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Hunting Instinct

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by RachyBobs, May 13, 2010.


  1. RachyBobs

    RachyBobs PetForums VIP

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    Do you think you can ever learn a dog to not do this at a older age? Only reason I ask is Blush is fine with my hens (they roam free round my yard) Hattie on the other hand cant help her self and has to chase and grab them and while she grabs them they die of shock :( Someone asked me if I could ever learn her to not do this but I have tried and it just doesnt work.. its there and its there to stay. :confused:
     
  2. LostGirl

    LostGirl PetForums VIP

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    You can teach anything really i guess

    Im no expert but i guess i would properly do a long line, when shes trying to chase the chickens, recall her back or use a sound to get her attention i.e. a shout/whistle/rattle and then treat her when she comes back.

    I doubt it would ever go away as such, but you could get her to think twice about it, it would mean always watching over her near chickens e.t.c
     
  3. Phoenix&Charlie'sMum

    Phoenix&Charlie'sMum PetForums VIP

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    I wish I knew too!!

    My Charlie, 5 year old Saluki X Grey was used as a Hare Coursing dog, so now when we go out he's "on the hunt" all the time and when we let him off lead he zooms off 2 fields ahead!

    We had a professional trainer in and he is helping us with his recall and we have to train the STOP command so that he doesnt run so far away.

    His recall is getting better, his stop is slightly better but his "on the hunt" mode I dont think will ever go away. Im thinking of getting those bungee type leads as I feel like my arms are growing inches every time I walk him! :lol:
     
  4. catz4m8z

    catz4m8z PetForums VIP

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    I think its trickier when something is there all the time. You could work on it tons but then they have constant temptation around.:( I never have stopped Adam bullying the cats. Maybe if I just had 1 or 2 it would be controllable but 9 constantly running in front of his path is difficult to manage..
     
  5. billyboysmammy

    billyboysmammy PetForums VIP

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    I think JSR managed (with the help of a behaviourist - i think) to teach one of hers with a high prey drive to stop chasing sheep in the field next to her house. Hopefully she will see this and can comment.

    I would say that yes you can train it, but it would be a very very long process and your not going to get instant results, unless you resort to pain causing methods such as the horrible shock collars.
     
  6. JSR

    JSR PetForums VIP

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    Depends on the dog, your dedication and luck. Sidney killed 2 lambs nearly 2 years ago. He had previously killed 2 of my parents chicken's, I put that down to him wanting to 'play' with them...wish I known it was an indication of a high prey drive and I'd have been much less carefree with my attitude towards him off lead!!! The lambs he killed had got into a friends fields so legally I wasn't responsible for the attack, but the fact he did not recall instantly (which he always had done previously!!) and he went from breaking the neck of one lamb straight to the other, before turning on the mother, I knew I had a major problem on my hands!!!! It took me 2 hours to get him back to me, luckily the mother escaped the field but he was in such a hyper state he'd lost all sense of himself and had in a sense turned wild!!!!

    After the attack he was so bad he would start bouncing if he heard bleating even if he was inside the house!!! I live extreamly rurally and my house is surrounded by fields and obviously sheep so this was a major issue.

    I had to do something and the only course of action was training. I had the help of an experienced working dog trainer who trained Sidney to work. This way harnessing his natural chase instinct but controlling it. He did use a harsh method intially, nothing physical but he removed Sidney from me and used his voice and presence to I guess scare Sidney into responding. Not something I would allow to be done lightly but it really was a matter of life or death because I know if he got into any land locally he would absolutely be shot with no hesitation. I also used Sidney's ball obsession in my favour, this was his reward and distraction from anything I didn't want him to react to.

    It took 8 months of bloody hard work but I can now safely walk him off lead through live stock, I even ride with him running along side through the sheep fields at the yard and he doesn't look at them.

    I believe you can train it out of a dog but you have to be consistant, dedicated and expect the worst. Not all will respond in the manner wanted, I was very lucky as Sidney is a very intelligent dog with a high play motivation and need to please. I would never ever allow him off lead amoungst lambs now but I do trust his training to know he'll return when in with sheep or cattle.
     
  7. katiefranke

    katiefranke PetForums VIP

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    thats quite amazing JSR - i can imagine how much work you have had to put in to reach this stage [I was looking for an icon to insert here to show 'bowing down' in respect but couldnt find one :D ]

    what breed/mix is sidney?
     
  8. JSR

    JSR PetForums VIP

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    Oh believe me there were ALOT of tears!!! He's a Standard Poodle x Bedlington so beddy instinct and poodle intelligence!! Luckily he is a quick learner, but it's meant alot of recall training, ball motivational games to distract him and me being hard with the one dog I've always mothered abit too much!!!! I thought the idea of training him to hunt was insane when the trainer suggested it but it makes sense to use his natural ability but harness it so he is controlled. Obviously I don't work him but the training removed his want to chase and replaced it with a want to run...if that makes sense?

    This article is pretty much the basics of the training we used. It started off very simple but works up to controlled working outside of a controlled area.

    Chasing Cars, Cats, Joggers, etc by Perfect Paws Dog and Puppy Training
     
  9. Snoringbear

    Snoringbear PetForums VIP

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    Thanks for the link. One of my ddb has gotten worse with cats in the past couple of weeks. It's like she's hunting them - peering under parked cars, over walls etc.
     
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