Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Is your cat peeing or pooing in the house? This is the HOUSE SOILING thread!

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by Ceiling Kitty, Jul 7, 2014.


  1. Ragdollgirl123

    Ragdollgirl123 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2018
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi all, just come for some advice and wondered if anyone could help??

    My cat is just about to turn 2 and has recently started to use the floor as a toilet for her number 2s. It is only in the area where our trays are that she decided she doesn’t want to use the trays. During the day when we work and they are locked in our kitchen/living room area, she will happily use all of the trays. They are the same trays and we just move them from room to room from day to night.

    Recently she’s started going on the floor and will go out of her way to do it on the floor. She will walk past all the trays and then do it in a corner but just on random spots. It’s not just one spot she’s doing it on.

    She was the runt of her litter and has always done softer/runnier number 2s. But since this new habit has started they have definitely become wetter despite no change to her diet or any environmental issues or changes at home(she’s had a brother and sister for over a year and all three get along) so I’m really stumped as to why she’s started the habit/why they are wetter.

    Her appetite has not changed and in regards to her mood she’s still playing and being her regular self.

    We have 4 litter trays and have removed hoods because we found that the cats didn’t really like the hood.

    I am almost thinking she’s starting to trick me because I heard her on the litter and digging but when I went to pick it up, she’d gone on the carpet!

    She is using the trays for wees. It is just poop!

    Does anyone have any tips for me? As mad it sounds, I have tried to have a chat with her and ask her not to do it on the floor but surprisingly she doesn’t really understand me and looks at me like I’m mad!
     
  2. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    24,418
    Likes Received:
    21,303
    Hello @Ragdollgirl123 and welcome :)

    There is a direct connection between the runny poos and your cat avoiding the litter tray. It can be due to the cat's natural instinct not to want to contaminate their litter trays with diarrhoea, and/or the cat being in discomfort in her bowel from the runny poos and hence making a negative association between the litter tray and defecation. She will therefore avoid the tray and poo nearby, believing it will be more comfortable for her.

    To resolve the problem will mean identifying the cause of the soft or runny poos. It is not normal for cats to have soft or runny poos and is either diet-related (allergy or food intolerance) or caused by a bowel infection or parasite.

    Has she been treated for worms since the runny poos started?

    What do you feed her?

    What make of litter do you use?
     
  3. JulieAD

    JulieAD PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    18
    So update on the Tasha situation: after I got the second tray upstairs, she went back to using the first tray as normal for a while and occasionally peed in the 2nd. But last Sunday she decided to poo in the corner of the room where tray 1 is (not the same corner as previously). I thought it might be because she had peed in both 1 and 2 while I was out and the next day she went back to using tray 1 as before. Then Tuesday morning she pooed in the corner while I was scooping pee from tray 1, so I put some of that in tray 2 to encourage her to use that. Wednesday morning, same thing but this time I moved tray 2 down to what I am now calling Poo(h) Corner. She made a lot of noise about it but did then use it a couple of times for both kinds of toilet (she now appears to be ignoring tray 1). Until this morning when she squeezed herself down the side of tray 2 just so she could poo on the floor instead!

    Both trays are the same kind, CatIt covered litters, and I'm using World's Best litter in both. Before I moved tray 2 there was a dining room chair in Poo Corner with a bit of a gap to the wall and she would poo behind that. Is it likely to be worth trying with the lid off tray 2?

    I have been trying to wean her onto better quality cat food since last Monday as well as I thought things were back to normal (Naturo wet food and Thrive dry). Could this also be contributing? Her poo seems pretty normal, not dry and hard or very soft and she has been eating normally while I've been gradually changing ratios. She wasn't very keen on eating this morning when I tried her on just the Naturo but that may have been because the room was pretty smelly still - she ate a mix of Naturo/Felix again happily enough in a different room when she wouldn't go for it in the room with the trays.

    Gah. Any advice would be more than welcome please, I'm getting fairly stressed about the whole thing because I am trying hard to be a good cat person and keep Tasha healthy and happy and clearly something isn't right.
     
  4. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    24,418
    Likes Received:
    21,303
    Hi @JulieAD, sorry to hear there are still problems with Tasha soiling. Thank you for the update.

    I would definitely try both trays with the lids off. Some cats are much happier with open trays, especially for pooing in.

    Good you are providing Worlds Best litter; I think it's unlikely therefore to be the litter that is upsetting her. What depth do you put in the trays? I find about 4 cms depth is about right.

    I am wondering if the change in diet could be, as you say, contributing to her soiling again. You mention her stools are not hard and dry or "very soft" but if they are softish at all, then it could cause a problem from her POV. Cat stools do need to be quite firm in order to put the right amount of pressure in the rectum to make the anal gland sacs empty during defecation.

    Resolving these kind of soiling problems can be pretty frustrating, as so much is by trial and error, trying to guess what is upsetting the cat. I understand it is stressful, but please do your utmost to stay as calm as possible as Tasha will without doubt sense your stress and it will make her anxious and possibly make the soiling worse.

    Please believe me you are very much being a "good cat person" in trying your best to find out what is wrong and put it right for Tasha. :)

    We will get there in the end, between us; just got to keep on trying things out. :)

    Let us know how things go with the open trays, OK :)
     
  5. JulieAD

    JulieAD PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    18
    She used the uncovered tray in Poo Corner! I'm not prepared to let off fireworks yet, but hope is kindled :) (I was so excited by that and that Tasha had actually covered it I forgot to check how hard it was though.) I do use about 4-5cm depth in both the trays, so I think that is okay.

    I am persevering with the diet change, though a little more slowly - I think I will keep mixing in a bit of the junk-food Felix for the next few days and see how we go.

    Thank you for the reassurance, I was feeling a tad overwhelmed the other day. I think Tasha lulled me into a false sense of security by being so good at litter tray use for the first couple of months!
     
    SuboJvR and chillminx like this.
  6. Baby blossom

    Baby blossom PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2018
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello all, new to this forum but I am DESPERATE and looking for advice! We have a male Russian Blue cat, he is about eleven months old and very energetic. He recently (around one month ago) started marking periodically in our bedroom but we managed to stop this behaviour (we had locked him out of our bedroom after having a baby because he likes to lay on our faces and we were concerned he might accidentally suffocate her, but she is older now) by letting him back into our bedroom. However, this morning before leaving the house I noticed he peed - without marking all over our front entry way. Any idea why this might happen? And advice on what to do? I love my cat dearly and refuse to even consider re-homing him.
     
  7. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    24,418
    Likes Received:
    21,303
    Hello @Baby blossom and welcome :)

    Is your cat neutered? If not book him in straight away to be done. Scent marking with urine is more common in an un-neutered cat, though neutered cats may do it too.

    Inappropriate urination should always be investigated by the vet. Your cat might have FLUTD (Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease) either with a UTI (urinary tract infection) or Feline cystitis (without an infection). Whatever the case he would need treatment.

    Cats with FLUTD may avoid using the litter trays because they associate the litter trays with pain. Instead they pee on soft surfaces like beds as a way of comforting themselves.

    How many litter trays do you provide for your cat ?

    If the vet finds no physical cause for your cat soiling then, as you suspect, your cat is probably scent marking. This is possibly because he was shut out of your bedroom. It made him feel anxious and insecure, he saw the baby as a rival for your attention, hence he marked with his scent to claim your bedroom as his territory, and you as his major resource.

    Another possibility is that he is scent marking in response to a cat (or cats) that comes into your garden and sprays, or sprays in the entry way. .Scent marking is not always done by spraying urine, squatting and peeing can be used when scent marking too.

    If your cat is neutered he could be responding to an un-neutered tom cat who is spraying around the outside of your house.

    Do you have a microchipped cat flap so no strange cats can get into your house?

    Are there a number of cats in your neighbourhood? There could be squabbles over territory and resources if there are too many cats living in one area.

    You may need to shut your cat out of your bedroom until you have resolved the soiling issue.

    The thing I have found most helpful in reducing indoor scent-marking is a supplement called Zylkene. It comes in capsules which you open and add the powder to food. I give a course for a month at a time for effect.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Zylkene-75...1626879&sr=8-2&keywords=zylkene+75mg+for+cats

    Also, a cat with any kind of urinary problem needs a wet food diet, no dry food. The wet food diet makes the urine more dilute, more comfortable to pass, and less likelihood of cystitis developing.

    Clean up any urine stains with an enzyme stain remover. I use Bio Tex Stain Remover, but a solution of bio laundry liquid works too. (though Bio Tex is less soapy!) It is essential to remove all traces of the urine smell or your cat may keep going back to the same spots again and again, to mark. Same applies to the entry way, give it a good clean to get rid of the smell.
     
  8. Attackonliv

    Attackonliv PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2018
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    8
    Hi guys!

    Thought it might be helpful to update on what worked and what didn't. We ended up using two large litter trays, and we put one in the living room where she was pooping a lot. After being spayed, she was still peeing in the bedroom also. We bought some Feliway Classic for the bedroom, and she immediately stopped peeing in there. After a few days, she began using the living room litter tray. We also got a moving water fountain which she preferred to the bowl, and she began drinking far more, which stopped the constipation overflow issue. We also kept her on two wet food pouches a day, with a little bit of dry food for a snack if she wants.

    Hope this helps anyone looking for advice that works :D
     
    Gallifreyangirl likes this.
  9. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    24,418
    Likes Received:
    21,303
    Hi @Attackonliv - thank you for the update :)

    I'm very pleased to hear you've discovered what works for your cat, and the soiling problem is now solved. Well done! :)
     
  10. Emskielou

    Emskielou PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hiya. My cat has been soiling just in front of her litter tray on and off for a couple of years now. Ive had enough and I’ve tried everything.. more trays, relocation or trays, different litter, closed tray open tray, feliway, cleaning them more regularly....even got a cat flap that she won’t use. She hates going outside in winter too which I don’t think helps. I really can’t afford a cat behaviourist and at her annual very check ups they never pick anything up that’s wrong with her. And surly if she was poorly there would be other signs of this? Any suggestions?
     
  11. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    24,418
    Likes Received:
    21,303
    Hello @Emskielou and welcome :)

    Before I reply to your question, could I ask for a little more information about your cat please?

    e.g.

    How old is she?

    Is she spayed?

    Is she your only pet?

    What foods do you feed her?

    With house soiling problems it is often a matter of trying different things to see what helps. I appreciate you have already tried a lot of things and nothing has worked so far, but I hope t may be able suggest something to try, once I have read your next reply. :)
     
  12. Emskielou

    Emskielou PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Hiya.

    Thank you.

    She is about 5 and spayed. We have another female cat, similar age, also spayed. Florence the one that’s messing I think is a very sensitive soul so I don’t think that helps. She also loves attention, she’s a proper lap cat when she gets the chance. She hides if we have children round or there’s more noise that usual and she hasn’t ever had the courage to go out the front of the house or jump over our stair gates.
    We don’t have any other pets, just a toddler! I feed them only dry food - Iams vitality. They used to also have wet food but they can be sick a lot after they eat so biscuits seemed to be slightly better. I also use wooden littler pellets, have also tried the standard litter too.
    Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thank you
     
  13. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    24,418
    Likes Received:
    21,303
    Hi, @Emskielou and thank you for your reply. :)

    There are potentially several reasons why Florence could be soiling the floor: One is that she she may not be getting on well with your other cat. As you say the soiling started about 2 years ago, this would have been when Florence was about 3 yrs old and this is the time when cats are socially fully mature. And the time when they can become most protective of their resources. (litter trays are a major resource for cats, second only to food and water). The signs that the two cats don't get along may only be subtle, not easily noticed by humans.

    As you have 2 cats you need at least 3 litter trays. Three is the absolute minimum. But as you are having this soiling issue I would provide 4 trays. Generally open trays are best, so the cats can see around themselves when they are toileting and feel safer. Spread the trays around the home and not close together.

    Cats do not usually like pooing in a tray that has pee in, or peeing in a tray that has poo in. It doesn't matter if it's their own poo or their feline housemate's poo. This is why for 2 cats you need a lot of trays. Put the litter in to a depth of around 5 cm so there is room for the cats to dig.

    We use wood pellet litter at the shelter because it is incredibly cheap. The trays are emptied out and washed twice a day and refilled with new litter. This twice a day emptying out is essential because with wood pellets it is impossible to see which parts are soiled with urine and which parts are clean.

    But some cats do not like wood pellets and soiling can be the effect of this. As Florence is soiling I'd provide a litter known to be well-liked by cats. Worlds Best Original acts like a magnet for most cats and I tend to recommend it when there are soiling issues. It is a clumping litter made from cereal.

    Another well-liked litter is Cats Best Oko Plus, also a clumping litter, but a little cheaper than Worlds Best.

    Both can be bought in bulk more cheaply from Zooplus (though Pets at Home sells smaller bags).

    https://www.zooplus.co.uk/shop/cats/cat_litter/worlds_best_cat_litter/136586

    https://www.zooplus.co.uk/shop/cats/cat_litter/cats_best/14001

    So, either of these 2 litters, and open trays filled to a depth of 5 cms, and spread around the areas the cats use.

    I meant to check with you that the soiling is urine and not poo? If it is urine then have you had a urinalysis done for Florence by the vet at the time she is soiling? It is possible she may have an intermittent urine infection (UTI). But equally possible she may have no urine infection but instead have feline cystitis (which can be stress related).

    Generally speaking when a cat soils right beside the tray though it is because they don't like the type of litter or the type of tray.

    A cat with any kind of urine problem ( such as soiling) should always be fed a wet food diet, high in meat protein. Never fed dry food. Dry food is high in carbs which cats can't process healthily and it also makes the urine too alkaline and more likely to harbour bacteria.

    Cats are designed to eat their food with the moisture within it (their prey animals). They are not good drinkers of water, and as a result a cat on a dry food diet may suffer from chronic low level dehydration. This is no good for their bladder as it can encourage crystals to form in the bladder, irritating it.

    Florence needs more volume of urine so the urine is more dilute and she is encouraged to pee more often. This will keep her bladder and urinary tract comfortable.

    So a high meat protein grain free wet food diet is best for her. If she used to vomit on wet food then all wet food is not to blame, just certain foods. She may need feeding smaller meals frequently (e.g. 4 meals a day). Avoid foods such as Felix and Whiskas which contain veg protein extract and are low in meat protein, as well as grains and added sugars, all of which are unhealthy for cats.

    Some foods to consider are : Country Hunter, Natures Menu, HiLife Chicken Dinner, Wellness Core Tender Cuts, Meowing Heads, Lily's Kitchen, Wainwrights tins of chicken or duck.

    Or for better value for money buy from places such as Zooplus. They have a good policy of refunding for any unopened tins or packets of food your cat won't eat, so you are safe to buy things for Florence to try.

    Always introduce new foods slowly, a bit a time along side the cat's regular food, to save upset tummies or vomiting.

    Here's a link to an excellent pinned thread listing all the good quality wet foods from Zooplus. Choose foods that are 10% carbs or lower, for your cats' health:

    https://www.petforums.co.uk/threads...-just-the-good-stuff-work-in-progress.440844/


    Please let us know how things go after you've tried the above suggestions. I am hopeful they will help, but if there is still a problem I can help further. :)
     
  14. Emskielou

    Emskielou PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2019
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Hi. Thank you so much for your advice. I will definitely take it all on board and give it a go.

    In regards to the relationship between my cats - they have always appeared to get on as when they were smaller they used to curl up together and the older one would mother Florence a bit. However they sometimes do fight, but it always appears to me as play fighting. If my other cat is the cause how would I find out as if that’s the case then I guess I would need to think about rehoming one?

    Florence never wees on the floor, it’s only poo she does on the floor in front of her tray. My other cat usually goes outside. And I always keep the litter clean and poo free. But will definitely try more trays and different litter etc. Anything to try resolve it. Would you suggest litter trays upstairs too? And do you think it’s something I could eventually phase out as in an ideal world I don’t really want that many if any in the house especially with a curious toddler!
    Thanks very much for all your help
    Emma
     
  15. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    24,418
    Likes Received:
    21,303

    Hi Emma,

    While it wouldn't be a good idea to phase out all the indoor litter trays especially as Florence has this tendency to soil, it may be possible eventually to reduce the number of trays to 2 (if your other cat always goes outside to toilet)

    I am sorry I didn't realise the soiling is poo on the floor, not urine. Some of the advice I gave you in my previous reply still applies e.g. some cats do not like pooing in a tray that has pee in it.

    And the fact is wood pellet litter is difficult to keep fresh, because it's hard to tell which bits are contaminated by urine. So unless you empty out the whole tray every time the trays are used by Florence or your other cat, then I really recommend you switch to one of the granular clumping litters I recommended, as it will be much easier to scoop and keep clean.

    I would also put at least one tray upstairs if that is where Florence is spending most of her time at present. As far as keeping your toddler away from the tray you may need to fit a baby gate in the doorway of the room where the tray is kept. However as Florence doesn't like jumping over the stair gate she may be reluctant to climb over a baby gate in a doorway. So you could fit a cat flap to the room door and keep the door closed all the time. And train Florence to use the cat flap of the room to get to her tray.

    However, one needs to make it as easy and straightforward for Florence to use her trays. I am a bit worried that if she has to learn to jump a baby gate or go through a cat flap to reach her trays it might put her off. But it is worth a try, and perhaps training her with rewards. If a new tray remains unused you can take her poo off the floor and place it in the new tray. You do not need to show her, she will find it by the scent of it. (as long as it is in a room she goes into of course).

    With regard to Florence's poos, are they firm and formed, not soft or loose? if they are soft or loose that may be the reason she avoids the tray sometimes. Also if they are very hard and she has to strain to pass them (constipation) then she may also avoid the tray. This is because the cat associates the litter tray with discomfort.

    Another possibility is Florence is scent marking (known as "middening" when poo is used for the purpose of marking). Florence would be doing this as a message to your other cat to tell her the tray is hers (Florence's). You mentioned that your other cat "usually" goes outdoors to toilet but if there are times when she does use the indoor trays then it's possible that is what Florence objects to as she sees the trays as being her resource. The solution if so, can be to add more trays (i.e the 3 or 4 I mentioned before).

    Diet is also important. The risk with dry food is that she may not be getting enough fluids and her stools may be dry and hard to evacuate. Or a dry food diet being very high in calories may be too rich for her and is making her stools soft perhaps.

    Do you measure out the exact amount of dry food per cat according to the instructions on the packet, and serve a portion of it for each meal several times a day? Or do you put down a bowlful for the day and let them snack on it all day? If the latter, then it is likely she is getting too rich a diet, and this may well be affecting her stool consistency.

    A healthier diet of low carb, grain free, high meat protein wet food may help Florence feel more comfortable in her tummy and intestine. Worth a try anyway. :)

    Re: the 'play fighting' - it is hard to me to tell if it is play-fighting unless I can see an example of it on video. Is there any hissing, growling, yowling or shrieking ? Does any fur fly? Is it always your other cat who starts the 'fight'? Do the cats have plenty of places to go to indoors to get away from each other if they choose?
     
    #375 chillminx, Feb 1, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2019
  16. Helena91

    Helena91 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2019
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    16
    I recently bought a kitten from an online advert. When I got her home I saw she was in a bad state, runny eyes and nose, fleas jumping off her, bloated belly. She didn't look 8 weeks either. I took her straight to the vet who agreed she probably was too young to leave her mother and treated her for fleas and worms. It's about 1 ½ weeks since then now and shes SO much better, however she's now having litter box issues. We have had to litter train her and she uses the box about 70% of the time now, but the rest of the time she will pee or poop elsewhere. I will watch her like a hawk, and I see her shuffling her butt and lifting her tail, I will put her in the tray and sometimes she will go, other times she will jump out and go back to the sofa or behind the tv unit and try again. I can move her back over and over till she is squealing and biting me when I put her in the tray and she will just not use it.... Is this normal? What should I do?
     
  17. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    24,418
    Likes Received:
    21,303
    Hello @Helena91 and welcome :)

    It is always best when litter training a young kitten to keep them contained in one room, with their food, water, litter trays, and a cosy bed off the floor. Not a bathroom or utility room, but something big enough for you to spend plenty of time with her through the day, doing normal everyday things, such as eating meals, watching TV etc.

    if possible choose a room that has hard floors as it will be easier to clean if kitty has toilet accidents. But a kitchen is not always an ideal place as there are too many places for a small kitten to get stuck under, e.g washing machine, fridge etc.

    Provide kitty with 2 open litter boxes, and fill them with a non clumping fine grain litter. It is important at her young age the litter is non clumping in case she licks litter off her paws or coat - as clumping clay litter could cause an intestinal blockage. However, once kitty is over 8 weeks old you can use a good cereal based clumping litter for her such as Worlds Best Original.

    However using a non clumping litter means you will need to change all the litter frequently, i.e. empty out the whole tray, wash it and refill with new litter. This is because it is difficult with non clumping litter to scoop all the soiled bits and often the clean stuff in the litter box gets contaminated too (which may put kitty off using it).

    Kitty is squealing and biting you when you put her in the litter box so please stop doing it, because it is counterproductive. Causing her stress and making her associate the litter tray with fear means you risk never training her properly to use a litter box.

    Instead when you have the two litter boxes in place (not close together, and well away from her food) provide some good litter and confine kitty to one room. If she pees on the floor say nothing to her (do not show ANY disapproval to her) just mop up the pee with a piece of kitchen paper and put the paper in the nearest litter tray. Leave the soiled paper there for an hour or so, kitty will notice it, she has a terrific sense of smell, you do not need to point it out to her.

    You will need to be patient and give her plenty of time to learn. It is evident from what you say she has been taken from her mother far too young, and this is likely to have knock-on effects on her behaviour and socialisation. You need to step into the role of substitute "mum" and gently teach her the things she needs to know.

    She will need a wet food diet, no dry food. Dry food is unsuitable for a kitten (or cat) who has any kind of bladder issue, such as soiling. She needs plenty of fluids in her diet and the way to ensure a high fluid intake is to feed her a wet food diet.

    She will need 4 or 5 meals a day of wet food at her age. If you're out in the day time, feed her before you go out and then leave her a couple of meals in a timed autofeeder, then feed her again when you get home, and again at bedtime. This is the autofeeder I use for my kittens and cats and after 25 years of use it is still going strong, so a good investment.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Cat-Mate-C...2891&sr=8-2&keywords=cat+mate+c20+auto+feeder

    Keep her confined to one room until she has the hang of using the litter boxes every time she toilets. This may take a week, or it may take several weeks, don't worry, you will get there. :)

    Please let me know how things go, when you have implemented the changes I've recommended. :)
     
    #377 chillminx, Feb 3, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2019
  18. Helena91

    Helena91 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2019
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    16
    Thanks for the advice, we will try and let you know how it goes :)
     

    Attached Files:

    chillminx likes this.
  19. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    24,418
    Likes Received:
    21,303
    Awww, bless the little poppet, she is so cute! xx She does look very young as you said, about 6 wks old in that photo - are her eyes still blue? They start to change around the age of 6 weeks old.
     
  20. Helena91

    Helena91 PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2019
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    16
    That was a picture I took of her on the first night we had her, she only had a skinny little stump for a tail too! We think she's around 8 weeks now, her eyes are still blue though, I think they are changing to yellowish green, and she has a proper tail now :) She's a grey tabby named Willow by the way.
     

    Attached Files:

    chillminx likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice