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How to feed treats to dog without sore fingers?!!!!

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by smudgebiscuit, Nov 23, 2012.


  1. smudgebiscuit

    smudgebiscuit PetForums Member

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    Hi all,

    Am i going to get laughed off this forum for asking this?:p

    We've decided to have zero tolerance to Molly's persistent pulling on lead and therefore spending several sessions per day walking-stopping-treating and my fingers are killing me!:eek: Usually she takes treats from the front but when we are walking my hand is kind of palm, thumb and finger facing her mouth and they are getting really sore.....any tips please :)
     
  2. JAChihuahua

    JAChihuahua PetForums VIP

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    I remember doing this with our dogs when I was a kid to stop them pulling. You drop the treat on the floor just in front of her. That way she realises that sticking near your legs is a good thing and she is more interested in seeing what and when you will drop the next treat than pulling like a train, and for you it will save your fingers.

    I hope its ok for me to post this? I'm a complete newB and have my first puppy since being a teen (now grown up with 2 beautiful children and a hubby who is more like child number 3). Maybe its not done that way anymore?
     
  3. Holtie

    Holtie PetForums VIP

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    Not at all!

    I had this with my younger ESS. I resorted to wearing an old washing up glove and she didn't like the feel or taste of it so ended up taking the treat more gently. Worked for me. :) I also tried the wooden spoon method - smeared some long lasting liver paste on it and it worked for a while but she turned it in to a game of grabbing it! :eek: So put a stop to that! :)
     
  4. Ploppy

    Ploppy PetForums Member

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    We had this problem with Dana in the beginning (and occasionally still do when she's excited.)

    We managed to get rid of the problem by sitting down with a handful of small treats no bigger than 1 centimeter in size, like a kibble size, and feeding her them all.

    The catch is that she only gets it if she moves her head towards the treat slowly and takes it without touching skin.
    If she moves too fast, we pull the hand away.
    If she touches skin, we pull away before she gets a grip on it.



    It took her about 10 minutes to figure out what was going on, and after a week she was getting good at it.

    When feeding them to her we used "take it nice" followed by praise if she took it gently.



    As for moving and treating, I tend not to do it. Treats are handed to her in the regular between-thumb-and-finger fashion. So if I give her a treat I stop walking and hand it to her. Doesn't slow us down very much since she can still chew and walk :D


    PS. Love the idea about randomly dropping treats beside you, will need to see how that affects Dana's walking :D
     
    #4 Ploppy, Nov 23, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2012
  5. smudgebiscuit

    smudgebiscuit PetForums Member

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    Hahahaha rubber golve! could just imagine me walking down the street in yellow marigolds :p Neighbours already think i'm a loony for wearing a head torch :eek:
     
  6. Corinthian

    Corinthian PetForums Member

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    I just make a fist and offer it on a flat palm.
     
  7. Dogless

    Dogless PetForums VIP

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    How about using a tube of liver paste or Primula?
     
  8. smudgebiscuit

    smudgebiscuit PetForums Member

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    we used to use Primula before we discovered her allergies. didn't know they did liver paste in a tube and also would have to be chicken liver paste as she has allergies to beef,pork & lamb-just going to Google some and find out what's in it!!

    Thanks :D
     
  9. springerpete

    springerpete PetForums VIP

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    I might get hung out to dry for this but here goes.
    I wouldn't give treats in this situation, it seems to me that the dog pulls on the lead, you stop and give a treat, it may well give the dog the idea that.'' I tug, we stop and I get rewarded, so lets pull again'' I simply stop when the dog starts to tug, wait a few seconds then start again, the dog usually learns that tugging is only going to delay him getting to where he wants to go. it's a common fault with springers, they just want to be following their noses, so I do sympathise with you.
     
  10. smudgebiscuit

    smudgebiscuit PetForums Member

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    Thanks springer Pete,

    I too have thought if we are rewarding her for bad behaviour but so far so good we do seem to be making progress. But think it's mainly due to us-started making sure we don't let her pull under any circumstances i.e. going out the front door, getting to the car etc. We make her walk nicely before she is let go to have a snuffle and we use a specific 'off you go' command for this and when we are wanting her to walk nicely again we use 'heel' and then off we trot. Kind of known all along it's us not being consistent with her but she is a determined puller.:rolleyes:
     
  11. Jenny Olley

    Jenny Olley PetForums VIP

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    Sounds like you are making good progress, if a little painful.

    I would look at stopping the mugging/grabbing away from teaching heel work, so just do it as an exercise.

    A lot of dogs who mug/grab just think it is ok, they have no idea its not what we want.

    We have found with some dog, yelping like you would to stop puppy nipping (and of course not releasing the teat), doesn't work for all dogs.

    Good luck with whatever you try.
     
  12. Ploppy

    Ploppy PetForums Member

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    I forgot to say, as for heel training, I do this kind of thing.
    Whether it be in the house with a toy, park with a stick/toy, street with a post box, etc.
    Seems to work a bit.

    More importantly, it removes the decision as to whether treating after pulling to get her close is a going to be good or bad for the training.

    Dog Training Made Easy: Stop pulling on the lead - Part 11/25 - YouTube
     
    #12 Ploppy, Nov 25, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2012
  13. springerpete

    springerpete PetForums VIP

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    Hi Smudgebiscuit,
    You have my sympathies. After years of working spaniels I know what a trial they can be when walking on the lead, my youngster is fine on the rare occasions that I walk him in town, but in the countryside the little toad will still tug on the lead to get to an '' Interesting'' smell.
    Good luck with it, trust me, their little foibles are more than made up for by their charming nature. It's imposible to be glum around a springer.
     
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