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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

First post and great looking website.

We have two tabbies: a brother and sister around 4.5 years old, both neutered.

The male has had a blockage about 18 months ago that would have killed him if we hadn't got him to the vet in time. His urinary tract was blocked and the vet said although they don't know the exact cause it was probably a combination of:

1. Being overweight (he needs to lose a kilo although he is a big cat, i.e. big frame)
2. Crystals
3. Stress
4. Too much dry food
5. Being an indoor cat (he won't go out as out the back of our house there are loads of other cats and dogs)

Although there were crystals present they said the blockage was more of a spasm and again reiterated that they couldn't pinpoint the cause. He's not insured, by the way, and it cost about £650 in vet bills.

We stopped dry food and tried to keep the litter tray clean as he is really picky about this and if it is not cleaned out often he gets stressed.

It was a case of so far, so good although we have been slack in exercising him and control his food intake (i.e. he hasn't lost any weight). He was symptom free until last month when he urinated blood. We took him to the vet and he said it was cystitis and gave him a shot and some tablets and he's been fine.

He said prescription pet food is an option but also encouraged us to get him to lose weight. Sorry for the long post but here are my questions:

1. Why is all food made for urinary problems paradoxically dry if this is known to exacerbate the condition?

2. How does Purina stand up to the prescription stuff? They do one especially for good urinary health which we have switched him to (from Whiskas pouches). Him and his sister love it so much they won't actually eat the Whiskas any more. Is this good pet food? I don't want to be feeding him anything that could put him at risk. It seems pretty good in that it has fish oil in (DHA) but it also has grains in. I thought all carbs were bad for a cat.

Many thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow, I'm working right now so haven't read the whole article but it looks very relevant! Thank you!

I always thought there was something unnatural about giving a cat dry food.

What is the best wet food in the UK?

By the way, this photo made me a little sad:

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What raw meats have you tried ? Might be worth trying something else.
Just chicken and fish.

They're quite fussy eaters. We've given them some top quality meats (cooked) from our dinners before and they never seem that interested but give them a tin of tuna or one of those chicken and liver sticks and they go mental! I sometimes wonder whether they're the feline equivalent of those kids on Jamie's School Dinners who only eat chicken nugget and chips. :D

Thanks for that link at the top. I need to read up on this more but I'm pleased I've found out sooner rather than later that these so-called dry health foods are no good. It looks like high water wet food diet is the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Since cats generally don't cook their food in the wild, why not try feeding them some raw meat instead of your left overs.
I've tried, they just won't eat it. It's unnatural as you say but I think they've got so used to manufactured pet food we won't be able to change their eating habits overnight.

Thanks again for all the advice, I'm definitely the wiser for it.
 
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