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Jumping on Strangers

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by jazzy3, Jan 31, 2019.


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  1. jazzy3

    jazzy3 PetForums Newbie

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    My dog is a little over a year and he has always had the problem of getting “overly” excited when he meets strangers. Every time someone walks through the door he jumps on them and tries to put their hands in his mouth. He stops once I yell at him now, but it is really bad when we are on walks.

    He waits all cute and lays down waiting for the stranger to come closer and then lunges at them. He would never hurt them and they can tell he is a “puppy,” but that is not good behavior for a dog to have. He just wants to play, but this is something I want to stop asap.

    I usually just pull him to the side away from the people walking by, but there are situations where we can’t.
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    What about training an alternative and incompatible behaviour like a sit (he cannot sit and jump at the same time). So when someone approaches, get him into a sit and reward with several tiny pieces of a good reward (to keep them coming and keep him sitting while the person passes). Yelling won't help, he won't know what he isn't supposed to do, he will just know that you have become loud and shouty. You might also want to have a look at Susan Garrett's video 'It's her choice' on YouTube to start him on impulse control. At a year he won't have his puppy license much longer so you really need to get on top of this.
     
  3. jazzy3

    jazzy3 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you! I will check out the video and have to try the sitting/reward next time we go on a walk.
     
  4. Ian246

    Ian246 PetForums Senior

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    In addition to JoanneF's suggestion, might I suggest you try to 'train' your visitors? (And I mean that in the nicest way!) Your pup will continue to jump up at people as long as he gets something out of it. If they interact with him in any way (and often people hug dogs that jump up, stroke them or fuss them somehow) he's getting a reward. Before they enter the house explain you're trying to teach the dog better manners and ask them to ignore him completely (then watch how difficult people find that!) Ask them, if he jumps up at them, to ignore him, fold their arms (that will also make it difficult for him to mouth their hands which is something you'd do well to bring a stop to), turn away and make no sound (definitely don't say 'no' or anything as, again, that may just give him the attention he wants.) Like all things it may take time but the aim is that he realises that jumping up gets him nothing - if your visitors will collude with you it will be considerably easier.
     
    Bugsys grandma and Torin. like this.
  5. jazzy3

    jazzy3 PetForums Newbie

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    I completely agree. It has to be consistent.
     
  6. deecee

    deecee PetForums Junior

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    Firstly, don't worry about it too much as he will most likely grow out of it. You'll want to limit his chances to practice the behaviour, but by doing so, you don't want to ingrain other undesirable behaviours (e.g. you don't want people to become the forbidden fruit). If you're walking in an area with non-dog walkers, I'd pop him on the lead. If it's with other dog walkers, I wouldn't bother.

    Secondly, you need to walk him on lead around people much more. This will speed up the time it takes for people to become less interesting.

    Thirdly, you need to start working on reducing his excitement levels generally. If he's at a level 6 when you leave the house, he'll more easily hit a 10 when he sees someone. Start with sitting and waiting at thresholds, then work on walking by your side. If you can get to that point, where he isn't permanently distracted, he'll be much easier to manage.

    Finally, alternative behaviours to help manage the situation. Sits can work, but I prefer behaviours that encourage the dog to pass the person and keep moving. Heels with treats whilst walking past; a game of chase etc.

    With guests in the house, this is easier to solve as you have more control. The guest must not give any attention to the dog (not even a sneaky look) until the dog has lost interest. If the dog puts his paws on the guest, you need to block; preferably without physical contact; body language/positioning is usually enough. If the dog doesn't respond (possible with super excited dogs), calmly lead him away by the collar and put him in another room for 30s. Let him out; if he puts his paws on the guest, lead him away again. You're aiming to get to the point where he chooses to give the guest space rather than you having to move him. It's also worth training him to go to place (usually bed) as this gives you the option to send him away instead of leading him away.

    Lastly, if your dog behaves erratically more generally, don't rule out food as the cause. Some dogs can eat anything, others have noticeable changes in behaviour after finding a more suitable food.
     
  7. jazzy3

    jazzy3 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you!!
     
  8. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    The most damned and damning words in dog training; ‘he’ll most likely grow out of it’.

    He’ll most likely not grow out of anything that is an unwanted behaviour. Practise will reinforce it and he’ll just get bigger, stronger, more determined and more likely to continue.

    Address any unwanted, antisocial behaviour as soon as it arises.
     
  9. deecee

    deecee PetForums Junior

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    Nonsense. If what you are saying were true, all dogs would be running round like crazy little puppies. Young dogs exhibit lots of undesirable behaviours that reduce with age (like jumping on people outside). That's not to say you shouldn't manage/train, merely that things do get much easier. Too many people credit their dog's improved behaviour to their own training, when much will be down to the dog's own maturation.
     
  10. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    You have a first!

    In the 5 years I have been posting on here nobody has been unmannerly enough to use the word ‘nonsense’ in this context.

    I hope that in 50 years time, when you look back over your experience with hundreds of dogs and their owners ( as I do) you will be able to be a little more flexible in your opinions.
     
  11. deecee

    deecee PetForums Junior

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    I put it to you that perhaps the person that says "the most damned and damming words in dog training" is the one whose views are inflexible and words unmannerly, especially when referencing a message of reassurance in the first phrase of a lengthy post, without addressing any of the other points. They're also likely of strong enough constitution as to be unaffected by the word nonsense in rebuttal.

    Aside from the word nonsense, was there anything specific you'd like to address? I don't believe I suggested anything particularly controversial but am happy to discuss further if you believe so.
     
  12. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    No, thank you.
     
  13. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Administrator
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    I think this thread has reached a conclusion. The OP has had some good advice to take from it but dismissing members' posts as 'nonsense' is not helpful to anybody.
    :Locktopic
     
    Bugsys grandma and Linda Weasel like this.
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