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Is is fair to keep a blind and deaf cat

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by Sparklefrog, Mar 23, 2021.


  1. Sparklefrog

    Sparklefrog PetForums Newbie

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    Hello, I am a new member. A year ago I rehomed a deceased friends elderly cats (16yrs).
    As it turns out one of them has had a stroke. The vet says they should never have been rehomed. Faiser used to fall over alot and back legs are slow to respond. However, he walks alot around the house, constantly. They are indoor cats. We also believe that Faiser is deaf and partially sited. He makes alot of mess eating, sometimes eating the bowl! Walks in the water bowl. He missed the litter tray more often than not, and the other day we had to fish him out of the pond!

    All this said..... he is a small fluffy cat that loves attention. My son is very attached to him. The other cat Jessie ... is a nocturnal scaredy cat, 16yrs, and runs away from us. She meows when she can't find Faiser.

    The Vet said he should never have been re-homed.

    The question is...
    Is it fair to Fraiser to keep him ? Or is it fairer to put him to sleep. I know he's messy and it causes stress in the house but if Fraiser still seems happy is it fair on him to put him to sleep?
     
  2. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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    If he is happy, taking part in family life etc then I see no reason to have him pts. Elderly cats, even with some disabilities, can still have a comfortable life.
    Does your vet think that Frasier is suffering or in pain?
     
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  3. Sparklefrog

    Sparklefrog PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks. Before he came to us he was skin and bone and the cat rehoming center gave him a thyroid operation. This is when the vet thinks he has the stroke. The vet says he is not gaining weight as fast as he should, doesn't think the operation to remove thyroid worked and says he is still poorly.
     
  4. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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    It's a difficult decision then. Is he on medication?
    I've moved your thread over to the cat forum by the way. Someone may be able to help.
     
  5. Sparklefrog

    Sparklefrog PetForums Newbie

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    No. No medication, thats why the rehoming center gave him the op.
     
  6. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    I'm confused... If he had a thyroid operation he should be on meds.
    How long ago was the operation?
    One of my cats is on thyroid meds (for life) and she had to be rechecked to make sure we were giving her the right dose.
     
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  7. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    His environment needs to be safe too, so no chance of falling in the pond again and restricted to a car proofed garden.
     
  8. QOTN

    QOTN PetForums VIP

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    A boy I bred had his thyroid glands removed when he was eleven. He was taken to my own vet so I know his owner was told the chance of him becoming hypothyroid at his age was virtually nil but to keep an eye on him. He was fine.

    Another boy I bred was blind and deaf by the time he was about eighteen. I was dubious about the wisdom of keeping him alive but I used to visit him occasionally and he seemed to cope very well until he died of old age when he was nearing twenty. I think it depends on the safety of the situation. His environment must never change and he needs plenty of attention.
     
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  9. Arny

    Arny PetForums VIP

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    I had a cat who needed an eye removed in her teens and then became deaf in old age. As it turned out she also had hyperthyroidism so was on medication.
    At those points we never thought about putting her to sleep as she acted very well, in fact after the eye removal it was like she was a kitten again as clearly she'd been in pain.
    Eventually we had to say goodbye when she developed cancer just before her 20th birthday.

    If the vet thinks his thyroid isn't under control have you thought about getting it checked? Its just a blood test that your vet can likely do in house.
    The thyroid is responsible for keeping a lot of things in check and you'd be amazed how quickly they get back to normal when its stabilised.
     
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  10. Douglas’ Dad

    Douglas’ Dad PetForums Senior

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    I would go to a feline specialist if you can afford it. They will know far more than your vet and will have experience of the most serious cases and how they were managed.
     
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  11. QOTN

    QOTN PetForums VIP

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    I don't really understand how the thyroid surgery might not have worked unless only one gland was removed. He cannot be hyperthyroid if he no longer has his thyroid. Sometimes hyperthyroidism can hide CKD so it might be an idea to blood test him to find out. CKD can often be controlled with medication as can hyperthyroidism.

    If you think he is partially sighted, do his pupils still contract in light? If so, he may still have a pupillary light reflex which will enable him to distinguish between bright light and shade but his retina may be destroyed.
     
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  12. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    Sometimes there is ectopic thyroid tissue which can't be removed surgically.
     
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  13. QOTN

    QOTN PetForums VIP

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    Wouldn't it be possible to identify that during the procedure? I know our vet said the thyroid can be in an other than expected place. I wonder why the vet treating Faiser now hasn't done a blood test.
     
  14. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    It's often not possible to identify it at surgery - it can be under the tongue, next to the heart or in other places. This is partly why the radioactive iodine treatment is good, it deals with ectopic tissue as well.
     
  15. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    But he could still be on meds.
    I have a cat with hyperthyroid. She had a blood test to confirm, put her on meds, recheck in a month to make sure the dose is appropriate, and she's doing great. I just have to dose her twice a day, and it's not a big deal at all.

    I don't understand why there wasn't bloodwork done after the operation to make sure it worked, and then add meds if needed.
     
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