than my boy, so he always seems to come off worse, with cat bites that turn into abscesses, and other painful injuries. He is now aged over 11 and is at last calming down a bit.

    Really it is not practical or wise to keep an un-neutered adult male cat in the house. Worth noting that most pedigree stud cats have their own outside pen to live in.

    With regard to your other question about picking up a cat or having them on your lap. I would never pick a kitten or a cat up by the scruff (the back of the neck) unless it was an absolute emergency.

    My two girls aged 7 yrs old do not like being picked up, and never have done since they were kittens. Over a period of several years I trained them gradually to accept being picked up for a couple of minutes and then replaced on the floor. The signal to put them down is the very instant they start to move. Preferably learn to sense this and put them down just before they have had enough.

    I rarely pick up my girls anyway. Days can go by without me doing so. There is no need to force an action on a cat which they do not like. Unless as I said before, it is an emergency. Otherwise the cat should have their feelings respected and be allowed to have as much control as possible over what happens to them physically.

    Neither of my girls are lap sitters and that is fine with me. One of them will sit next to me on the sofa and that is lovely. But it is entirely up to her if she does that.

    There is no way I would ever make any of my cats sit on my lap while I forced them to endure being stroked whether they liked it or not. You are unlikely to gain your kitten's trust if you do that, and are more likely to make your kitten very wary of you. So I advise you to ignore any videos telling you it is a good idea. It is likely to make the cat mistrust you and possibly lash out at you.

    Let Vali decide for himself what he wants to do, and how he wants to relate to you. Continue the play sessions as you have been and let him develop his character and his preferences in his own time at his own pace. That is how to raise a happy, trusting cat.
     
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  8. John-W

    John-W PetForums Junior

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    I typed half of this post up before getting Váli his afternoon meal, I've noticed an issue with his eye. Should I try and get him bumped up the vet waiting list and in tomorrow? Edit: I'm going to see if I can change his vet visit on Wednesday for an appointment tomorrow and if they're fully booked (hopefully not) I can get him in early on Tuesday.

    @Douglas’ Dad Yeah he's being fed wet food designed for cats aged 2-12 months. I'll see about getting some igloo beds, in the interim I'll put down a few boxes with bedding (he has plenty of bedding in his main room but he likes to flee when I get on the rowing machine. Hopefully he'll get used to it, the last cat I had would occasionally walk in and watch me for a minute before casually walking out, however he took lots of patience and care before he fully trusted me too.

    @chillminx
    Thanks for all the information. I think one of the reasons I don't want him neutered so soon (however you've given me plenty of reason to change my mind) is due to me not knowing when my last cat was neutered and he was a bit of a roamer and hunter. However I've just been in to check on Váli and have seen something pretty worrying. When he arrived he'd lost a good bit of fur on his nose and this had grown back, today when I came in to give him his second feed and a bit more attention than his morning feed I've noticed that what was a watery eye last night is now a swollen inner eyelid and looks much more concerning. I've only noticed it now halfway through making this post which is why this post doesn't really follow a "there's a problem" line but starts off like everything is okay.
    See below image and the other attached image:
    Vali eye 2.JPG
     

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    #8 John-W, Jan 3, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2021
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  9. Douglas’ Dad

    Douglas’ Dad PetForums Senior

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    He is a gorgeous boy! As some will know on here, I’m usually not the first to recommend a vet visit at the drop of a hat simply because the visit itself can be stressful for a cat and a phone consult can often do the job. But in this case I think he might need a visit so yes try and get in tomorrow even if you can. It may be something really straightforward which can be dealt with eye drops so you’ll be glad you did. If you have pet insurance many offer free online consults 24/7 with a vet who can give advice too. You just need to make sure your cat is visible on camera. If you aren’t insured you can pay yourself. I think Vets First charge £25.
     
  10. John-W

    John-W PetForums Junior

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    He was already booked in for an in person vet visit with a vet very near to my house (there's a tangent coming up, I'll but an <end tangent> if you just want to read quickly) <start tangent> , compared to the PDSA pet hospital which I'm eligible for but it's quite a distance (maybe 25-30 minutes) and I still won't forget my last cat howling on his way there; or the very distanced measures they took which meant I never really got a chance to say goodbye, but he needed an inspection, either sedation or anaesthesia (I'm assuming general anaesthesia, probably ketamine and diazepam but maybe inhalational anaesthesia like desflurane) as I was told that he might not make it through 'sedation' whereas sedation is usually an anti-adrenergic which can make a cat very tired but can be quickly reversed) X-ray and ultrasound then when they found that he was (in their words) "riddled with tumors" he had to be put down and I wouldn't have been able to afford all of the imaging. I did ask the vet to be honest and say that if I had caught it early (he did come in and meow a bit however I just gave him attention, however I'm now probably over-attentive to a pet's behaviour) but the vet said he would have had slim to nil chances even if caught early and aggressively treated, I'm not sure if they were 100% honest even though I asked for a straight answer but as said, I'm now much more watchful. <end tangent>
    Váli was initially booked in for Wednesday and as stated this place is a short drive from my and he was booked to get microchipped, vaccinated and examined (as well as a month or so of free pet insurance, which I'm not too sure about getting, being PDSA eligible until I finish my undergraduate degree as I have a pretty bad leg injury that needs surgery however the long drive has me sitting on the fence and it would really depend on pricing. Hopefully I can get him moved up to an appointment tomorrow or Tuesday even though I'm 'in class' (which with distance learning means sitting somewhere comfortable with my second hand gumtree laptop. If I need to take time 'out of class' I'll make sure to still be watching my class livestream from the vets until Váli is called in and my tutors will likely be quite understanding to the situation as I've not missed a class so far this year.
    Honestly I just want the best start for him as he seems to have been raised in pretty tough conditions.
     
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  11. Douglas’ Dad

    Douglas’ Dad PetForums Senior

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    You sound like a fantastic owner. Committed and serious. I’m sure your lecturers would understand if you had to miss a class. I bet they have pets too. Let us know how he gets on. He is very cute.
     
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  12. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @John-W - his eye looks very sore. I really would get him a vet appointment tomorrow Monday. Eyes are such delicate things, eye injuries and eye infections need prompt treatment.
     
  13. John-W

    John-W PetForums Junior

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    He saw the vet today, just a short 5 minute drive from the house. Got inspected and prescribed antibiotics and eye drops. Vet said it seemed like a mild case of kitten flu but to keep him in as stress free environment as possible and to give him his antibiotic (doxybactin) once a day and eye drops (fusidic acid) twice daily if I can get them in, £50 for a 10 minute consultation seems steep as I could have said antibiotics and eye drops however what antibiotics and what eye drops I couldn't have said he needed; which reminds me of a saying I heard:
    A mechanic finishes fixing up an engine and says that it'll be £150. The customer asks what was wrong and the mechanic replies that the engine was missing a bolt. The customer exclaims at the cost of £150 for a single bolt, the mechanic says that it wasn't so much the cost of the bolt but knowing that one was needed, what type was required and where to put it.
    So the cost might have seemed high (for me) but I couldn't have gotten it done myself and the vet there is much better (and much nearer) than the PDSA so I'll have to just live with a little less luxury for a while, it was worth it to see that Váli should be okay. He's booked in for another appointment (microchipping, vaccination and another check up) next week, the vet said it would be safer to vaccinate after he gets better as to not overly stress his immune system.
    As for stress, I've moved the rowing machine downstairs where he won't have to see or hear it until he's better and more accustomed to the house. He is coming along well however as after getting his antibiotic and first eye drop (I assume there's a knack to eye drops, much hissing and fighting was involved with the first) he immediately asked me for food by sitting by his bowl then after eating started playing in his cat tunnel (I got a small one from B&M as they tend to do good cheap pet stuff) so I decided to see if he'd play with the 'rope on a rod' style toy made from paracord with it's 7 strands of nylon 'guts' hanging out about 5cm and the other end tied to a broken archery arrow, which he immediately went racing around the room after, hiding and pouncing and rolling over to grab at it and chew it, so he bounced back well all things considered.

    Edit: Just a 'quick' (it turned into a wall of text) update. Maybe it's just him getting more accustomed to a home life but in the 10 or so hours of his first dose of antibiotics and eye drops (he's made a few holes in my hand from eye drops but I think my method is getting better and less stressful for him) he seems to have made another big change in that he seems to be breathing a little more easily and eating more food, not to mention he was practically running up the walls playing. I've been mainly playing using a standard rod type toy but he goes crazy over a laser (1mw red laser, part of a spirit level which at first mention sounds dodgy but compared to amazon or ebay lasers building equipment from a trusted manufacturer (Bosch) has to go through plenty of tests and quality control so the cheap amazon lasers are more likely to be over their rating than a tested piece of equipment, at least I would assume this is the case, however I want to get him one that's half the power and not cheap just in case) which I've been taking great care not to get close to his (one already sore) eyes either through direct beam or reflection, so basically on carpet or up the wall and ceiling (he seems to love tracking it over the ceiling only to run to the other end of the room to 'catch' it as it moves down the wall, though I've mainly used the rod style toy but for all the stress of the vet he seems to have doubled in energy and confidence. He did go exploring when I left his door open and ended up in my (not yet kitten proofed bedroom) so I had to usher him out but he left tail up and immediately checked the bathroom (all cleaning fluids kept downstairs, in a cupboard) having a sniff at everything before deciding he would rather go back to his room where a bit of food awaited him, some felix as good as it looks mixed with a little of the high meat/fish content (50%) food B&M sells for 49p a pack sachet.
    So he's doing well and seems to be on the mend. He also seemed to really appreciate the moving of the rowing machine(although this won't be permanent, just until he gets used to moving room) as he was fast asleep in his bed when I'd finished a 30ish minute/1000 strokes workout.

    PS: Not sure if it was mentioned in this thread or another but since I want him to be indoor/outdoor I've been taking a serious look at microchip catflaps, especially one that can let me know when he comes and goes as well as lock out on certain dates (around halloween/new years) even if I have to save for the more expensive type.
     
    #13 John-W, Jan 4, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2021
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  14. John-W

    John-W PetForums Junior

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    If anyone is curious he's coming along well (on the sociability side of things) and is learning very fast, though I try to44%[ at least an hour of time into giving him attention, playing with him, etc.
    He really seems to enjoy playing but is resting at the minute and I don't want to over stress his breathing. He's now very happy to be cuddled up to and will come when I call (in fact he's somewhat taken to following me around the house) and doesn't mind being picked up under the shoulders and held until he wants down, I started that by putting two hands on him and reaching under him then lifting slightly, letting him walk off and get a treat and one afternoon when he seemed quite h 56 7}0p}}}}appy to let me pick him up and hold him, purring away for about 30 seconds before he pushed off and I let him down and gave him a treat (some dry food which he really, really likes, I checked with my vet and was told it was absolutely fine so long as he had wet food and/or water though I'm still sticking to about 5-10g a time up to maybe 25g of dried in a day as it does dehydrate cats) but it's good that he's more used to human contact now, at least from me as he's still very cautious around anyone else.

    On the other hand he seems to have picked up a pretty bad chest infection and was at the vets again today and got more doxycycline and some sort of long lasting antibiotic that wasn't named and I was too busy to be curious as to what it was. After the vet visit he had a very long, relaxed sleep and seemed to be feeling better though his breathing is still fairly crackly, somewhat between bubble wrap and someone distantly walking on thick wet gravel, both audibly normally and using a stethoscope I borrowed from a friend. while not a trained professional acustilation is only one small part of medical practice and as such you can pick up the basics fairly quickly (at least now that we have the Internet) however more complex things like locating and defining each heart valve; bicuspid, mitral and pulmonic if I remember biology correctly, would take significant learning and practical work but lung sounds are more simple enough as a whooshing of air is normal and any crackles or pops or wheezes are abnormal and at that point you need to see a medical professional and let them have a listen. I was told it was more than likely mycoplasma and that a longer dose of antibiotics is usually needed, hopefully this fixes it as it will require involved diagnostic medicine next such as x-Ray imaging or biopsy which means he would have to be taken to the PDSA as I simply can't afford that, however he is getting very used to being in a carrier now, whereas he wet himself within a minute of his first ever carrier journey to my house, now he looks around everywhere as the carrier has clear sides but I would rather he got better and didn't need more treatment.
    Side note, although my local vets are great I hate the fact they have to go with brand name antibiotics, they cost at least 20 times more than the generic stuff, granted generics may come in a capsule and I have been told to "empty the capsule out onto a hard surface and separate by eye using a razor blade or something similar" when helping my last cat with a fungal infection. Maybe the vet only non generics have a flavouring in them, the cat seems to eat crushed up tablets in food quite happily, I'm not sure what doxycycline tastes like but I have a few 100mg capsules of expired doxy (only expired by 4 months, but expired doxy can wreck your kidneys so it isn't worth the risk in human use and especially not animal use as an animal can't exactly consent to risking their kidneys) so I'll taste a miniscule amount of that 'for science' before throwing them out.

    Edit, here's a picture of him. No long telephoto lens needed, he's perfectly comfortable with me coming right up to him now.
    Sorry about the broken image link images, can't seem to edit them out.
    He's grown. 20210127_022346.jpg
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    #14 John-W, Jan 27, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2021
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  15. ChaosCat

    ChaosCat PetForums VIP

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    That’s a nice long update! Good to hear he is becoming so comfortable with you, not so good to hear about the chest infection. But you are dealing with that, so hopefully it will be fine soon.
     
  16. white_shadow

    white_shadow PetForums Member

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    Hi @John-W

    Nice to hear how well he's adjusting and bonding !

    Two points for you, both about these antibiotic meds....
    1. Doxycycline has the potential to damage the esophagus, no matter which form of the drug is used. Prevention is easy as it involves feeding a small amount of wet food/liquid after each dosing. There's an excellent Veterinarian's article with info on this right here - the esophageal info is a little buried in there but still easy to find.
    2. The 'long lasting antibiotic' he was given is most likely "Convenia". Most of the time it 'works' quite well, but sometimes there are quite severe side effects. It wouldn't hurt to be aware of all that - the same Veterinarian has an article on Convenia too, here
    You know, pictures can be great periodic updates as well..........and, no one here will ever object to those !
    .
     
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  17. Douglas’ Dad

    Douglas’ Dad PetForums Senior

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    Hmmmm. Your vet is not an expert on feline nutrition. Dry food is rarely advisable unless there is a specific reason (cat will absolutely not eat wet food for example).
     
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  18. Douglas’ Dad

    Douglas’ Dad PetForums Senior

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    Ask them for a prescription and get it dispensed online. You will find the generic version easily.
     
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  19. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @John-W - I am very pleased to hear your little guy is doing so well, coming on in leaps and bounds by the sound of things - well done! :)

    One of my rescued cats has upper respiratory infections from time to time and I use liquid doxycycline which can be added to his food. I have never had the least problem getting him to take it. To a human's nose the liquid version has virtually no odour to it, [unlike the tablet version] and although it may well have more of an odour to a cat's keener sense of smell, evidently not enough of an odour or taste to put my boy off eating his food.

    The liquid doxycycline has to be ordered by the vet from a lab in Oxford, UK. It is not cheap, [i.e. it is dearer than the tablets], and if cost is an issue it is probably not accessible for you. What I like about it particularly is the fact it is so easy to administer, so no struggles to get the stuff into him.
     
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  20. cheekyscrip

    cheekyscrip Pitchfork blaster

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    My cat had doxy and it helped with his chest infection pretty quickly.
    All the best, your boy is gorgeous.
     
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