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Information about Pregnant Cats - Information collection

Discussion in 'Cat Breeding' started by Tanya1989, Apr 27, 2011.


  1. Tanya1989

    Tanya1989 PetForums VIP

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    As mentioned on the other thread:
    Lets work collectively to gather information in a nice healthy debate, I can "play" at the part of the clueless person (I'm good at that ;) )

    My First Question (keep it on topic- there will be lots more questions):

    What makes a cat suitable to be bred from?
     
    Gratch likes this.
  2. Depending on the breed. I should think similar to dogs health is vital and there are health tests for certain breeds of cat. So these should be done before entering a breeding program with said cat.

    The cat should be of good size, an overly small/sicky cat could encounter problems.

    Others would be able to answer better, not sure if cat showing is as important as is in dogs.
     
  3. classixuk

    classixuk PetForums VIP

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    I can play clueless too. Not too difficult. :eek:

    "I think my cat is pregnant, she is fat around the belly. When will the kittens arrive?"
    Some top-down reference photos of the changing shape of the queen during her pregnancy, as well as examples of behavioural changes at each stage would be helpful here. The owner is unlikely to know the exact date of the mating (based on previous threads). I know you guys will recommend a vet's visit, but for the enquiring mind at 1AM this at least gets them started.

    "She looks less than X weeks pregnant, so what's next?"
    List options here such as spay with benefits and pregnancy with cautions.

    "She looks like the last picture, does that mean the kittens will be coming soon?"
    Now begins the shopping list of things to do...e.g. Vets informed and emergency number to hand, nesting area ready, food ready, etc.

    "Help. One of the kittens isn't moving or breathing"
    How to resuscitate a kitten and what to do with the kitten if this does not work.

    "Help. 2 of the kittens have gone missing EDIT 3 now, 1 more has gone since I did this post! :eek:".
    Explanation of what is happening and how they can make the nesting area feel more secure for the queen.

    "How many boys and how many girls?"
    How to sex a kitten.

    "Which food will they need?"

    Give a clear choice here (a supermarket brand for the uninitiated, and an alternative food that can be purchased in a quality pet-shop).

    Will that do for starters? I think the above questions are all good examples of things that a pregnant cat owner might need answering.
     
  4. Tanya1989

    Tanya1989 PetForums VIP

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    How can you diagnose pregnancy?
    Can you scan a cat? Is there a blood test? Is there a pee on a stick type thing? When is the best time to scan? Is palpation an option? Is there a risk in a singleton litter?

    Should I change my cats food when pregnant?


    What are the risks of going over due date?
    What is I don't know the due date? When should I worry? When should a vet intervene?
     
    #4 Tanya1989, Apr 27, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2011
  5. Taylorbaby

    Taylorbaby PetForums VIP

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    to see if a cat is pregnant, look her her nipples, normally very pale and tiny (literally cant see tiny!) if she is in kitten (pregnant) they will be very large and pink! They 'pink up' from 3 weeks pregnant, so if it is a accidental litter, neutering can still take place, possible up to alot later (ask the vet though)

    vets can feel kittens from 3weeks gone, bones go softer around 5-6weeks of age so then harder to feel!!

    Scans can be done, cant rem weeks gone amount though, prob 3weeks?

    *****

    Feed Good quality food cats each up to 4times as much when in kitten, free feeding constant supply whenever she wants Never let her be hungry, kitten meat & kitten biscuits are advice for extra nutritants, but if you feed adult meat & kitten biscuits for example that should be finem, just make sure they are good quality, add extra food to her diet, chicken berast, fish, quality meat pouches hi life etc

    *****

    They give birth around 60-70 days, with the 'average' at 63-65, so its obviously best/vital to know when she was mated, always call the vet if worried before taking her down, as the trip can stress her, so call them and give them details, they will say whether she needs to go in or not...

    (please edit as needed Im not really with it, wroite this quite quickly!)
     
    #5 Taylorbaby, Apr 27, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2011
  6. classixuk

    classixuk PetForums VIP

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    "I read in another post about palpation or something. What is that and will my cat need it done?"

    ;)
     
  7. Taylorbaby

    Taylorbaby PetForums VIP

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    can do, but its normally quite obvious by the nipples! and they normall start to show around 5weeks to 6 weeks gone!
     
  8. Myanimalmadhouse

    Myanimalmadhouse PetForums VIP

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    Palpation of the Cat's Abdomen

    Your veterinarian may be able to feel fetuses by palpating (feel by gently pressing) your queen's abdomen, usually around the 17th-20th day of pregnancy.
     
  9. Tanya1989

    Tanya1989 PetForums VIP

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    Are there any risks?
     
  10. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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    Palpation is done by a vet to feel for kittens. It isn't always necessary. Cats can give birth to between 1 and 10 kittens (rare), 4 - 5 being an average.
    Pinking of nipples at around 3 weeks from mating is the most common way of telling if a cat is pregnant. If this is the first indication that you think your cat may be pregnant (i.e you did not know that she had been with a tom cat) consult a vet straight away to discuss your options which can include spaying and aborting at this early stage.
     
  11. Tanya1989

    Tanya1989 PetForums VIP

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    Are there any risks with singletons like with dogs?
     
  12. Taylorbaby

    Taylorbaby PetForums VIP

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    personally thats too early, my vets certainly didnt / couldnt feel a kitten so early, plus her nipples wouldnt be pink so you would have no reason to think that she was in kitten to have her felt for kits, SO I still go with 3weeks & over :)
     
  13. classixuk

    classixuk PetForums VIP

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    Why would I want to abort my lovely kittens? Isn't that cruel?

    ;)
     
  14. Myanimalmadhouse

    Myanimalmadhouse PetForums VIP

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    This should always be done by a proffesional as pressing too hard can damage the unborn kittens.
     
  15. Myanimalmadhouse

    Myanimalmadhouse PetForums VIP

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    This has to be a personal decision. Are you prepared to look after all the kittens if you cant find them new loving homes?

    Are you prepared for the possibility that your cat and kittens may not survive the birth?

    You must weigh up all your pros and cons and decide which you believe to be the right choice for you and your cat.
     
  16. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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    a single kitten is likely to be larger than one of a multiple litter so would be more likely to cause difficulties during delivery, possibly requiring veterinary intervention.
     
  17. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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  18. flev

    flev PetForums Member

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    A stray that keeps coming into my garden looks like she might be pregnant. What should I do?
     
  19. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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    Try to find out if anyone in your area has lost a cat.
    I would advise contacting your local cat shelter unless you feel capable, financially as well as emotionally, of dealing with the birth of kittens and their upbringing
     
  20. Tanya1989

    Tanya1989 PetForums VIP

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    Changed the title of the thread until a better one can be thought of as the last one was giving the wrong impression of what the thread is about
     
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