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How Much is That Doggy....

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by BredaKim, Dec 4, 2007.


  1. BredaKim

    BredaKim PetForums Member

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    Tibetan_mastiffs_193764a.jpg

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    Forget Louis Vuitton handbags or Prada suits — the latest must-have accessory for China’s wealthy elite comes not from the chic designer stores of Shanghai or Beijing but from the plains of Tibet. The Tibetan mastiff, a rare, ancient and now extravagantly expensive breed of dog, has captivated those seeking to display their new-found affluence in a country experiencing a dizzying economic boom.

    China has been in the grip of a fad for all things Tibetan since the opening last year of the world’s highest railway linking Beijing and Lhasa. That has fuelled the soaring price of mastiffs, with a perfect specimen now fetching as much as £250,000 — up from just under £100 in the late 1990s.

    These huge animals, weighing up to 18st (113kg), are adapted to life in the thin air, freezing temperatures and wild mountains of Tibet, where they were domesticated 6,000 years ago, and are regarded as the oldest, biggest and fiercest domestic dog. The explorer Marco Polo described the mastiff as being as tall as a donkey and with a voice like a lion.

    Traditionally, they have served as guard dogs for nomads who leave their tents all day to follow their flocks of yaks, sheep and goats. Their bite is as fierce as their bark and visitors approach such tents with great caution.

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    But the scarcity and reputation for fearlessness, ferocity and faithfulness of the Tibetan mastiff have transformed them into a status symbol for China’s new very rich. The mastiff may not only be the most expensive dog in the world, but also among the rarest, with only 100 pure-bred animals believed to exist.

    At the annual Yushu horse-racing festival on the border between Qinghai province and Tibet, several dozen mastiffs loll on the ground on Tibetan rugs, shaded by beach umbrellas from the blazing sun. Ethnic Tibetan breeders display their finest dogs in the hope of finding a buyer among visiting Han Chinese tourists.

    Jiangyong Yixi, 16, has two dogs on display. “Chinese see these dogs as a way to show off their wealth because they are rare. Also they are extremely loyal and great guard dogs. They have no fear. They will attack a bear or a tiger to protect their owners’ herds of sheep and yaks in Tibet.” China’s nouveaux riches may not fear bear attacks but they are willing to pay top dollar for a guard dog to protect their homes in the booming cities of China’s interior. A puppy with a fine pedigree was on offer for about 30,000 yuan (£2,000) at the Yushu show.

    A grown “iron and gold” male, distinguished by its glossy black head and back and yellow-brown paws and underbelly, can fetch anything between 150,000 and 300,000 yuan. With a strong bloodline, prices of 1 million to 3 million yuan are not unusual.

    However, breeders are concerned that the market is in decline. Prices have halved in the past year. It isn’t clear whether the fashion for the dogs as status symbols is fading or whether demand has resulted in oversupply.

    Not all the dogs are for sale. Baima Dorje has a three-year-old male, Protected Secret, whose breeding is so pure and his looks so classic that the local Tibetan Mastiff Association has banned his sale. He more than earns his keep however, with breeders paying 50,000 yuan for a chance to mate their bitches with him. With a life expectancy of 20 to 30 years, Protected Secret will keep his mistress in style for quite some time.

    For yak herder Zhilang Zhibang, 24, the fuss was much ado about nothing. “What are my dogs worth?” he gestured to three animals chained to pegs around his yak hair tent in the mountains outside Yushu. “They’re worthless. They’re here to guard my home.”

    China’s top dogs

    Pekinese 500 yuan (£33)

    Dachshund 1,000 yuan

    Basset hound 3,000 yuan

    White wire fox terrier 1,500 yuan

    Pomeranian 800 yuan
     
  2. Debbie

    Debbie PetForums VIP

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    More people who need educating!! With prices like this there is no wonder money grabbers get in on the act - this is a world wide problem with no idea of how to try and put a stop to it....fashion or money its all the same to me......
     
  3. Lovely dog.........:cool:
     
  4. bullyb

    bullyb PetForums VIP

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    really nice dogs..

    i breed british bulldogs and people with lack of education think its a money making scam, WELL IT ISNT. i had 3 puppies there, and i am lucky if i broke even but that is irelevant because even if it cost me money, i would still do it to keep the breed going and to define the breed to make the perfect british bulldog.
    people dont realise the hard work,effort and expence that goes into breeding some dogs, not to mention experience and knowledge...thats why i get really angry when they start going on about breeders being in it to make money without knowing facts...if anyone want to know the facts feel free to pm me or visit my website as i have many years of experience.
     
  5. Agree - breeding novadays its just an expensive hobby.
     
  6. bullyb

    bullyb PetForums VIP

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    thanks elena for your support :) im sick and tired of people on this website going on about 'being in it for the money'.:(
     
  7. LOL - expences are too hign, cats maitanance is even higher as they do need (and use) a lots of litter. Heating, cleaning, washing....GOOD FOOD! Vaccination...Advertising. Good if you dont need a VET (but if you do - its normally something urgent on weekend's evening!) :DPeople dont realise - to breed a good looking, placid pets one have to spend-spend-spend before any baby goes to a new home.:DLuv my babies to bits!
     
  8. bullyb

    bullyb PetForums VIP

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    very true elena, bulldogs really need to be sectioned to, so if its an out of hours you can imagine the expense there??
     
  9. sallyanne

    sallyanne Guest

    Breeders who do it properly don't make any money,there lucky if they break even.

    The only ones that I see making money are PF's & BYB.
     
  10. True.:D:D:D:D:D
     
  11. bullyb

    bullyb PetForums VIP

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    yes thats true... i have one litter a year, its hard work and couldnt cope with any more often! i just broke even that time... but at the end of the day look what we produced.... good quality healthy puppies!!:D
     
  12. sallyanne

    sallyanne Guest

    I haven't bred a litter for 12 years,were planning a litter for sometime next year,our aim is to keep a pup to show & further our lines.
    It is expensive to breed,especially if things go wrong....
     
  13. bullyb

    bullyb PetForums VIP

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    yes it is, this little one had a hernia and the buyers pulled out at the last minute. we did get it fixed because i would never sell a pup that wasnt 100% but it was an extra couple of hundred. i am buying another bitch next year to change the bloodlines in mine, but the line i want are selling for 4-5k but i will pay it because its a super line. the ultimate healthy bulldog, thats my aim...:D:D
     
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