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intermittant misbehaving

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by meisha, Jul 10, 2009.


  1. meisha

    meisha PetForums Junior

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    i already have a lhasa apso gemma who i got from 8 weeks on. i took joey on at 14 week as his new owneer couldnt cope with him and the next one couldnt either.. :eek:
    i fell in love with him when i saw him and wanted a companion for gemma anyhow so took him on.
    we have had him 3 months now and he is very clingy, jealous of gemma playing or getting a love.
    he is a bit of a barker which i dont mind in the garden as lhasas tend to be territorial anyhow but he barks at people in the street and since his castration last week he barks and scratches at night! its come from nowhere this behaviour as he settled down after 3 weeks of getting him.
    why do you think he is behaving like this?
    its causing problems between me and my other half as he isnt as patient as me and i guess they are my babies not his so its my responsibility to sort it out but i cant just tell joey to be quiet because the more i get up in the night to tell him the more attention he gets etc etc..
    i've been kipping on the couch this week and its caused so much problems. he is also starting to jump up when i am preparing meals which is encouraging my other dog to do it and jumping on the couch when we have trained them to not do this.
    any advice on why he could be doing the barking at night all over again. he is nearly 7 months old.
    xx:eek:ut:
     
  2. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

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    Hi Meisha,

    I have to say, unfortunately, dogs push boundaries as far as we let them, its usually down to us as handlers to make sure they know where those boundaries are. It sounds like, to me, that Joey has got you very well trained.

    It's going to be hard, but to get them to act like dogs, you have to treat them like dogs, not babies. The barking for attention is because they get it, if they get the attention that they seek, they will continue the behaviour.

    The best way you can appreciate a dog is to let it be just that, you can't associate or try and equate how they behave to human emotions. I absolutely adore my two Labradors, they mean the world to me; in return for being the most wonderful dogs, I give them a good diet, exercise and training. I believe they lead very balanced lives, and in return I get very balanced dogs.

    You need to take things right back to basics, both for yourself, and your dogs, you're the human, and learn how to handle them as dogs. It's very easy with any pet to try and get them to fill some gap in our lives, and mould them into it, giving them emotions and feelings that they really don't have, except in our minds. I hope that doesn't come across as critical, it's just the way humans are, we're all guilty of it to some extent. There's no quick fix for your dogs as far as I see it, I'm afraid it's down to learning how to handle them, and applying training with them.

    I hope you can get Joey to behave more appropriately and settle down with Gemma, owning dogs is a luxury, learning how to be a good dog handler is an even better luxury :)
     
  3. meisha

    meisha PetForums Junior

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    thank you, you are absolutely right. joey has me wrapped round his finger but because his barkig is at innappropriate times like 1am on a working day night i have to go to him to shut him up. my partner has a very stressful job and really does not have the patience for a clingy 7 month old pup to be barking at silly o'clock. i had to do it for the 3rd time in a week last night. of course he shut up coz he got his own way but today i realised that unless we nip this in the bud FAST he has to go. he is at the vets today for a post op check following his castration so i will have words then. and i know some may think this is cruel but for the time being a muzzle is in order. my sil has one for her dog and he can drink with it on, pant and growl. but not bark.
    i am not so sure about anti bark collars but am happy to try to the muzzle
     
  4. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

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    Hi Meisha,

    I've not heard of using a muzzle to stop barking? I know there are spray collars you can get to stop barking, although I'm not keen on that sort of thing, if you have no other option it might be worth trying?

    Mine try it on as well, they're by no means perfect. I always try and make a point of rewarding them when they're behaving well, rather than continually over fuss them, or have to resort to telling them off, so going from one extreme to the other. I have mine in a run outside during the day, if they bark for attention at all, I ignore them (when I can), but if not I'll just go and put them in a down and then leave them again without a fuss. I've not long got back in from just going out and giving them both a bit of a fuss as they've been good all morning, and besides it's nice to give them a cuddle.

    With Joey, try and really be consistent with him, set your stall out to make sure you treat him the same way from now on. Don't allow him to perform for attention and get it. Tau will try and goad me into giving her a fuss by putting her paw on me, it looks cute as if she's asking me for another fuss Mum; in actual fact she's not got the capability to reason like that, but if she's rewarded with more fuss, then the paw obviously gets her what she wants. But if that's the worst of my worries I'm happy, sometimes she gets a fuss, sometimes she doesn't ;)
     
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