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Indoor or Outdoor?

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by XScarletZ, Jan 6, 2019.


  1. Orla92

    Orla92 PetForums Junior

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    Oh wow! What is it that makes you think they'd be dead in 24hrs? Just from inexperience or..?
    I've no doubt that some cats maybe prefer their creature comforts to the opportunity to go outside!
    In the case of my Jasper, the lady I rehomed him from when he was about 10 months old, told me categorically that he's not a fan of going outside at all.
    But he really is! He makes that loud demanding MEOW when I lock the cat flap for whatever reason. He really likes to go and explore.
    But then my kitten Fiona, she's happy to go out into the back garden, sit on top the she'd and watch the world go by. She never really goes far.
    But I don't live on a busy road and it's fields for miles out the back of my house. So it's pretty much as safe as it can be I suppose!
    No farms nearby with grumpy farmers either!
     
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  2. SuboJvR

    SuboJvR Joey’s Mummy

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    Sometimes it’s the quiet roads that are the worse as they lull everyone into a false sense of security. Neighbours wise it doesn’t need to be ‘grumpy farmers’, just people who don’t want cat poop in their garden.

    If you’re truly out on your own in the sticks you are very lucky but that is not the situation for most people and if it became a requirement for cat ownership, we would have shelters even more overrun and a huge feral cat problem.
     
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  3. Amanda Sturdy

    Amanda Sturdy PetForums Member

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    I live in a rural area one of my neighbours found her cat dead and the postmortem was done at the vets it was poison the type used for mice.I know another of my neighbours uses poison in her outbuildings.We all have had mice at one point or other and let me tell you where there is one there are many so i cannot really blame anyone for getting rid of them.There is always going to be the indoor/outdoor debate but i for one am going to keep mine indoor i could not live with myself if anything happened that is just imo
     
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  4. Orla92

    Orla92 PetForums Junior

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    I wouldn't agree with that at all, it genuienally is safer than living on a busy road. It's always a risk letting your cat outdoors, but less so if you live somewhere quiet.
    And what I meant by the farmer thing is, if you do live somewhere more rural, your issue is farmers, because they don't like cats weeing in their hay bails.
    In some cases, it can cause a ewe in lamb to have issues with pregnancy.
    But they're not sheep fields out back of mine, that's all I meant.
    I don't think it should be a requirement at all, as I said in my previous posts, a cat with a happy home of any sorts is very very lucky!
     
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  5. MissMiloKitty

    MissMiloKitty PetForums Senior

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    Mine has no desire to go out either. Many cats are happy with an indoor only environment ☺
     
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  6. Scouttie

    Scouttie PetForums Member

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    Very strong opinions here - but the one thing everyone has in common is that they are loving owners who have very happy and well cared for cats.
     
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  7. Shane Kent

    Shane Kent Crazy Cat Gentleman

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    It is very different in Canada, in fact there are cities here that are considering by-laws about keeping cats indoors. The Humane Society and vets here urge people to keep their cats in the house. I don't allow my cats to roam around outside. Where I live, I would be considered a bad cat owner if I did. It is not illegal for me to allow them outside but I fully expect it may be within my lifetime. Where I live a lot of cat lovers treat their cats like a child. I have toys, tubes, large cat trees and lots and lots of kid and pet furniture for them.

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  8. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    I never understood why these debates are always so black and white. Either your cat is indoors, or the cat is outside, free-roaming, completely unsupervised.

    What about the indoor/outdoor cat who only goes outside when the owners are home to supervise?
    What about the indoor/outdoor cat who's 'outdoors' is a completely cat proofed garden?
    What about the barn cat who lives a cozy life inside a barn and never leave that barn?
    What about all the other ways cats can have ample access to the outside without being free-roaming?

    My dogs aren't free-roaming but they get plenty of outside time.
    My cats aren't free-roaming but they rarely come inside.

    Like above, in the US you are held responsible for your pet's behavior and allowing your pet to go crap in the neighbor's flower garden is not appreciated to say the least. Responsible pet owners keep tabs on their pets and don't allow them to be a nuisance or get predated or shot....
     
  9. Shane Kent

    Shane Kent Crazy Cat Gentleman

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    @O2.0 - My cats Zoe and Taz, the grey and ginger cats, go out on supervised visits. I don't let them roam. The other two are socialized feral cats that spent one cold snowy winter outside and have no interest in going outside, they won't go near the door.
     
  10. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    The discussion that causes the passion is in your first line. None of the rest applies, because the cats are contained. Free roaming cats are the ones at risk, and the ones who cause trouble with neighbors.

    I've got trouble with one of those free roamers right now. (not the first time) Around here though, free roamers aren't troublesome for long, because they usually get killed pretty quickly on the road or by coyotes. Come to think of it, I haven't seen that big fluffy gray and white cat, or his paw prints, who has been causing my cats so much stress, in a few weeks.
     
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  11. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    We rescued a great dane who had been dumped at a state park and gone feral.
    I think even when he was owned he had been an outside dog.
    Well, he came to live with us, discovered sofas, and I think he would have gladly been an inside only dog the rest of his life. We had to make him go out even for walks. Once out there he had fun, but seriously, if they could invent a great dane sized litterbox and an indoor play rink for him, he would have never felt the outside air again and been happy :D
     
  12. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Like I said before. I used to take them out in a protected fenced yard. They loved it. Four years ago I stopped because of the health of one of my cats. None of them have ever shown any signs of missing it (I miss it a lot) or interest in resuming. They are content with the small covered porch, cat proofed with deer fencing.
     
  13. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Yup, even though a certain ex-poster tried to tell me that coyotes don't kill cats, but they do. Absolutely.
    In the UK there is no fear of predation though, which I've always had trouble wrapping my head around.
     
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  14. ribbon

    ribbon Resident idiot

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    @Shane Kent I seriously think your ginger cat and my ginger boy (Jerry) were separated at birth!

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  15. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Good posts @O2.0 :)

    Yes unfortunately I know that coyotes kill cats :( I have relatives who live near Tahoe, California and I remember the occasion when one of their indoor cats escaped from the house due to one of the young kids leaving the back door ajar. No-one realised the cat had got out so off they all went, out for the day, unworried. When they got home that evening they found the remains of their poor cat near their home. It was the work of coyotes, there were many of them in the area.

    True, there is no fear of cats being predated by wild animals in the UK because we wiped out all our carnivore predators years ago, except for foxes. Foxes would attack a kitten or an elderly cat (my neighbour's elderly cat where I lived before was killed by a fox) but not a healthy adult cat.
     
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  16. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @ribbon, I think my ginger boy (Ben) looks like Shane's ginger cat too. :D



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  17. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    We don't have natural predators.

    We have humans and cars who can kill a cat.

    I really struggle to understand how anyone can allow any animal out into the dangerous World to take care of itself and make rational decisions.

    Animals can't do that. If a cat gets killed, who is really to blame?
     
  18. ribbon

    ribbon Resident idiot

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    He does!! We have triplet cats :D
     
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  19. spotty cats

    spotty cats PetForums VIP

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    Being in a country where everything will kill you, it’s not really a safe option for any of us to be roaming outside ;)

    Some areas have indoor/enclosed laws, there’s also education on good cats play at home. We can thankfully trap roaming cats, should there be an irresponsible neighbour.
     
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  20. 1CatOverTheLine

    1CatOverTheLine PetForums Member

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    @chillminx - There are a number of documented cases of badgers getting the best of adult cats, including one particularly grim video online - and in snowy winters, foxes will attack adults cats as well, though not always with the best of results. Likewise, in Great Britain - as with here in the States - cats are under constant threat from above, in the form of raptors. Even according the European Eagle Owl non-indigenous status as a migratory avian (known to take prey as large as deer fawns), that leaves Goshawks and Barn Owls - both of which will happily take full-grown hares, and to the north, Golden Eagles, known to take full-grown deer, and White-Tailed Eagles - capable and formidable hunters indeed, even if generally more inclined toward the seafood side of the menu.

    In Northumberland as of mid-January, three mated pair of Lynx are destined for the Kielder Forest Plantation, in the hope that they'll multiply and control the overpopulation of deer. Throw in the sole poisonous snake - the Adder - and the introduction of the Japanese Hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica) - which is now wreaking havoc throughout France (8 deaths this year, I believe - and to a ten pound cat, a single sting can be fatal, owed to the unique neurotoxin Mandaratoxin), though no live specimens yet confirmed in the U.K. but a deceased specimen having been found at the Portsmouth Dockyard this Summer past, and I'd be inclined toward curtailing any cat's sojourns beyond the safety of a screened porch. Even a non-lethal bite from another cat, a roaming dog, or smaller animal can prove fatal if left untended or unnoticed.

    Leaving aside all the rest, mosquitoes, ticks and fleas abound, and untreated or misdiagnosed Feline Heartworm is generally fatal. It's owed to the sum of all these dangers that Cat Shelters here not only require contracts signed stipulating that adopted cats will be kept strictly indoors for the duration of their Lives, but some shelters are now suing for the return of adopted cats whose owners even so much as walk them outdoors on leashes:

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/busines...man-her-cat/Txs0L8dLqOJ1FbvLC172YP/story.html

    TL / DR: There are ten carnivores in Great Britain capable of killing adult cats.

    Both the Scottish Wildcat and Balrog were intentionally left off the above list.
    .
     
    #60 1CatOverTheLine, Jan 12, 2019 at 6:35 AM
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019 at 6:43 AM
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