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Is this a possibility??

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Alexandra1342, Mar 23, 2020.


  1. Alexandra1342

    Alexandra1342 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi, would love some advise as I’m looking to buy a Doberman KC registered she’s she’s 8 months old.. very timid her back legs was shaking and not responding much to me calling her name.. her owner said she brought the dog as she wanted to train her to be a security guard dog and was selling as the dog wouldn’t be up to the standard of a security dog.. at first I agreed and took that for gospel.. as she worked as a security dog handler! Then went on to tell me how her ex boyfriend used to beat her other dogs... I asked if this dog had also been beaten! She told me not and he never met this dog... it just didn’t ring true to me.. so my question is firstly.. can a dog just be timid ?? (I don’t believe they are?) can I take this dog a build her confidence up and train her well? Because I am looking for a dog I can train to be a good dog... she was a beautiful dog with a lot of potential I just feel I’m not getting the real story on her back ground! Advise needed as iv only had dogs from puppy’s in the past..
     
  2. Ian246

    Ian246 PetForums Senior

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    I guess it depends how you define ‘timid’. Certainly, dogs are different in personality - certain breeds are more highly strung than others, generally (there are always exceptions, of course) - and if a dog has not been properly socialised it is liable to be anxious and nervous. Certainly if it’s been frequently punished it will be frightened. By the nature of dogs it may not be possible to completely get over a lot of bad treatment. On the other hand, with the right care and a good deal of effort and careful handling, there is a good chance she may become a good dog, as in a good pet; it’s just that you may find she reacts to certain things or situations - for example, if she’s been beaten by a man frequently, she may be (I reiterate ‘may’ be) nervous of men generally.
    You are taking a risk, that’s for sure, but what future does this poor dog have otherwise? (Sorry, that sounds like I’m emotionally convincing you to take the dog - I don’t mean to do that at all.) I would not pay much for her - also, is she chipped? Can you confirm that this person is the legal owner?
    I’m not sure if that does answer your question, but if you have more, please ask.
     
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  3. Alexandra1342

    Alexandra1342 PetForums Newbie

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    Your absolutely right concerning her future. I do feel I want to take her on and simply give her a good home! She has papers and the owner seemed to be a nice person her self.. I guess Iv never know a dog to be so quiet especially of this breed iv only known them confident or even more so hyper.. but never quiet! Thank you for your reply..
     
  4. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    I think a dog can just have a timid , shy personality. My female dachshund is very shy until she's weighed someone up, she's petrified of children , footballs, bouncy bigger dogs ...... etc,etc. But I know her history and breeder well. She was given to me at 4 yrs old by her breeder, been treated kindly all her life but hadn't made the grade for showing due to her shyness. It's an aspect of her personality that has to be managed, I'm quite protective of her but she is doing better now we have another more confident dog, this has really helped her develop more confidence herself.
    Reena just wants a quiet life with no scary moments, then she's happy.
    If you feel you can offer this dog a quiet, calm environment then do take her but be prepared for the fact that anything like agility or group meetings/classes may not be suitable for her. It can be quite restrictive having a nervous dog.
     
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  5. amplecrumlin

    amplecrumlin PetForums Junior

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    There is something called the Volhard puppy temperament test, the protocol is that it must be carried out at exactly 7 weeks old, by someone who the puppy has never met before.
    The idea is to have some objective measure of the pup's temperament, to help in matching the pup to the most appropriate new home.
    It definitely allows for some pups being more outgoing than others. I know someone who has had it done on a few litters and been impressed by how reliable it is, they keep in contact with all their pups and the confident ones have grown into confident adults, the shy pups have remained reticent as adults.
    So in short, yes this bitch may be quiet by nature or by nurture, or a combination.
     
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  6. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    Only a guess, but if this dog was original bought to be a ‘security’ dog (and this covers everything from dogs properly trained to work with a handler, to those that will be left loose in a premises) then she has probably had little or no normal socialising, as this would probably be considered counter-productive.

    If this should be the case then she can hopefully be improved a lot but I think you’d have to accept that she will never be a normal, sociable, easygoing dog and will always need you to manage what she’s exposed to. She may never be a ‘family’ dog.

    And well done you, I really hope that if your circumstances allow, you can give her a forever home.
     
    Calvine likes this.
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