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How do you decide how to pts...

Discussion in 'Horse Health and Nutrition' started by millybultitude, May 9, 2016.


?

Which one...

  1. Bullet

    1 vote(s)
    33.3%
  2. Injection

    2 vote(s)
    66.7%
  1. millybultitude

    millybultitude PetForums Junior

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    Unfortunately my horse has been given two weeks, and although we're trying everything we can to figure out what is going wrong. I need to plan and know what will happened next.
    I've been given two ways to put him to sleep.
    Sedation in a field and then the injection way...
    or
    Bullet to the head...

    Bullet is quick and there will be no struggle, but I will never get the image out of my head of him thudding to the ground.
    Injection is what I'm leaning more towards. But people have told me they thrash around, which is what I don't want.

    I just want opinions as I know it's personal preference but I've never had to deal with anything like this before...
    I'm so sorry about this horrible post but I don't know what to do.
     

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  2. Hanwombat

    Hanwombat I ♥ dogs with eyebrows !!

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    One of my mares was PTS back in 2013.. at first we were going to have the bullet but the more we thought about it the more we thought no.

    So we decided on the injection. She was sedated in the field and then she had the injection and I must say.. she was always a proud and dignified mare and she went in the more elegant and dignified way! The drugs soon took effect and she went down as if she was going to lay down.. so we then pushed her onto her side and not long after she was gone.

    I personally couldn't have asked for a nicer death for such a beautiful mare and I miss her so much everyday.

    Very sorry that you're in this situation :( He is a gorgeous horse.
     
    COH2350 likes this.
  3. millybultitude

    millybultitude PetForums Junior

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    Thank you for your response, it's never nice talking about our beloved animals in such a way.
    I think that's what I'm leaning more towards, I want to be with him as he goes...
    I'm sorry for your loss.
    He really is ... thank you again
     
    Hanwombat likes this.
  4. Hanwombat

    Hanwombat I ♥ dogs with eyebrows !!

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    Well whatever you decide you will do whats best for him. Sorry its a horrible situation, I saw your other thread but I don't have any input I'm afraid and 7 is such a young age :( My mare who died was 30 so had lived a long life.

    Big hugs..x
     
  5. FlorayG

    FlorayG PetForums Junior

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    I've had to have 3 euthanased over the years and I always go for the bullet. It's very important though to get someone who is really experienced ( local huntsman is best, he shoots large animals every day) and I would not let a vet do it. I think the details would help you...
    I meet the huntsman with my horse in a field out of sight of other horses and pay him up front ( its currently £70 for a pony and £100 for a horse local to me). I give the huntsman the lead rope and some of my horses favourite treats and he gets to know her. He feeds her treats from a hand held low so that she lowers her head. As he lifts the gun I turn my back and when I say 'OK' there is a bang and a loud thump as the horse drops and I leave without looking back. Sometimes the horse will grunt or sigh as it drops. People who shoot horses for a living I find tend to be the type of people who really like horses for some reason - I suppose if they were unpleasant they would soon be out of business. My huntsman always cuts some tail hair off for me because I can't bear to do it while the horse is alive. He leaves the tail hair and headcollar on the fence for when I get back.
    I would never go for anasthetic because horses rely on being able to run to escape danger and I can imagine the panic a horse would feel as it lost control of its legs. Plus you hear the horror stories of it not working...
     
  6. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    An interesting post @FlorayG.
    I remembered something that happened in the fields opposite my house some years ago and thought I would post it on this thread and it seems to more or less agrees with what @FlorayG has said.
    I used to ride years ago, but have never owned a horse, just have a small amount of experience from childhood.

    In the fields opposite my house there used to be a number of polo ponies out to grass once the polo season had ended. One morning I noticed a lot of activity around a horse that looked to be down and rolling about. After a while another person arrived who I took to be the vet. For the rest of the day the vet, plus the owner and grooms worked on the horse which I began to think was suffering from colic. Eventually I think it must have got to the point where nothing further could be done and the horse was PTS using what appeared to be a bolt gun. The horse went down, but didn't seem to actually be dead and from time to time there was a bit of movement and the vet kept listening to the heart. After about half an hour he used the bolt gun again and this time it was successful thankfully.
    I hadn't really thought before about how an experienced person, used to putting down large animals, would be a better choice perhaps then the vet.
     
  7. FlorayG

    FlorayG PetForums Junior

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    Ach never trust a vet. They shot the horse and then waited 30 minutes to see if it was dead? If a huntsman did that to a deer the animal rights would be all over it. OP I hope your horse gets better, one of mine had a close escape (3 days from euthanasia) so don't give up on him yet.
     
  8. Hanwombat

    Hanwombat I ♥ dogs with eyebrows !!

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    My mare was 30 years old and had dropped fetlocks in her hind legs, thus the reason for having her PTS as she was struggling to walk. She certainly wouldn't have been able to run away and actually she was very relaxed when it happened. I think in a way she'd had enough of her old legs and just wanted to be able to run again.

    I do agree that giving a high spirited horse an injection may not be possible and the bullet would be better but in my situation the injection was definitely the right thing for my horse.
     
  9. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    I stayed with my Niece's pony when she was put down by injection.

    She was sedated first and, when the final injection was given, she simply sank down into the straw and went to sleep.

    I do believe there were some problems when this method was first introduced, but to me, it's a peaceful end and far less harrowing for the owner than a bullet.

    It is how I intend to say goodbye to my own horse when the time comes.
     
    Hanwombat likes this.
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