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Is my cat pregnant

Discussion in 'Cat Breeding' started by Djay, Feb 4, 2020.


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Is she pregnant or not?

  1. Yes!

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  2. No definitly not!

    0 vote(s)
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  3. no!

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  1. Djay

    Djay PetForums Newbie

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  2. gskinner123

    gskinner123 PetForums VIP

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    Out of curiosity, what is the reason for mating these two breeds together?
     
  3. Rufus15

    Rufus15 PetForums VIP

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    An F3 Savannah and a Maine Coon is an awful mix. Neuter them both
     
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  4. Djay

    Djay PetForums Newbie

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    Hello,
    We bred them because they are both big also we like that the ears are big and that they both very smart. But the question was if she is pregnant. the main reason is for the size of them both! And no im definitely not going to neuter them :/ its not really for proffesional breeding just for the family :)
     
    #4 Djay, Feb 4, 2020
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2020
  5. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    No-one here can tell you if she's pregnant, if she' s been mated the chances are that she is.
     
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  6. Djay

    Djay PetForums Newbie

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    Oh i thought you can see because if the pictures
     
  7. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Hi @Djay welcome to PF
    No, no one can tell you from pictures if your cat is pregnant, though if you deliberately bred her, odds are she indeed is. Your vet could tell you for sure.

    Size and ear shape are not the best reasons to breed. Temperament and health are more important concerns.

    It's generally not recommended to mix breeds like this for so many reasons. Not the least of which is health issues. I'm pretty sure Maine Coons have certain congenital conditions that you would need to test for to make sure to not pass on to the offspring. Same for a Savannah.
    I would also imagine there would be some serious competing drives in a cat bred mainly to be a pet and a cat, well, not...

    I hope you get a chance to read through the forums, there are a lot of knowledgeable folks who can not only help you with this litter, but better explain to you how to breed more responsibly if you choose to continue to do so in the future.
     
  8. Djay

    Djay PetForums Newbie

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    Hi,

    Thanks for you response. The mainecoon isnt a pedigree(English isnt my main language) so diseases would not matter (this female doesnt have problems at all) and the savannah only is a f3 so i dont think it matters too much either. I will look around on the forum for more information, thanks!
     
  9. spotty cats

    spotty cats PetForums VIP

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    Moggies used in legitimate outcross programs are still health tested and HCM scanned.
     
  10. Rufus15

    Rufus15 PetForums VIP

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    Diseases would matter more in a Maine Coon that's not a pedigree as it's more likely they will have the health defects present in the breed. The information you will find on the forum will be to neuter your cats. No one on here is a professional breeder either.
     
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  11. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    When it comes to genetic predisposition to certain conditions, pedigree won't matter. It's the breed that carries these conditions, pedigree or not.
    Conscientious breeders screen the cats they breed to avoid issues as much as possible.
    For example Maine Coons (and moggies) can suffer with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, HCM. This condition can take many years to actually manifest, so breeders have their cats examined with an electrocardiogram to examine the heart. That way they can avoid breeding cats who have the condition even if it hasn't shown up yet.
    There is also a DNA test for the genes that cause HCM. Responsible breeders want to eradicate HCM entirely in the breed. Avoiding the genes that cause it is a great step in that direction.

    With bigger cats I would also worry about joint issues. A quick x-ray can examine the bone structure and see if the cat is likely to pass on poor structure that leads to joint issues.

    So yes, health definitely matters, and these are just a few potential issues to consider. Maine Coon breeders and Savannah breeders can better tell you what tests your breeding cats should have.

    No good to breed big cats with cute ears if they're going to drop dead of heart disease or struggle to walk right?
     
  12. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Oh please spay this cat now. Those poor kittens.
     
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  13. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    Only two HCM DNA tests, one for the Ragdoll and one - wait for it - for the Maine Coon. Being negative doesn't guarantee no HCM but greatly reduces the chances.

    I agree, not a good idea to breed these cats. I have no idea what a 'professional breeder' is but no-one here earns a living from breeding cats. And it doesn't always go well. Cats can need C-sections, usually out of hours so ££££, or $$$$ depending where you live. They can get mastitis, a few are bad mothers, some are so protective you have to be very careful handling the kittens when they are small. If you have small children how will the cope if, as is common, one or more kittens 'doesn't make it'? Or if they need hand feeding?
     
  14. Rufus15

    Rufus15 PetForums VIP

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    Just to correct this slightly, we don't have the same issues in big cats that are seen in big dogs because, although some cats are indeed bigger, there isn't the phenomenal size difference one sees in dogs.

    Luxating patella can be an issue though and is genetic, so there can be bone issues in the bigger breeds.

    Hip scans are very specific and need a specialist to carry them out and examine the results. Two excellent hipped parents can produce badly hipped and vice versa, so we're a long way off using hip scoring as definitive as one would in Retrievers, for example.

    However, in any cat, and certainly the bigger ones, bad conformity does lead to excess pressure on bones and joints, so I agree that poor structure, especially in such a polar opposite mating like this, is a serious issue
     
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  15. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Let’s hope not, for her sake and any kittens.
     
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  16. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    I don't remember mentioning dogs in my post?
    Structure is structure. Size is not the issue in things like patellar luxation or hip displasia, structure is.
    The reason I mentioned size is because the OP gave one of the reasons for breeding being size. Trying to go bigger and bigger without examining the underlying structure is not wise as I'm sure you'll agree.

    Hip scores are very specific in dogs also, also require a specialist to position the dog and read the results. And it's breed specific too.
    We well understand in dogs that hip displasia is a polygenetic trait and just because a dog has good hips doesn't mean they will produce offspring with good hips, it's a whole picture of generations of tested dogs and knowing the lines.

    But I'm not sure how 'correcting' my post is helpful to the OP or will encourage them to breed more responsibly?

    @Djay your cat would be much better off spayed, and at only 3 weeks in, it's not too late. She will be much happier spayed, and your male will make a much better pet neutered.
    Then you can read up, research, potentially get a mentor, and go about breeding the right way :)
     
  17. Rufus15

    Rufus15 PetForums VIP

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    If you care to re-read, I was actually largely agreeing with you.

    I mentioned dogs as I presumed that's where you were coming from, having little experience of cats by your own admissions.

    I agree that bigger and bigger is not better, and certainly in the Forest breeds a responsible breeder doesn't breed or sell for size.

    Hip dysplasia can present in cats even in clear lines, and can be made worse by breeding bigger and bigger cats. So, as we have all said, breeding these two large cats together for large kittens is an awful idea.

    I was posting for the benefit of others, not just the OP, seeing as this forum has many lurkers.
     
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  18. spotty cats

    spotty cats PetForums VIP

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    In many countries hip testing a MCO before breeding is just one of the standard tests, and one google also brings up as required for prospective owners researching, I wouldn't go to a breeder who didn't test.
    If the OP has a MCO or moggy they clearly aren't interested in health
     
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  19. moomoowawa

    moomoowawa PetForums Member

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    So you've decided to put the health of potentially a dozen cats at risk because you like big ears? Is that about the jist of this?
     
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  20. Calvine

    Calvine PetForums VIP

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    Has OP gone off radar?
     
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