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'Just one litter'.

Discussion in 'Cat Breeding' started by Ceiling Kitty, Jun 10, 2018.


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  1. Ceiling Kitty

    Ceiling Kitty Hides away from much through humour...

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    I would just like to say that 'just one litter' is rarely that.

    1. If you make the decision to let your unspayed queen outside to breed indiscriminately, or keep her with an unneutered male, the chances are she's going to get out again after the kittens are born and end up pregnant for a second time. That's at least two litters. Keep them inside, neuter your males.

    2. If you want a litter of kittens 'as a lovely experience for the children', your children are likely to want to do the same with their own cats, should they own any when they are older. That's another two, three, four, five+ litters. Instead, teach your children the importance of responsible cat ownership and set them an example by neutering your cats.

    3. If the 'loving homes' you've found for your kittens all decide to do the same thing and have 'just one litter', you are perpetuating a cycle. That's another two, three, four+ litters. You may be able to locate good homes for your cat's kittens, but you now have no control over their 'grandkittens'. They could end up anywhere.

    4. If you own the unneutered father as well, and he is going out, he will mate with any unspayed females he comes across. That's an indefinite number of litters (plus a nice FIV risk).

    It never is 'just one litter', is it? And people who choose to do this AREN'T THE ONES WHO PICK UP THE PIECES. That falls to the rest of us, who are pulling dead kittens out of dustbins, doing the C-sections of the labours that went wrong and having to deliver dead kittens, and euthanasing the surrendered cats with potentially treatable diseases that have no chance of being rehomed because the country's rescue centres are so overrun with cats that they're turning them away.

    All the above are things I have had to do, or directly watched a colleague have to do, this year alone.

    I'm sorry for the rant, but I'm so sick of trying to encourage and educate about responsible cat ownership when it doesn't seem to sink in. The number of people I've urged to neuter their cats rather than choose that 'just one litter' route, who decide to go ahead anyway, is absolutely breaking my heart.

    There is no end.

    If you are planning 'just one litter', please PLEASE reconsider!!!
     
  2. kittih

    kittih PetForums VIP

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    Very well said.

    I would add that if someone has the overwhelming urge to watch the "miracle of birth" or let their children experience it then, instead of putting your cat through that why not volunteer to foster a pregnant cat. You and your family can experience the highs and lows with the support of the rescue and help a cat in need. Win win.
     
    KarlaD85, Calvine, chillminx and 6 others like this.
  3. Bertie'sMum

    Bertie'sMum Obedient Cat Slave

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    @Ceiling Kitty - I so agree with everything you've said.

    "An average cat has 1-8 kittens per litter and 2-3 litters per year. During her productive life, one female cat could have more than 100 kittens. A single pair of cats and their kittens can produce as many as 420,000 kittens in just 7 years."
    and that's just only one pair of cats - if the male is mating with other queens in the neighbourhood the numbers don't bear thinking about.
     
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  4. ChaosCat

    ChaosCat PetForums VIP

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    The great problem is that you can only reach so many persons who think that way. Some just can’t be bothered, some feel offended by being ‘lectured’, some want to do it but never seem to find the time...

    It’s only a handful of well meaning but ill informed persons that thank you for the advise and follow it.
    Very frustrating indeed.
     
    Ceiling Kitty likes this.
  5. Calvine

    Calvine PetForums VIP

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  6. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    I' ve made this a sticky.
     
    chillminx, AmsMam, moggie14 and 2 others like this.
  7. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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    I've made this a sticky.
    Sadly the trouble is that by the time most people in this situation come here and read it, it is already too late :(
    Cross posted with @SusieRainbow
     
  8. Ceiling Kitty

    Ceiling Kitty Hides away from much through humour...

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    You're right Lynn, and for me this was just a bit of a rant last night - but I guess now we can try to include some practical advice for anyone who is in this situation already, on what they can do to help.


    I would suggest:

    1. If your cat is already pregnant, you can still spay her. This will humanely terminate the pregnancy and prevent any further ones at the same time. If your vet says they cannot spay a pregnant cat, find another; most will. I will not comment on the religious or ethical opinions of other people regarding the termination of pregnancy, but I will give my own, which is that cats are not religious nor do they have any ethics, and for me the welfare of the cat trumps any human beliefs.

    2. If she is pregnant and you still wish to continue the pregnancy, keep her indoors. She may plead to get out after the kittens are born. Ignore her. If she is allowed out, she can become pregnant again even though she is still nursing a litter. Keep the number of litters you are dealing with to just one: keep her inside and spay her promptly. Cats can be spayed within weeks of giving birth; it will not significantly affect their milk production.

    3. If you own the father, neuter him immediately.

    4. Give strong consideration to having the kittens neutered before they go to their new homes. Yes, this will cost you. Yes, it means you will need to keep the kittens for longer than you may have originally planned (they technically shouldn't go to new homes until 12-13 weeks anyway, though many re-home younger). I'm afraid that's part of raising kittens responsibly. Kittens can be neutered from 12 weeks. If your vet won't neuter at that age, don't stop there - plenty will: check the Kitten Neutering Database to find one. http://www.kind.cats.org.uk Neutering the kittens before you re-home them is the only way you will have any control over their reproductive future.

    5. Please spread the word to friends and family. Tell them that cats can get pregnant from 5-6 months of age; that they can have multiple litters back-to-back; that brothers and sisters from the same litter can mate; that cats have no need nor desire to give birth and this is a human want we've forced onto them. And please teach your children how to own cats responsibly.


    There is a reason that Cats Protection, RSPCA, Blue Cross, Battersea, PDSA, International Society of Feline Medicine, Wood Green, British Small Animal Veterinary Association and the GCCF are ALL actively trying to discourage the 'just one litter' approach. These organisations and charities are not wrong, they know what they are talking about. Please think hard and twice before deciding to fly in the face of their recommendations.
     
  9. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    Locking now to ensure the posts remain easily visible
     
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  10. ChaosCat

    ChaosCat PetForums VIP

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    To 3. I would like to add that the male cat can still impregnate the cat for up to 10 weeks after castration.
     
    Ceiling Kitty likes this.
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