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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Polly cat has today been diagnosed with Hyperthyroidism. I have been given 2 weeks worth of Felimazole to give her then if her symptoms improve she will either carry on the tablets for life or we can have an operation. I have searched on here and read a couple of threads (bit worried about some of the side effects of the tablets now though) but can't find any info on the actual operation. The vet said Polly was only early stages, her symptoms are drinking a little more than usual and her heart rate was raised a little. I only took her to the vet because I thought something wasn't quite right with her behaviour in that she was hiding away sometimes and not coming in for breakfast straight away in the morning when usually she is waiting for me as soon as I get up. She seems a little depressed. Does anyone know how this disease would make a cat feel in themselves?
 

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One of my elderly cats had the operation. I had this done because she hated taking tablets and I thought that it would be better for her.
The operation was a success and she never had any side effects from it.
It was the best thing for her.
After she had the op, the vet did another blood test to see if it had worked and luckily it did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thankyou for your reply. Was your vet able to feel the enlarged gland in your cat as my vet cannot feel anything and has said the operation would be exploratory to see if the gland was enlarged. Also you say the vet did another blood test to see if it had worked, does it not always cure it then?
 

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Thankyou for your reply. Was your vet able to feel the enlarged gland in your cat as my vet cannot feel anything and has said the operation would be exploratory to see if the gland was enlarged. Also you say the vet did another blood test to see if it had worked, does it not always cure it then?
I am not sure.
It was a few years ago.
may be you could google all about the op.
Or ask your vet.
My cat has now sadly passed away but for her the op was good. She died through age related things and not thyroid trouble.
I hope someone on here can help and give you some advice.
 

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My cat Heinz who is 16 also has hyperthyroidism and will be going in for surgery mid November time. It's called a thyroidectomy, maybe searching 'thyroidectomy cat' will give you better Google results (including some videos if you can stomach it)

You want to ensure that the vet you choose to preform the surgery has a good success rate. It's a simple procedure, just fiddly, making sure they don't cut the tiny parathyroid glands. Although dealing with a hypothyroid cat is way easier than a hyper one as the tablets have less side effects.

With the surgery you have the option of removing one or both of the thyroid glands. If only one has the tumor on it, you could just opt for removing the one, but what can happen is that later on, maybe in a year or so the tumor can start to develop on the other gland and you would need to chose surgery again or tablets. One of the vets at my practice who is a small animal surgery specialist likes to remove both lobes at the same time, thus ensuring that the cat is completely cured.
Once the cat has had the surgery they can go home. What you must look out for is twitching of the ears. That means that the cat is having a seizure and must be rushed back to the vets. When the glands are removed it's likely that the cat will go hypo for a while until the other thyroid glands in their chest kick in. Money wise it's costing me £500 for the procedure. But if you think about how much all the blood tests cost and tablets, it's economically better, plus your cat can return to her normal healthy self.

What you would want to do is start the tablets (Felimazole, not Vidalta) if you get Vidalta don't give it to your cat, but ask for Felimazole instead. Start at 1.25mg every 12 hours. Get a blood test after 3-4 weeks to see how far the medication has lowered her T4, then adjust the dose if needed. You'll find that once on medication and her T4 is at a good level, she will be able to gain weight, and her heart rate will return to normal. Starting at a low dose ensures that you don't turn her hypothyroid with an overdose of medication, or risk damaging the kidneys, it also helps with avoiding some of the possible stomach issues.

The vet who we spoke to said it's best to get the surgery done when the cat is still healthy. Heinz was diagnosed in April. I wanted to wait a little while for his body to heal and gain some muscle weight back on before he underwent surgery.

There is a great yahoo group full of experts in hyperthyroid cats. I'd recommend you join. feline-hyperT : A support list for people whose cats have been diagnosed as hyperthyroid (hypothyroid also welcome).
 

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My Polly cat has today been diagnosed with Hyperthyroidism. I have been given 2 weeks worth of Felimazole to give her then if her symptoms improve she will either carry on the tablets for life or we can have an operation. I have searched on here and read a couple of threads (bit worried about some of the side effects of the tablets now though) but can't find any info on the actual operation. The vet said Polly was only early stages, her symptoms are drinking a little more than usual and her heart rate was raised a little. I only took her to the vet because I thought something wasn't quite right with her behaviour in that she was hiding away sometimes and not coming in for breakfast straight away in the morning when usually she is waiting for me as soon as I get up. She seems a little depressed. Does anyone know how this disease would make a cat feel in themselves?
Well, in the case of my two they both were eating enormously, crying for food when they had just been fed - also they lost weight despite eating more, coats started to look a bit greasy and unkempt. Another thing was that they became over-active, the 17-year-old was jumping from the table to the work surface if there was food to be had. One was eventaully on 12.5 mg Felimazole per day and it did not help -- at 17 she was too old for an op. The other was on 10mg a day and it suited him fine and controlled the condition for the rest of his life. There were no side effects in either. If the cat is still middle-aged or less, an op is a consideration but I would not have put my old girl thro it at her age, plus she HATED being away from home. There is also irradiated iodine but I believe tere are only five places in the country that do it and it has to cost a bomb.
Sometimes the tumour (it's not malignant) grows other than on the thyroid, it can be in the chest cavity for example and that is when it is hard to treat apparently (according to my vet).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thankyou, your replies have answered my questions. Polly is only 12 years old so hopefully has quite a few years left in her yet. She has not lost hardly any weight and is not ravenous for food. The vet said her levels were very low, borderline, so we have caught it early. I will carry on with the tablets and see how she goes.
 
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