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Is he right for us?

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by ColeyCheese, Jun 15, 2017.


  1. ColeyCheese

    ColeyCheese PetForums Newbie

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    on Tuesday we adopted a 2 year old old tyme bulldog (boy) we already have a 15 year old white boxer (girl) we was told the 2 year old was well trained got along with other dogs and children but at feeding time he is very protective of his food, our priority is the older daddy g of course as she has been here in this house 15 years. They've been great with eachother but they both seem to pretend the other is not there till food is around then the 2 year old will become weary and snap at the older dog today we was eating pizza and even though the dogs sit and wait for food they never get given our food just their own so the 2 year old was sat waiting & the older dog came in to investigate as she does and he snapped at her face a drew blood we split them up and the younger pup was punished since we have been very anxious around them they have both gone to being fine together but we are all very cautious of them being around eachother does anybody have any help or tips that I can try before we make our final decision on the pup? As of course the older dog is priority and if it carries on the pup will need to be rehomed?
     
  2. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    How did you punish the younger dog?
     
  3. labradrk

    labradrk PetForums VIP

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    Where did you adopt the new one from - a rescue or a private rehome?

    The Bulldog is resource guarding. You can train a dog out of it but it would also be a case of management for life especially in a multi dog household. If you have multiple dogs you need to be VERY careful around feeding time and food in general to avoid conflict.

    You would obviously need in house help from a behaviourist to implement this. Punishment will make it MUCH worse.

    If you have children can I please suggest that you exercise extreme caution them in allowing them near the dog obviously when it's eating or around toys or it's bed as they are also common to guard.
     
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  4. ColeyCheese

    ColeyCheese PetForums Newbie

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    we got our new dog from a private home which has three children living in that household they said the reason for rehoming was because he kept jumping at the new born babies cot. The 15 year old is well used to being around dogs all her life as she had a partner for about 13 years and she's very chilled and doesn't mind sharing her house. We have plenty of time to put into this as we are home all day. So would you suggest seeking profetional help?
     
  5. ColeyCheese

    ColeyCheese PetForums Newbie

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    he was smacked on the bum and was made to sit on the sofa and not move for a little while. I've never dealt with this before in my life as the two dogs I had before this got along perfectly. I'm not sure how I was supposed to deal with him so that was just my immediate reaction.
     
  6. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Not the right way to deal with it and likely to make his guarding worse.

    Yes, get the help of a good behaviourist via a vet referral. Someone who uses positive, reward based methods.

    In the meantime feed the dogs in separate rooms and leave the new dog in peace to eat. Avoid handing out treats with other dog or people around.
     
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  7. ColeyCheese

    ColeyCheese PetForums Newbie

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    I will talk to my vet tomorrow and ask for the best methods or people to get in to contact with.
    As I said I wasn't sure how to react as I've never done this before but they do get fed in seperate rooms and have done since he got here, it was just while the people were eating.
     
  8. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    Think like a dog for a moment. Imagine you being in a restaurant and someone hovering - in your view poised to steal your meal - you would guard it too. And for the purpose of this example, the anticipation of pizza counts as a resource your newcomer thought of as a possible meal. Someone else restraining you (slapping you and making you sit away from your meal) would make you angry, resentful, and importantly FAR more protective of your food. So, you guard it all the harder.

    Take the perceived threat away by feeding him separately, by himself, in a room with no interruptions. Leave him to finish before you go in. If you choose to keep him, as he is eating you can start dropping even better things by his bowl so he associates your approach as a good thing, not a threat. But that's for later; let us know if you choose to keep him on.
     
  9. ColeyCheese

    ColeyCheese PetForums Newbie

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    I understand what you mean about it all and I'll be trying my best to resolve the situation. I'll keep you posted
     
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  10. Darkangelwitch

    Darkangelwitch Princess Shona

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    One rule I have always had in my house (I have 3 dogs at the moment) is that they all have to go lay down when humans are eating. They cannot lay down near the humans i.e. under the table etc.

    At doggy feeding time they must be laying down while their food is prepared and cannot go to their bowl until told to.

    It keeps control and the dogs know exactly what is expected of them - dogs need consistency.

    You need to start making rules the new dog can understand and keep to it.

    I think if you get a behaviourist in quickly you can resolve his resource guarding and have a happy multi dog household.
     
  11. ouesi

    ouesi Guest

    Your dog is doing what's called Resource Guarding.
    It's a very normal dog behavior, though obviously not acceptable in our human world.

    Resource guarding stems from fear of losing the resource (in this case food), so punishing the dog for guarding just exacerbates that fear and often makes the guarding worse.

    The good news is, resource guarding is a fairly straight-forward fix, and with the guidance of a good trainer/behaviorist you should be able to sort this fairly easily.
    There is also a sticky in this forum on resource guarding that might be worth a read-through :)
    http://www.petforums.co.uk/threads/resource-guarding.279444/
     
    #11 ouesi, Jun 16, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2017
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  12. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    If you weren't keen to resolve the problem in the correct way, you wouldn't be here.

    No, smacking him was not the correct response, but we all make mistakes and particularly in the heat of the moment.
     
    #12 Rafa, Jun 16, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2017
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  13. ColeyCheese

    ColeyCheese PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you I'm glad I'm not alone, I've spoken to the vet this morning and she has given me leaflets of people to contact and the easiest and most effective ways to resolve this so hopefully we are on the right track they have been fed in seperate rooms again today and everything was fine now they are both fast asleep after their afternoon walk! Thank you all for your time and advice hopsefullg they'll be ok from now onwards :)
     
    #13 ColeyCheese, Jun 16, 2017
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2017
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  14. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    I hope for the best for you too.

    Do stay around, there are some very knowledgeable members here who can help and support you.
     
  15. Tizwaz

    Tizwaz PetForums Junior

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    Hi I've mentioned this before on the forum I really hope it may help our dog was aggressive to us over food at 12 weeks the behaviourist advised to feed her before ourselves feed three bowls of food as soon as one was empty put another down let her know there's plenty and she doesn't have to fight for food and not to let her get to hungry when we got another dog they were feed separately at first it was a horrible time we had never had anything like it before dinner time was traumatic we were terrified food may be on the floor it was amazing to see the gradual change in her they eat together now although never unsupervised just in case he said why make them wait for there food whilst we eat it makes sense really but I I'd always thought the old fashioned way I didn't know any different I'm so gllad we didn't keep on that way I sure it would have got worse not better good luck sorry for the rambling
     
  16. Tizwaz

    Tizwaz PetForums Junior

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    Also don't feel bad about you reaction we all do it sometimes I've smacked mine in reaction to bad behaviour I know it's wrong I love my dogs but it's a bit like with kids we make mistakes learn together and move on
     
  17. cows573

    cows573 PetForums Senior

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    Perhaps it might be wise, in the meantime, to not have your new dog in the same room as you while you eat. To prevent potential conflict between your two dogs...
     
  18. ColeyCheese

    ColeyCheese PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you all for your advice, they've been getting a long much better now that they are more femiliar they eat in seperate rooms at meal times and we eat at the table while they are in the living room we are on the right track now thank you all again I will keep you all updated to the progress
     
  19. ColeyCheese

    ColeyCheese PetForums Newbie

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    Today we overcame another problem of theirs as they have only known eachother a few days they have just been pretending the other one isn't there like pushing the other out the way but today we took them both on a walk like we usually do but they both was let off their leads of course we was extremely cautious with this and had three adults supervising but instead of walking away from eachother they came together and was playing happily jumping around running playing with toys they are so much more happy now!!
     
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  20. Tizwaz

    Tizwaz PetForums Junior

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    Hi lovely to hear things are getting better it's scary isn't it when you're worried they won't get along I literally felt unable to cope mainly I was afraid for the smaller dog we rescued her and I felt so sad she didn't deserve the bigger dogs hostility now however they play together sometimes sleep together it was really worth the hard work I hope it keeps getting better for you because it's amazing to see them having fun together
     
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