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How to teach ignore ill behaved dogs?

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Avik, Jun 13, 2017.


  1. Avik

    Avik PetForums Newbie

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    Hi, my dog is about 2 years old maleobedient very nice border collie. He wants to play with children and dogs. Have no behaviour problem. Only problem I face is when he comes across another dog who is showing nervousness. That time my dog gets excited when leads to a bitter situation.
     
  2. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    The question you need to pose is "Do all other children and dogs want to play with him?"

    Do you consult the children, their parents or the owners of the other dog?

    Many dogs are not interested in other dogs, many owners do not want their dogs to interact with other dogs for all sorts of reasons.

    If your dog is obedient then surely he will come when you recall him from such dogs as soon as you see there may be a problem surely?
     
  3. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    What actually happens when he meets a nervous dog, is he on or off lead, and why can't you just call him away? If he doesn't respond to your call, he DOES have a behaviour problem.
     
  4. Avik

    Avik PetForums Newbie

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    Yes, yes, is that a statement or question?
     
  5. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    If your dog is obedient and comes when called, surely there cannot be a problem?
     
  6. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    I wouldn't be allowing your dog to approach nervous or reluctant dogs.

    Some dogs don't want to socialise with others and may feel the need to try and see your dog off.
     
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  7. Avik

    Avik PetForums Newbie

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    My dog is on lead because I can't trust him yet. He may not come back when called in presence of other dogs. Particularly if other dog is showing negative signs.
    I have consulted a famous trainer. She taught some basic tricks, then before going said he is excitable so needs to be neutered. But when she was discussing, said neutering is not for fearful dogs. And then when she tested with a dummy dog said my dog is unsure so may be acting this way.
    Then when I said I am not willing to neuter she said atleast use implant to make testicles small. The way she is pushing, seems she has some target. By the way she was recommended by the vets.
     
  8. ouesi

    ouesi Guest

    I'm not sure I fully understand what you're asking.
    So when your dog meets a nervous dog, he bites the other dog? Or they just don't get along?
    If your dog is on lead, how is he able to approach nervous dogs?
     
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  9. Avik

    Avik PetForums Newbie

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    Yes, it's bit difficult to explain. My dog is on lead when ever in presence of unknown dogs.
    Next, he need not approach. The presence of a nervous dog who is staring at him is enough to show his teeth, growl and try to lunge. I have to hold on to lead with strength and pull him away far from the other dog. Couple of times there had been cases when my dog could come close to such a "staring" dog. He did not bite but the sight of teeth showing and barking scares the other owner.
    I want to teach my dog to ignore the staring and save myself such embarrassing moments.
     
  10. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    As soon as another dog starts staring at him, turn round and walk in the opposite direction. This not only breaks eye contact, but also gives your dog confidence that you are in charge of the situation and won't let anything happen to him.
    Using a walking belt (on you) gives you much better control as you can use your whole body weight rather than mainly just your arms/shoulders; and having a head collar on the dog also gives more control. Most people recommend Dogmatic head collars.
     
  11. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Three questions followed by a statement!
     
  12. Avik

    Avik PetForums Newbie

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    Okay. I thought so. Was thinking if there is some way other than using tools. My dog hates the head halter. He doesn't mind the halti harness.
     
  13. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    You don't have to use a head collar...the advice is still the same...turn away, walk in another direction.
     
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  14. Avik

    Avik PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks. Pity that my little boy can't play free with his friends. Early morning he runs free playing fetch with me when there are no dogs around. Evening he is on lead when there are many dogs. Late at night I again. Take him to walk and sniff freely before sleep. Don't know if this is enough to allow his development.
     
  15. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Dogs do not need friends...

    If more people understood having a dog neutral dog, one which doesn't really care about other dogs is best then it would be far better.

    Dogs develop relationships with us, and that's the main thing.
     
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  16. Avik

    Avik PetForums Newbie

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    What about the big fuss I hear that I didn't properlysocialise my dog as a puppy? The trainer suggests castrate and that will solve every problem. The way she is pushing, makes me disbelieve her. She comes every time with expensive buying proposals. I have bought most things but to put my little boy under knife when am not sure.....
     
  17. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    You have misinterpreted socialisation...it's ok most people do.

    My vet says your puppy needs socialising with people, dogs, cows and horses all the same way. Are you stupid enough to run with your puppy in to a field of cows so he or she can 'socialise' with them...or let your dog run up to a horse in a field and sniff the horse all over? No because it would be ridiculous and dangerous.

    Socialisation is getting your dog and puppy used to your environment..this can include going on buses and trains. Which yes there will no doubt be dogs. However a dog needs to understand that all dogs should be left alone, unless told otherwise. Only the wise let dogs play with others, and that would be dogs they have known for years not some they see regularly on a dog walk.

    The aim of dog on dog socialisation is your dog should be indifferent to other dogs, they should care about other dogs. They are just part and parcel of being in the environment.

    Exposure to other dogs as a puppy, can make dogs one or two things. One, a dog who is so desperate to play with others that they are a 'singing' nightmare on the lead or two one that's been so overwhelmed by meeting dogs, hasn't learnt anything positive from the experience and can be a nervous wreck around others, and also maybe 'singing' well on a lead. Neither are fun, but both look unfriendly to those who do not understand dogs.

    Who is this trainer you use? Surely she explained socialisation properly to you.
     
  18. Avik

    Avik PetForums Newbie

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    You talk common sense which I gave up listening to "experts". At 6 months age, I used to walk my pup around a park with dogs children playing in. No risk of contact. But then some expert came in asked I am all wrong should let my dog play offlead. I would not name the trainer as she doesn't look to be taking contradiction lightly. No, she didn't explain anything about socializing like you did.
    So how do I erase the board and start again? By the way I have 1st category dog now. Wants to play with all.
     
  19. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Playing offlead would have been fine, but you need to be the centre of attention. So things like hide and seek with your dog, and lots of recall practice would have been fabulous.

    Am sure you can put things right, you just need to reign everything in a bit.

    What's your dog motivated to do things by, food, toys?
     
  20. Avik

    Avik PetForums Newbie

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    Ball, the tug, chasing me, then boiled turkey if he skips a meal. Should I keep taking him out only at odd hours when no one is around?
     
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