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Is it ok to say No?

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by ruthie213, May 18, 2010.


  1. ruthie213

    ruthie213 PetForums Newbie

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    I got a pup on saturday, it was a sort of rehoming due to one of the children being allergic to her that he had to be hspitalised, since she has come to my place, I have learnt that she is VERY nippy, which ive seen is normal, and some other naughty behaviours such as jumping etc, but all the books ive read has said to ignore her if she does stuff like that but if she is nipping at my toes or my hands (with teeth that are becoming quite sharp) while im completely still is it ok to say no?
     
  2. jen24

    jen24 Banned

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    with nipping we let out a loud 'eeee' noise like mummy dog would instead of saying no. but i do say no for jumping up at the same time as turning and facing my back to them.

    you will get a lot of mixed feelings and opinions on this. id say do what you feel best with.
     
  3. spid

    spid PetForums VIP

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    I agree - go with what feels natural for you - there are some peole that manage not to say no (I can't do it - it is SO natural for me - it's almost like a 'leave it') and how they manage it I don't know cos it pops out of my mouth before I know it. You have to do what is best for you and your family. Have a look at the sticky at the top of the section on puppy biting etc some really good stuff there.
     
  4. katiefranke

    katiefranke PetForums VIP

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    If you make a little squeal and turn your back, they should get the message! I also found that sometimes if a pup is too worked up the squeal can make them more excited though, so i use a sharp intake of breath (like when you stub your toe type noise) and then turned my back, which calmed things down straight away. If for any reason this didnt work, I would try once more and if after the second time it didnt have an effect, I would leave the room or pup in her pen for a 'time out'.

    So I guess as the others have said, do what comes naturally - but in my experience, for this particular problem, there is no need to say no, as my reaction would have been to go 'oww' or 'sharp breath intake' for the pain of nipping anyway!!

    Yep as spid says, there is a good thread at the top of this training section with some useful tips on how to deal with puppy nipping!
     
  5. CarolineH

    CarolineH PetForums VIP

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    If a squeal doesn't work or excites the pup further, a well timed, growled 'Oi!' or No!' works wonders. ;) Forgive straight afterwards and don't hold a grudge. Pups don't understand grudges. Forgiving straight after when the bad behaviour has ceased will be understood though.
     
  6. JSR

    JSR PetForums VIP

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    It's a 'HEY' with a stern look in my house!! Works much better than a squeal, and you don't feel quiet to silly either!!!:lol:
     
  7. kaisa624

    kaisa624 PetForums VIP

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    We normally say "Oi!" or "No!", with praise once the behaviour has stopped! She loves her praise. We don't have a problem with jumping up as we just say "Off!" as she starts, then she doesn't bother. However with larger pups/dogs, turning your back works wonders :)
     
  8. ruthie213

    ruthie213 PetForums Newbie

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    Hey, well Ive had a few attempts and after losing a pair of sandals to the chewing she seems not to be nipping as much, we are enrolling i think for a puppy school which will be beneficial i think!
     
  9. lucysnewmum

    lucysnewmum PetForums Senior

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    you dont say how old this puppy is....but i suspect she is quite young as you say her teeth are extremely sharp which leads me to think that she is probably teething as well as not knowing that jumping up isnt the way forward!

    give her plenty of chew toys. ice cubes are brilliant for sore little gums or put a kong in the freezer for a while until it is really cold.

    dont feel bad about using the word NO. if it comes naturally it will fall out of your mouth before you realise. some trainers take the positive reinforcement to the absolute limit! i believe that a firm NO followed by tons of praise for compliance will do no harm in the long run. the NO will just become another command letting the dog know that the behaviour is not required thank you very much as long as it is followed up by very positive, over the top praise for not nipping.

    i teach all my dogs "NO TEETH". i call them to me, and give them a fuss on the chest. as long as they do not attempt to nip or bite i say "NO TEETH" "GOOD GIRL/BOY" and continue fussing them. if they nip i say "TEETH" and do not fuss them. after a while they get the message as the fuss is missing is they nip or bite!
     
  10. Acacia86

    Acacia86 PetForums VIP

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    I agree with all the above!! I can not really add much more.

    Except if you find your dog a chewer of things (like your shoes etc etc) then please remember dogs do not have the guilt factor! So if you walk into a room where she has chewed something and she ''looks guilty'' it is down to your body langauge and ''aura'' and not a guilt! So telling her off is a no no! She will have no idea what she has done to upset you, and will therefore get very confused. Also pointing and showing a pup or dog will not make any difference! It will again be your tone and body that causes the so called ''guilt''

    When i first has a dog (a Lab) he looked guilty when he started chewing walls :eek: but it was actually my whole body language that made him feel worried. No i never ever shouted but i was so shocked i stood there for solid minutes!! LOL!!

    I wish you and your beloved pup all the best! Keep us updated! Oh and what breed is she?? (yes i am nosy!) xx
     
    #10 Acacia86, May 20, 2010
    Last edited: May 20, 2010
  11. Mum2Heidi

    Mum2Heidi PetForums VIP

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    Agree with everything thats been said as well.

    Another thought I had was - distraction. Only you know the pup and can work out what it responds to.

    Confrontation (bad choice of word)with Heidi just seemed to press the wrong buttons. Not enough and she carried on regardless, too much and she got all worried and panicky. Distraction into a much more fun game or "here chew this"and give her something of hers worked much better when she was small.

    Now she is a year old she seems to respond much better to "leave" and "no" but "no" tends to me more of a ah ah reminder than command. "leave" was taught as a game with a ball before we were able to use it fully. She is a really sensitive soul and we always seem to have to go round the back to get what we want :lol:

    You will soon suss out the make up of yours and what works :thumbup:
     
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