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hyperthyrodism and incontinence

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by dartie, Oct 10, 2013.


  1. dartie

    dartie PetForums Newbie

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    Hello everyone. i am so distressed. My beautiful 13 year old siamese tabby cross who has been a wonderful companion, was diagnosed with hyperthyrodism about 2 years ago. This lead to an op to remove his tyroid glands. Ever since then, he has been peeing occasionally in the house which is so unlike him as he's been a very clean cat in the past. All seemed to calm down until symptoms started recurring. The vet says he has etopic thyroid material which is causing the same problem. Along with this, he has had chronic diarrhea since July. The vet said this could be due to the thyroid condition or another underlying cause. He is on tablets and kaolin and is very distressed about taking them. He runs away when I open the pill box. Now he has started pooing around the house as well as in the tray and recently in the kitchen sink - yak! Also, peeing in places in the house. He is having a scan tomorrow to see if he has IBS or a tumour. Can anyone suggest what to do? I am shutting the kitchen door at night but he is doing it in the day as well. Help!!
     
  2. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Hi Dartie, welcome to the Forum:) I am sorry to hear your lovely cat is having problems. As he has had chronic diarrhoea this will certainly be a contributory factor in him toiletting away from the litter tray. He associates the litter tray with pain or discomfort so he looks for somewhere else to toilet, poor fellow.

    Diarrhoea can be a symptom of hyperthyroid disease, so it is possible that is the cause of your cat's chronic diarrhoea.

    I very much hope the scan finds he does NOT have a tumour. If the scan
    finds signs of IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) which some cats do suffer from, then it is possible to manage this with a special diet.. (a scan would not find IBS as with IBS being a functional disorder it is not visible on scan or xray, and in any case it's very rare for cats to suffer from it).

    Meanwhile, what are you feeding him? To try and manage the diarrhoea feed him a diet of poached chicken, with some of the nice poaching water (keep the rest in the fridge, to serve next day. Skim off the fat first.). Do not give him anything else to eat. After a day or 2 his stools should have firmed up, and if so you could gradually transfer him to something safe such as Royal Canin Sensitivity Control, as this is a complete food whereas chicken is not.

    Has he been treated with antibiotics since the weeing and pooing away from the tray began? You mention he is taking "tablets" - what are these? If they are by chance "metronidazole" they will taste very nasty to a cat, and could be what is upsetting him. It is best to grind the tablets up and put the contents inside an empty capsule and pop it (them) straight down his throat so he can't taste it. You can buy the empty capsules on line.

    empty capsules | eBay

    Make sure you get the right size capsules - they're numbered from 00 to 3 with size 00 being the largest and size 3 the smallest. If I recall correctly I used to use Size 2 when I was medicating one of my cats.

    Use 2 capsules if the powder won't fit in one capsule, the important thing is to get the capsule down the cat's throat without it getting stuck. Always give tablets and capsules before food so you can be sure they have gone down.

    As there is a chance the diarrhoea is being caused by the HyperT, then it may be very difficult to resolve until the thyroid disease is under control. As surgery is not possible to remove ectopic tissue, I assume the vet has put him on the drug Felimazole or similar?

    I would put down a few extra litter trays for him at the moment and use a nice soft litter such as Cats Best Oko Plus. This may encourage him to use the trays more. It's worth a try anyway.

    Please let us know how things go with the scan results etc?
     
  3. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    I'm not sure if the radioactive iodine is an option at his age or not. If it is, it will deal with the ectopic thyroid and is often a better though more expensive treatment choice than surgery because of that, plus there is no anasthetic risk or risk of damaging other structures - the iodine is administered as an injection.
     
  4. dartie

    dartie PetForums Newbie

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    thank you Chillminx and Oriental Slave - you have really encouraged me. He went for the scan Friday which showed some thickening of the small intestine (about 1mm) but as you say, it was not conclusive and the vet suggested trying the Hills DD diet (wow - how expensive is that!!!). Since then, the diarrhea seems to have calmed down and today it is much more solid. At the moment, he's taking felimazole 2.5mg tablets twice a day and kaogel which I'm gradually reducing. He's not too bad swallowing the tablet but hates the kaogel - its' stressing him out and me!! We've put another tray down in one place where he's soiled and he's using it. I thought all was going well until I caught him weeing on the bedroom floor this morning. It's so upsetting. Have you any thoughts on how the Royal Canin Sensitivity Control compares to the Hills diet? Both our cats get really fussy when they have the same flavour food every day and then won't eat.:)
     
  5. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Dartie, I assume your vet had put your cat on Hills D/D diet because he/she thinks your cat may have a food intolerance or allergy. Hills contains venison and for most cats that will be a "novel protein", i.e. a protein they have not eaten before.

    Hills D/D is not so expensive if you buy in bulk on line. Here is one example:

    CATS - ALL CAT FOOD - HILLS PET NUTRITION CAT FOOD - HILLS PRESCRIPTION DIET CAT - D/D - Vetmedsdirect.co.uk

    If you shop around you may find it even cheaper still, and with free delivery in some cases.

    It could be your vet has put your cat on what is known as an "elimination diet". If so he should have explained it properly to you.

    Following an elimination diet means the cat eats only that one food, nothing else for 6 weeks apart from drinking water. Then if the diarrhoea has completely settled you gradually re-introduce single protein foods at the rate of one new one every 2 weeks. and keep a daily log of symptoms.

    Single protein foods to re-introduce might be chicken, lamb, turkey, pork, beef, but the important thing is there MUST be only ONE of those meat proteins in each food you re-introduce. This means ruling out all the cheap and cheerful supermarket foods as they all contain more than one protein, and most contain some % of beef even if they say e.g. "chicken" on the packet/tin.

    In answer to your question about Royal Canin - it would not be suitable at this particular stage to give your cat Sensitivity Control (or any other RC foods) as they are not "novel protein foods", although some are single protein e.g. chicken.

    Ropocat make venison novel protein canned food, which would certainly be cheaper than Hills D/D, but I would not advise switching between one and the other whilst your cat is on an elimination diet. Either stick to the Hills DD for 6 wks, or use just Ropocat instead.

    http://www.happykittycompany.co.uk/collections/cat-food/products/ropocat-sensitive-gold-chicken-400g
     
  6. lostbear

    lostbear Bear right at Newcastle . . .

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    Our cat had hyperthyroidism and had her thyroid removed, and she was also doubly incontinent - I just thought it was old age. I had no idea it was related to her overactive thyroid condition! (Wouldn't have made any difference - we would still have kept her, but I like to know these things.

    For six years the house stank because she peed all over, and when she tried to use her tray she often missed, and her poo was liquid - just squirted out of her.

    She wasn't unwell at all though, and was active and happy.
     
  7. dartie

    dartie PetForums Newbie

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    Hi - thanks for your replies. The vet didn't say anything about an elimination diet or food allergy or intolerance. She suggested trying a change of diet to see if it made any difference. Also, I understand it has a high fat content and he is very thin so I thought it would help him to put on a bit of weight. Unfortunately, he fell on it to start with and now doesn't want to eat it! The diarrhea improved after having been starved for the scan but is now back again and our other cat has got it too now which makes me wonder if it is viral as well as thyroid. I'm having to shut doors to stop him going into rooms without my supervision but also giving him lots of cuddles and reassurance. Any other suggestions? I think I will have to go back to previous wet food as he doesn't want to eat. Is the Hills diet for thyroid any good?:confused:
     
  8. Paddypaws

    Paddypaws PetForums VIP

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    I would not use the Hills Thyroid food personally....the dry has absolutely NO meat at all, and while the wet contains some....many cats will not eat it.
     
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