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Insane Labrador Puppy Going To Break My Neck :cryin:

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by casperibz, Mar 30, 2011.


  1. casperibz

    casperibz PetForums Newbie

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    I have a 2 and a half year old Spaniel and a 10 month old Labrador, my boyfriend and I live in a large apartment in Spain and the problem we are having is taking both the dogs out at the same time, they are fine when they get outside, it's just from the front door, down the stairs and out the door, the Labrador just goes insane barking the whole way from the front door until we get outside which sets the other dog off, not only that but the pulling, he is so strong he is litterally going to pull me down one day and i'm going to have a bad accident. We have actually had to move apartments this week because of complaints from our neighbours, and I don't want the same thing to start in the new place.

    We have tried, different types of leads, harnesses, muzzle, taking them down seperately which works but that's not possible all the time, my boyfriend starts work at 8 in the morning so he will take them down for a walk before work then I meet up with my friend and her dogs in the afternoon and it's just getting to hard to do on my own, I actually dread it, sometime's it's had me in tears, or I have cancelled at the fear of taking them out. Then in the evening and before bed my boyfriend I take them out again which is fine.

    I don't know what else to do to stop it...

    There is that and then there's when my boyfriend brings them back from their morning walk, the Spaniel comes straight into bed with me and goes to sleep, the Lab used to do the same but for the past month he just won't settle down, he seems to find things everywhere, I don't even know how he gets some of the things he does and he chews them to bits, he chewed a hole in the bottom of my matress while I was asleep he eats whole socks, he goes through my handbag, eats kitchen utensils, he ate 4 razor blades and a toothbrush, it's not as though these things are in his reach so I don't know how he got them! I'm really worried he is going to do some serious damage to himself, but I can't get up every morning just to watch him when he gets back from his walk.

    :cryin:

    Any ideas anyone?
     
  2. 912142

    912142 PetForums VIP

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  3. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Banned

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    They must be within his reach, mustn't they, or he could not have got them. Dogs can get to all sorts of places that a child might not be able to. If he is getting into the bathroom to steal razor blades, and the door cannot be locked from the outside, then turn the handles upside down. I have watched a dog climb up on to the worktop and open the wall cupboards in the kitchen. If he is determined he will find a way. If he is getting into your handbag, take it to bed with you.

    Do you work into the early hours of the morning?

    As to the excitement getting him out, you need to teach them both to sit and wait and don't put their leads on until they are calm. If they get excited, take the lead off and sit down. They will soon get the message that they are not going anywhere until they are calm. My two go nuts when it comes to getting out the door, but I don't have to get them down the stairs and with a large dog of only ten months, if it has to be done, it has to be done calmly. If he starts to bark, take him back indoors until he is calm again. It will take time, but he will get the message eventually.

    He is just coming into his adolescent stage and labradors are working dogs. You should look carefully into his food, as well. If he is having too much protein or something with lots of additives and colourants, this is going to make him hyperactive.

    Try getting him a Kong and stuff it with nice treats and peanut butter, freeze it overnight and give it to him in the morning to keep him occupied.
     
  4. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

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    Yes, this should be quite easy to improve, if you're able to work on it calmly and patiently and be consistent. The barking sounds like excitement barking, so you need to remain calm and quiet to avoid feeding it.

    The Lab is probably bored and needing more mental stimulation, as well as objects he can legitimately chew on.

    Quick fix : consider a walking harness, with front clip attachment. That improves safety by the dog not being able to pull & drive to where he's going, as he'll be pulled off line and round, if he does so. That then allows you to concentrate calmly on training your dog to be calmer and walk better.

    Then, using a rewards and witholding reward approach, you simply have your dog sit calmly. If he begins to bark, or show excitement, turn round and go back a way; then try again. I train my dog to "Wait!", pausing briefly, so I don't have eager bolting through doorways and gates, but can check safety before allowing him through.

    It's likely to help if you set up practice sessions, where you can go in & out, when you don't feel rushed. Otherwise you're likely to get frustrated.

    The main motivation is likely to be getting out and the walk, food rewards will work better, when you're practicing things like sit, or lie down, that are aids to calmness and managing the dog.
     
  5. keirk

    keirk PetForums Member

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    I would work on RobD-BCactive suggestions but by the sounds of it the pup has too much freedom and not enough stimulation.

    Kongs and crates and some training at home would sort this little pup out in no time.

    Hours and hours of walking will not wear a young lab out - but 10 mins to clicking training will.

    When you can't watch him - he should be in a crate for his own safety, with something that will occupy him (his breakfast stuffed in a kong for example).
     
  6. DirtyGertie

    DirtyGertie PetForums VIP

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    I'm not criticising, just asking - you said

    but I can't get up every morning just to watch him when he gets back from his walk

    Is there a reason for this? Do you work and your hours mean you go to bed very late so early rising is not possible?

    What time does your boyfriend leave your apartment?

    Can you get up when he leaves and if necessary alter your bedtime so you go earlier until your pup settles down a bit?

    I had to do this when we got Poppy. I found it very tiring, especially when my OH was in hospital for a month so couldn't share the early morning duties, but earlier bedtimes compensated to some degree.

    Dogs are a big responsibility and commitment and sometimes we have to make a sacrifice with our own routine to make sure they are happy, healthy and well mannered.
     
    babycham2002 likes this.
  7. candysmum

    candysmum PetForums VIP

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    Candy use to pull like a trooper. and being such a strong dog it killed your shoulders however i got a plastic bottle and filled with water and when she pulled squirted her. she soon learnt not to pull.

    It should work for barking too as you can get the collars that do it when dogs bark.

    It got to the point i didn't even have to squirt candy i just made the bottle crackle. I still carry it becasue sometimes like all dogs she does push the boundries.
     
  8. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    You have two relatively young dogs, Two together can tend to bounce off each other behaviour wise, and influence each other. It would take a lot of extra time and effort, but personally I think it might be better if you put in some work and training with them separately. Have you done any basic obdience training with them, or taken them to training classes? If not it may be an idea to have a couple of individual training sessions with them each day, even 2 or 3 10/15 minute ones you can achieve a lot. Just teaching the basics, of sit, wait, stay down etc. Use reward based training with treats.
    Once you get a reliable response, then you should be able to use it on your walks, Walking them individually at least some of the time while you are gaining control. Have you tried a Head Collar, this should give you better control of his head, to halt and turn him, Flat collars and harnesses allow dogs to pull more and gain control. Dont know what length lead you use at the moment, but try a shorter lead, or even one of the very short handling leads that are about a foot or so and the handle. You can always clip on the normal lead after hes outside and calmed down. If when you get the lead out,
    he starts to get hyped straight away. Just put it away again and sit down. and wait and keep repeating it until you can get him to sit wait calmly to put it on (This is were the earlier training sessions treating him a reliable sit,wait should help) He should learn hyper barking behaviour doesnt get him taken out. When you get to the door again make him sit and wait, dont open the door until he sits and wait calmly. Then open it, but make him sit and wait again. If the barking or pulling starts close the door and keep reapeating until he can sit and wait with the door open. Then go through and invite him out.
    At the stop of the steps sit wait again, dont descend until he can sit and wait and be told when to descend. Use treats, rewarding him for the behaviour every time he does good. The head collar should give you more control too. When you can get this reliable after a few weeks, then maybe try taking them out together but with too of you going, putting both dogs through the same exercise, until you get outside. Then maybe try the two together once they are trained to do everything reliably. Sorry its so long winded but explaining everything is the only way on the internet.

    On the subject of chewing, from what I understand Labs are notorious chewers or can be. Have you tried giving him, things that he can chew. After his walk, give him hide chews, Different safe chew toys, Kongs stuffed with wet frozen food and a few extra goodies. Treat balls are good, You fill them with kibble annd set them to distribute bits here and there as the play.
    As he is also a danger to himself. Crate training may be an idea too, put him in with some chewies. If you havent used a crate though, seek information as done wrongly they wont take too it, especially as he is the age he now is and if never been in one.

    Hope this might give you some ideas. If they have bever been to training classes that also would probably help and be worth looking into.
    Just one other idea, That might desensitise him to getting hyped when the lead comes out is, If you get a short handling lead, Just clip it on from time to time in the apartment and leave it on. He could possibly learn then that lead doesnt mean going out always, so you may find he doesnt get so hyped and over excited when it does come out for the proper walks.
     
  9. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

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    I used to do that sled dog - I would put Flynns harness on for the day and walk him when I was ready, also handling his lead often in the house and leave it on the sofa. He now isn't excited at all about going out and often goes to sleep after his harness is put on - sometimes not wanting to go out at all when i'm ready. Def helps with his excitement knowing the harness/lead doesn't always mean "walkies"! ;)
     
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