Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Importance of drop

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by jjmc, Apr 15, 2011.


  1. jjmc

    jjmc PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2011
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    1
    Day before yesterday while playing with Ted I got him to understand that if you drop something you get a treat. Worked fine, each time he returned with the toy he got his treat. Was a lovely feeling :)

    Yesterday while standing in the garden with some friends having a smoke, Ted was lolling around in typical dog fashion. Then I suddenly noticed he was chewing on a medium stone, oh heck if he swallows that there'll be a ££ vet bill. Drop I said, little fella spat out he stone and ran over for his treat. Needless to say I was delighted!

    My point here is that I now know if he's chewing something he's not supposed to, and possibly something dangerous, we have an ability/opportunity to (hopefully) get him to spit it out, rather than having to get to him and remove it physically.

    I'm sure this has been covered before, but I feel it may be important to say this again, especially for first time dog owners like ourselves.
     
    #1 jjmc, Apr 15, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2011
  2. noushka05

    noushka05 Unicorn denier. Snowflake. Activist ;)

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2008
    Messages:
    26,064
    Likes Received:
    17,675
    i agree its so important to teach them this, im sure its saved me a fortune at the vets...even so they are still reluctant to drop and critters they come across, live or dead:eek:...i once had to prise the body of a rancid rat out of the jaws of one of mine when she was a youngser:arf:
     
  3. ballybee

    ballybee PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Messages:
    6,319
    Likes Received:
    577
    my aunt told me she never taught her pup(about 4 months older than Tummel) how to drop as he never ate anything(this is a lab)....in February she had to shell out £2500 for an operation to remove 2 stones from his intestine and bowel :mad: the first thing i taught Tummel was drop as he had a thing for stones....now he has a thing for sticks but doesn't eat them, just breaks them up :confused:
     
  4. lifeizsweet

    lifeizsweet PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2009
    Messages:
    10,843
    Likes Received:
    96
    We use the command 'dead' with brams which means drop what you've got in your mouth and sit/lay down until we say it's okay to move again. Really helpful on walks when he go goes exploring!
     
  5. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Messages:
    39,822
    Likes Received:
    10,365
    Teaching Leave is a really good one too, as well as Drop, that then gives you a double whammy chance then, you have a chance to get them to completely leave it first off, then the drop as a back up, if they still actually pick it up and ignore the first command.
     
  6. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,401
    Likes Received:
    29
    Yes, "belt & braces" approach makes sense if you have done the priorities and have time to proof new stuff.
    You do need to keep using everything or the commands "fade" after a while.
     
  7. tripod

    tripod PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Messages:
    1,618
    Likes Received:
    79
    Wohoo! well done jjmc and Ted :)

    Teaching a leave it cue: Essential Exercises for Cerraazzzy Canines: Good Things Come to Calm Canines | Pet Central's Pawsitive Dawgs Blog! This cue is designed to stop your dog investigating an item any further. The function of this behaviour is to teach the dog that they can't have this item (ever) and we do this by teaching them that the cue means mum/dad will allow the dog access to something better ;)

    I have always taught a drop behaviour using object exchanges (scroll down to exercise 4) . Now I still do object exchanges but also love this technique of teaching a drop cue from Chirag Patel: YouTube - Teaching Your Dog to "Drop"
    A drop cue teaches the dog to give up any item they already have and we teach them that by offering something better, and giving back the original (in training anyway).
     
  8. Helbo

    Helbo PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    Messages:
    4,164
    Likes Received:
    119
    Keep up the training - Drop and Leave are definitely handy commands, but don't be lulled into a false sense of security. When it matters are the times when they have something they think is the best thing the've ever found, and
    will be stubborn to follow you command. They'll suddenly become deaf :D
     
    RobD-BCactive likes this.
  9. Old Shep

    Old Shep PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2010
    Messages:
    3,290
    Likes Received:
    100
    Just been using Tripod's object exchange in the garden with terrific results!

    Tip has been notoriously difficult to get to drop objects (though he has been getting better the last few weeks) but he cottoned on to this right away!

    I'll do another 5-10 minutes later tonight when it's not so hot -can't believe I'm saying that, in Scotland, in April :lol:
     
  10. jjmc

    jjmc PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2011
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    1
    I agree entirely, it works with non food items he's chewing, however with food related finds I've realised it's a different story. In that instance I get close to with second favourite treat of chicken, once he gets the smell and he starts to move away I reinforce the 'drop'. I'm starting to understand the rationale behind treating up, making sure what you have, and eventually what he thinks you have, is better than what he has.

    As I've said before I'm new to this, and wow am I on an upward learning curve. Oh, and BTW I'm enjoying every minute of it. :)
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice