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how to avoid mass destruction when i go out???

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by harrison79, Jun 8, 2010.


  1. harrison79

    harrison79 PetForums Member

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    Hi

    our pup is now 10 months old and perfectly crate trained. I recently have had to return to work full time, and although i get home at lunch to walk him i felt that leaving him in his crate was getting unfair. So we started to leave him in the kitchen out of his crate for short period like nipping to the shops etc and he was perfect. We then chanced leaving him out of his crate while were at work and again he was perfect... for the first week!!

    The second week the cat had opened the door for him and he had wrecked a few pairs of shoes, tore the stairs carpet... the next day he got out again and went on a rampage upstairs munching on the cats litter :eek6:
    So he went back to being in his crate.

    We decided to try and again this week and managed to tie the kitchen door shut so the cat couldn't open it. However the adventures of last week seems to have spoilt the perfect pooch we had in the first week. I came home to carnage this lunch time. The kitchen looked like a bomb had landed, and one of my chairs has been well and truly detroyed :(

    He has toys left for him. He has a kong which i read others swear by, but he gets everything out of it and licked clean within 15minutes no matter how well i pack it.

    He is a labXspaniel and i know that labs are well known for being destructive when bored, but surely there is something i can do?!!?!?

    Any advice would be really appreciated. He gets walked before work, walked again at lunch time, a long walk (90mins) in the evening. I just really don't want him to be crated all day when i am not there, but at the moment i can't afford to rectify all the destruction!

    thanks
     
  2. yorkiegal

    yorkiegal PetForums Newbie

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    might be a good idea to remove everything you can from the kitchen. I've taken the chairs, bin etc out so that all he has at floor level is his bowl, bed and toys. He still knocks his bowl over but he can't damage anything else. But it's a long time to leave a dog on it's own. I would never have got a puppy if I had to work full time. Sorry if that offends some people here but it's what I beleive. Perhaps he is getting bored with those toys? Maybe put some of them away and swap them about regularly so he sees them as new?
     
  3. hutch6

    hutch6 PetForums VIP

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    Nice copy and paste job but it isn't aggression, it is boredom, excessive energy and a mild bit of anxiety.

    How often is the dog walked and for how long?
    What type of exercise does the dog get on the wlk i.e. lead walk, lead running, off-leash play, training, fetch etc?
    What is the dog fed?
    Have you had the dog to training classes?
    Have you explained ot the dog what he can chew such as rawhide, nylobones etc? Perhaps get a treat ball to occupy him.
    Do you do any training with him in the room he is kept in?
    Have you tried leaving a radio on for him during the day?
     
  4. CarolineH

    CarolineH PetForums VIP

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    Hmm. Have I missed something? Why give a load of advice about aggression when this is clearly about destruction due to seperation anxiety? :confused:: :confused: :confused1:

    Ok........

    Put stuff you don't want dog to have in cupboards and up on shelves. Use child locks on cupboards and fridges etc and invest in some bitter apple or bitter lime spray (from most pet shops) to spray regularly on cupboard corners and mats etc. Get a child gate put on the doorway of the room you want to leave him in. Make a recording of your voice, (reading a book aloud is a good one) and leave it playing. Kong toys stuffed with tasty morsels (wiped on inside with marmite, peanut butter or meat paste to extend their attention holding properties!) left lying around, maybe even hidden (not too well) in corners etc.

    Dogs are dogs. They cannot do crossword puzzles or switch on a tv to amuse themselves. Therefore we have to become a) extra tidy and b) more imaginative ourselves. Prevention is better than repair. Some people find a large, secure dog run outside is better for leaving their dog in if they are out for any length of time.
     
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