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Ideas on a change of word?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by rona, Jul 21, 2009.


  1. rona

    rona Guest

    Goodvic,Dundee and myself think it may help to come up with another word that people can use other than dominance, as this can be misunderstood to mean aggression.
    So any ideas of a new word
     
  2. peppapug

    peppapug PetForums Senior

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    Pushy pup

    Fiesty pup

    headstrong hound

    bossy

    challenging!!!

    A dog with character!!!


    :D
     
  3. davehyde

    davehyde Banned

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    hi rona, must be me but how can dominance be confused with aggression?
    it has been used in the dog world for ages and is a clearly defined word.

    surely it is the people that are confusing theirselves not the word itself?

    sometimes they do go hand in hand but are clearly two seperate things.

    a dominant dog is not aggressive per se and vice versa

    hunger and starvation are seperately distinct for instance

    it's like changing the english language lol.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Savahl

    Savahl Guest

    Im guessing it is because dominance is an overused word, that people dont really understand fully, for a range of unwanted doggy behaviour and by telling people they have a dominant dog, it conjures up the image that your dog is going to bite somewhere along the line!
     
  5. GoldenShadow

    GoldenShadow PetForums VIP

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    Cheeky Git

    or

    Bl**dy clever git lol
     
  6. mr.stitches

    mr.stitches PetForums VIP

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    I like feisty and headstrong personally!
     
  7. davehyde

    davehyde Banned

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    omg, feisty and headstrong are worlds away from the bahaviour you are trying to describe.

    i suggest that people TRY AND UNDERSTAND the word dominance correctly.
    not jump into re writing the dictionary because they misuse the word.

    learn and understand the word.
     
  8. Savahl

    Savahl Guest

    So explain.
    (I dont buy into the dominance theory at all)
     
  9. peppapug

    peppapug PetForums Senior

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    To try and be dominant is to be headstrong and feisty in characteristics. Help us try to understand then??????

    The dictionary definition:

    dominant
    Adjective
    1. having control, authority, or influence: a dominant leader
    2. main or chief: coal is still, worldwide, the dominant fuel
    3. Genetics (in a pair of genes) designating the gene that produces a particular character in an organism
     
  10. Savahl

    Savahl Guest

    I see dominance as the dog doesnt see you as pack leader and so attempts to take this position - headstrong/fiesty indicates stubborness rather than trying to control the pack.

    Does that make sense? I am semising :)

    But then again I think dominance exist between dogs and within a pack but does not transcend into the human/dog relationship - problems arise through lack of boundries or consistency (or of course negative past experiance) which causes conflict and confusion rather than the dog attempting to control the "pack".
     
  11. Change it oe dress it up as much as you like! Pointless really as it will still mean the same.
    DT
     
  12. rona

    rona Guest

    But dogs can be dominant with each other but not with humans surely?
    I'm not saying to stop using it for dog to dog interaction
     
  13. Oblada

    Oblada Guest

    I see dominance as the ability to direct behaviour/impose rules.

    I see dominance as quite a natural process; in any group, pack, society some sort of order is necessary - rules and boundaries. The ones who are in control of the rules dominate - whether they have the "personality" usually associated with dominance (headstrong, forceful etc) is quite irrelevant.

    The way I see it is that dogs (animals in general - that that includes us actually most of the time ;)) need leadership - rules and boundaries - dogs need their owner to dominate, to control the situation and if the owner does not then the dog may feel his only option to "remedy" this unstable state (leader-less ;)) is to control/make the rules himself.

    I do not believe that dogs will most of the time actively TRY TO DOMINATE - i believe it is mostly a last resort type of thing, when the owner has failed to provide consistent leadership.
    Dominance is not aggression, dominance is just a necessary state of affairs; someone has to be in charge to some extent.
     
  14. davehyde

    davehyde Banned

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    i have been scouring the global net to find out where feisty and headstrong = dominance.

    ppl please there is no room for personal interpretation of the meaning of words in the english language.

    they mean what they mean. use a thesarus to find SIMILAR AND DISSIMILAR words, synonyms and antonyms.

    but whatever the word you cant have a presonal interpretation and not the proper one.

    if i decided dry meant covered in water you would all laugh but it is my personal meaning, does that make it right?
     
  15. peppapug

    peppapug PetForums Senior

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    Ok, this is what dominant means

    The dictionary definition:

    dominant
    Adjective
    1. having control, authority, or influence: a dominant leader
    2. main or chief: coal is still, worldwide, the dominant fuel
    3. Genetics (in a pair of genes) designating the gene that produces a particular character in an organism

    I am sure no one is really trying to change the oxford dictionary definition, just having a play with it ;)
     
  16. davehyde

    davehyde Banned

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    yep, nowhere there does it use the words cruelty or aggression.
     
  17. Natik

    Natik PetForums VIP

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    its not really the word the problem, and doesnt matter into what u change it.....the issue is how some people are trying to put down a lack of training onto dominance or how they try to achieve being the "dominant" one.....
     
  18. peppapug

    peppapug PetForums Senior

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    I don't believe dominance is cruelty or aggression. I am the leader of my dogs ie dominant over their status. i am neither cruel or aggressive.

    I think we will all be clear on the word very soon :rolleyes:
     
  19. Savahl

    Savahl Guest

    Buster looks to me for leadership, in that i tell him what behaviour is acceptable, and I control the resources - however i do not see this as dominance over my dog. I see this as set rules and boundries regarding acceptable behaviour and manners. At no point do I see him as being submissive to me, or me dominating him.

    I dont think the point of changing the word used is because dominance means cruelty or aggression, but because it is so overused and mostly misunderstood, that these are often the image conjurred up by people when the words "your dog is being dominant" are used. So using a different word removes this link.
     
  20. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    You cant change the word - dominant just means naturally wanting to be in charge (usually in a good way). The clash comes when two people/animals are equally dominant and neither will give way to the other.
     
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