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Honestly can't believe what's just happened...

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Tigerneko, Sep 24, 2013.


  1. Tigerneko

    Tigerneko PetForums VIP

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    I was just walking Amber and Sadie down the street adjacent to mine, there were a bunch of children (about 9 or 10 years old) playing in the front garden of one of the houses. Just as I got to the house, one of the girls jumped off the garden wall (the houses are higher than the pavement so the wall was higher), she landed in front of Sadie and GRABBED her by the head!! And I don't mean like a tug or a stroke... she literally bear hugged her face!

    I told the girl off for it and she did apologise straight away, but that situation could've ended VERY differently had Sadie not been such a friendly dog. I wish i'd asked to speak to her parents now, but I was too shocked to react properly!

    How would she have liked it if someone jumped out on her in the dark and grabbed her by the head?

    I'm honestly furious about it, I nearly went back out after I got home but i'd said my piece to her and hopefully the shock of being told off was enough of a lesson learned to her. If my precious Rottie had have bitten or snapped out of fear, she would be dead and I would likely be in prison!

    WHY OH WHY do people not teach their kids how to treat dogs? I currently feel SO lucky and proud of my girl for being so good!
     
  2. lilythepink

    lilythepink PetForums VIP

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    Scary stuff.what a good girl you have for not reacting.
     
  3. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    I have 'liked' in I completely understand where you are coming from and I would be just as furious as you are.

    Hope the little girl has learnt her lesson.
     
  4. DollyGirl08

    DollyGirl08 PetForums VIP

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    Wow what a stupid thing to do! Thing is even if some parents DO drill in not to touch strange dogs, some kids still will. I was one of them kids :eek: and would wonder over to any animal I saw to say hello....although granted I never grabbed at or touched an animal unless it came to me.
    Good girl Sadie for not reacting, even though it must have been horrible for her to be grabbed by some strange mini human.
     
  5. Tigerneko

    Tigerneko PetForums VIP

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    Thank you! I am very proud of her for not reacting, although she is very very friendly, that would still be enough to frighten many dogs into biting or snapping! She also doesn't actually like too much close contact with her head, she has grumbled once or twice at me for going mad kissing her head :eek: - not at all aggressively, just a 'that's enough mummy!' little grumble.

    I really was shaken up by it, I can't believe she was so stupid :mad:

    Yep it was very very scary. Especially given her breed, imagine the uproar if she had bitten the girl? That is how these attacks happen and that is how kids are mauled :(
     
  6. bay20

    bay20 PetForums Senior

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    I completely know what you mean some children have no idea how to approach an unkown dog. A little girl once bounded up to my dog and started smacking him on the head (attempting to pat him ) whilst he was eating a treat I had given him whilst training in the park. Thank god I worked hard early to not make him food possessive or it could have ended very differently than him sitting there wondering what was goin on. People need to teach their children any dog no matter what size needs respect. I find it encouraging when children politely ask if its ok to stroke mine. Some people have the right idea
     
  7. Tigerneko

    Tigerneko PetForums VIP

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    Yes, if she had asked if she could stroke them then I would have said yes (although given that i've only had Sadie for a week, I might possibly still have said no purely because it was so dark outside so not ideal for being fussed by strangers) and I don't mind at all when children approach and ask first - it's good socialisation for the dog and it's nice to reward the child for being polite, so I always allow them to say hello where possible... even though I am not a child person, so it's usually done through gritted teeth LOL :p
     
  8. ladydog

    ladydog PetForums Senior

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    I am dreading something like this happening to Lady who hates having her head grabbed. She is the kind of dog who spooks easily.
    Well done on yours for not reacted and I fully understand how scary this must have been for you.
    I hope this little girl will think twice before pulling a stunt like this in the future.
     
  9. kernow

    kernow PetForums Newbie

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    How scary for you, good of Sadie to not react, but you have every right to be angered by it.

    I can't count the number of times I have asked children not to pat/tap/thump Fudgie on top of her head, they usually pull their hand away when she looks up, then put it back when she looks down again and then end up flapping them around, Fudge is usually following the fingers wondering if there is a treat or bit of stray stickiness to lick as usual in children:eek:

    I try and advise them to rub her chest or shoulder as this doesn't cause her to think they have something for her, it is amazing how many are scared to touch that closely but would continue to pat/tap/flap if I let them:(
     
  10. tattoogirl73

    tattoogirl73 PetForums VIP

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    it's posts like these that make me glad i very rarely see kids when i'm out with mine. one of the many advantages to living in the country. hope you're over the shock now.
     
  11. bay20

    bay20 PetForums Senior

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    You should be proud of her for being so good, :) like you say good socialisation, but good for you correcting the girl, hopefully she'll remember that nex time
     
  12. Hanwombat

    Hanwombat I ♥ dogs with eyebrows !!

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    I wish people would teach their children what they can and cannot do with regards to animals. When my horses were at an equestrian centre bloody kids used to run up to one of my horses and walk all around her etc.. Hollie can be sensitive with children so it wouldn't be my fault if they got bitten or kicked! Frankly at least they'd learn! But its different with a horse as they wouldn't get put down.
     
  13. Tigerneko

    Tigerneko PetForums VIP

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    Just spoken to my dad about it on the phone, he reckons I should go and speak to her parents about it - not in a nasty way, just that I was really shaken and upset by it and that it could have been very serious had my dog not been so friendly.

    Unfortunately I don't know whether the house they were playing at was actually hers or not, there was a group of about 5 of them so she could have lived elsewhere and I couldn't even describe her properly... just a girl with blonde hair! I didn't really get a good look at her as it was dark and I was more bothered about making sure my dogs were alright.

    Absolutely kicking myself now for not taking it further and asking to speak to her mum and dad :frown2:
     
  14. bay20

    bay20 PetForums Senior

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    Try not to beat yourself up about it. I know when I was 10 if an adult had told me off for something I'd have been so embarassed I wouldn't forget it easily. I'm sure what you said sunk in. You did all you could at the time. Next time if your passing and notice someone's in maybe pop your head in and just mention it and let them know you we're just concerned.
     
  15. Tigerneko

    Tigerneko PetForums VIP

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    Yeah I would like to. I don't want to get the girl in trouble maliciously, but I think it is SO important that she absolutely knows what she did was totally wrong, if not for her own safety!

    I'm working late tomorrow but I might walk up that way again on Thursday and see if the kids are outside again, I don't normally walk that way so i've never seen them before, but I will keep an eye out. It'll be interesting to see how she reacts to my dogs if she is outside again!
     
  16. cheekymonkey68

    cheekymonkey68 PetForums VIP

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    Well done to your friendly Sadie. My dog would totally have bitten the little girl!
    I had to deal with two kids about the same age 10 ish on bikes taking their huge labradoodle for a walk, off lead in a beauty spot, they wernt even paying attention to what he was doing, and I had to instruct their dog to stay away from mine & heaven knows how they were going to pick his poo up!:mad: Parents have a lot to answer for!!
     
  17. Tigerneko

    Tigerneko PetForums VIP

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    Kids should not be allowed to be unattended in control of a dog until they are at least 16 years old. I know some are more dog savvy and experienced than others, but how would a 12-15 year old know how to deal with a fight? What if someone approached them and threatened them or stole the dog? I know at 16 they are not much better, but at least they are more like adults in the eyes of the law.

    Although having said that, I used to walk our old mongrel on my own from about 8 or 9 years old, but I only went on the park which was across from my house and I was never allowed to let him off his lead.
     
  18. Thorne

    Thorne PetForums VIP

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    Good girl Sadie! A real heart in mouth moment for you though TN :eek:
     
  19. Kivasmum

    Kivasmum PetForums VIP

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    That could of ended badly...for everyone! Good girl Sadie :thumbup: one of the first things I ever drilled into my son about dogs was NEVER approach a dog you don't know without the owners permission, and when you do, do it slowly and kindly. Poor sadie must of wondered what on earth was going on! And as you say, if she had of reacted, and who could blame her if she had! It would of been her that paid the ultimate price :frown2: there should be a stupid people act that runs alongside the dangerous dogs act :mad2:
     
  20. Picklelily

    Picklelily PetForums VIP

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    What a good girl your dog was and how awful to have that happen on your first morning walk. I would perhaps walk that way a few times and see how it goes, hopefully you will catch an adult then.

    So many parents are irresponsible with their children and dogs. We go caravanning a lot and it shocks me how many lazy parents let their children walk the dog. Although I will say with teenagers walking dogs it depends on the teenager, at 15 my son was bigger than me and was actually very calm in his handling of animals, he was perfectly capable of walking the dog. One of his friends I would let her walk my dog now at 20. There has to be thought behind the lead.
     
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