Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Is it safe to allow Ivy to grow up the fencing of my dog run?

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Lunaakita93, Mar 23, 2020.


  1. Lunaakita93

    Lunaakita93 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2018
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    15
    I have a large dog run for my youngest dog. It is great for her as she is safe to run around and chill for an hour or 2 during the day, however it has changed the look for the garden.

    I was planning to plant ivy at the bottom of the fence and allow it to grow up the fencing, before buying it I checked and it says that some ivy is mildly toxic to dogs.
    Am I best just buying artificial?
    My puppy is 10 months and I don’t want to risk her safety but she’s never chewed a plant not even grass.

    Im just looking for some advice. Do you know of any live ivy that is not toxic or another climbing plant that would be safe?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Messages:
    16,625
    Likes Received:
    8,744
    Is she liable to try and eat it?

    Plastic would be as much of a danger is she were to consume that.
     
  3. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2013
    Messages:
    22,240
    Likes Received:
    31,224
    Jack will nibble long grass but he’s never shown any interest in anything else and I have a fair amount of ivy in the garden.

    Make sure she has plenty of toys out there to chew so she has less desire to look for trouble ;)
     
    Happy Paws2 likes this.
  4. Lunaakita93

    Lunaakita93 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2018
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    15
    No she had ate a very small amount of grass but nothing else. She shows no interest in eating any plant
     
  5. Lunaakita93

    Lunaakita93 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2018
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    15
    Yea she has lots of toys and gets her bones in the run so she has space to eat them from the other dogs.
    The same as your Jack she has never shown interest in eating plants . I’m just being cautious as she is left unsupervised sometimes in the run and I need to know she is safe.
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  6. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    17,374
    Likes Received:
    10,581
    If she's behind a screen of ivy or anything else, it will be harder to see her and know she's safe. Will she be in the run when you're home? If so, why? Why not just have her with you? Or is it for when you're out?
     
  7. Lunaakita93

    Lunaakita93 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2018
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    15
    She is only in the run for short periods if I’m home such as if I’m in a shower or cleaning the floors in the house and also if she is eating a bone as I separate the dogs when they are eating.

    She is also in the run if I’m going out if the weather is ok. I wouldn’t leave her in the run if it was a very hot day or super cold.
     
  8. Lunaakita93

    Lunaakita93 PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2018
    Messages:
    71
    Likes Received:
    15
    I should also say she lives in the house, she sleeps on my bed and is very much part of the family. This is just a safe place for her in the garden. It’s a large run and she has an indoor area with in it. Quite often when I’m home and the run door and the house door are open she will choose to chill for a while in her run.
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  9. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    17,374
    Likes Received:
    10,581
    OK, got it.
    I wouldn't use ivy though. If she chews it, the sap wouldn't be good and it really can take over once it gets its feet under the table. For a screen, I'd use something more useful/nicer to look at. Climbing French beans, runner beans, taller varieties of peas. If she eats those, it's nutrition. Not clematis - part of the buttercup family and therefore toxic. For the longer term, fruit trees trained as fan or espalier - apples, pears, plums, cherries on dwarfing rootstocks. If south facing and out of the wind, a fig could do well and shade the run. Or for purely decorative effect, an evergreen ceanothus, cotoneaster, hydrangea petiolaris, Freemontodendron (evergreen, orange/yellow flowers in later summer (needs sun), honeysuckles (there's a nice semi-evergreen variety with small leaves with yellow veins - Lonicera Japonica aureoreticulata). Others to avoid - plumbago, solanum, cotinus, anything thorny.
     
    Torin. likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice