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Is it time to euthanase?

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Bungle75, Jul 1, 2020.


  1. Bungle75

    Bungle75 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi.
    I'm looking for some advise please.
    I have a 15 year old dog. I brought him as a Bichon x Yorkie, but last vet visit I was told he is most likely a Maltese.
    He's never been very friendly but he's got so much worse, he will snap and snarl at anyone, baring his teeth and lunging. He's bitten me 3 times in the last week.
    He doesn't do much damage as he's lost a few teeth, but that's not the point.
    It's got to a stage i can't have children here as I can't risk it.
    He sometimes walks with a humped back which I think I'm right in thinking it might be pain? He shakes a lot too. He is on pain killers and anti inflammatory from the vet but not sure they are still working well.
    His breath stinks, the vet didn't want to put him out to check(due to his age) and because he's so nasty you can't get any where near his mouth or he will bite. He's only ever been able to have softer food because anything more has always caused him constipation (one of the reasons they said Maltese because apparently that's a trait with them)
    He's drinking much more now now, but I've not noticed extra weeing.
    He has lots of lumps on his body that the vet said are warts, look like brains that are about thumb nail size.
    The vet did lots of blood tests and put him on the medication and also said she thinks he might have a slow growing brain tumour and hopefully it was so slow growing age would get him before the tumor.
    What I'm trying to ask is does anyone think I should be thinking about putting him to sleep? I don't know if I'm just being selfish keeping him here. Please ask anything you want and I will answer. Please bare in mind I suffer awful mental health issues, so please try to be kind. Thank you x
     
  2. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Under what circumstances will he bite?
     
  3. Bungle75

    Bungle75 PetForums Newbie

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    He bites at everything. People he knows or doesn't know. When we walk out a door(like the living room, into the garden etc) he will chase and bite legs. When he's smoothed, picked up which I only do to bath him or put on the vet table. He hates being told what to do now, if I dare tell him to go out for a wee, or get off a bed he's like a tiger! Lunging and will really lock on if he can. The vet said his eye sight and hearing is fine. I'm worried it's the brain tumour. The only time he not nasty is when he's aslepp
     
  4. Olaf1

    Olaf1 PetForums Junior

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    You should consider taking advice from veterinarian certified in behaviour medicine.
    Identify the cause.
    Make the decision based on that.
     
  5. Bungle75

    Bungle75 PetForums Newbie

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    He was assessed by 2 dog behaviourists last year. After 6 months they said there was nothing more they could do. Nothing we tried worked. I even did this thing where I had to completely ignore him for 2 weeks, no eye contact, no touching nothing, broke my heart. Maybe I should try another one though, thank you
     
  6. Teddy-dog

    Teddy-dog PetForums VIP

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    sorry to say but they do not seem like good dog behaviourists... what was the reasoning for ignoring your dog for two weeks?

    your dog sounds like pain to me, whether that’s the brain tumour or something like arthritis or something else no one can tell. I would go back to a vet and discuss whether they can investigate for pain and what their opinion is.
     
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  7. Bungle75

    Bungle75 PetForums Newbie

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    I will try to find the email that they sent recapping it for me.
    Think it was a dominant thing. To be honest I couldn't do it all the time anyway, and 100% wouldn't consider it now he's like this anyway.
    I have a appointment in a week, just didn't know if to bring up putting to sleep or not, I didn't want them to think I didn't care.
    He actually does have arthritis, one of the reasons he's on pain killers and a joint supplement I put in his food
     
  8. Teddy-dog

    Teddy-dog PetForums VIP

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    Unfortunately the dominance theory has been debunked though some behaviourists and trainers do still follow it. If you do go to another behaviourist make sure you go with one who uses positive reinforcement methods, no dominance theory.

    I would definitely talk to the vet about his behaviour and see what they say. You can bring up PTS, the vet can only give you their opinion and not force anything. Our old Collie got grumbley About being touched in certain places when his arthritis got worse, the vets upped his dosage and he was ok after that. But it depends how bad the arthritis is as to whether it would help.
    The fact you’re taking him to the vet and talking about it on here shows you do care, I don’t think the vets will think anything like that at all.
     
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  9. Bungle75

    Bungle75 PetForums Newbie

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    Do you know I now hate the dominant thing, I used to watch ceaser(not sure on spelling) thought he was great, but soon come to realise that some of the things he done was so cruel and unnecessary. Will look into positive reinforcement training.

    Thank you for the reassurance about the vet, sometimes I over think and worry about people's opinions. I will write down everything I want to ask the vet before I go.
    I had to have a dog PTS last year and it still hurts now. She was lovely, so friendly, she was never like Bracken is.

    Thanks everyone for comments x
     
  10. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    Bless him he doesn't sound happy (not your fault). I was training a dog who was quite aggressive (not to everyone), but she also would fall asleep randomly. I got the owner to get her a proper check (bare in mind her siblings all died from meningitis) and it turned out she had degenerative brain disease which would only make her more aggressive over time. She was PTS about a month after her final diagnosis.
    Brain issues definitely can cause aggression, add this to being old and sore, and I'm not surprised he's biting. I definitely agree with writing everything down and having a chat with your vet. It is a kindness to PTS an old dog who is no longer enjoying life, and you are clearly a caring owner. As long as there is nothing causing real serious welfare issues you can then go home and think about it and prepare yourself if you do decide it's time, and give him the best time you can for as long as he has left.
     
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  11. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    Given that he's become so unhappy to be touched, is tucked up a lot and trembles/shakes, it does sound as though he's in pain.

    It does not appear he has any real quality of life - he's not enjoying anything.

    I would say yes, it is time to be thinking about easing him out of his World, which seems to be bringing him no pleasure.
     
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